Blue Ray/HDDVD/DIVX network player - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 10-07-2008, 07:54 PM - Thread Starter
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Is there such of player...one that could play those formats over the network?
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post #2 of 8 Old 10-07-2008, 09:17 PM
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You might be able to build one with one of the computer dual drives that are available, but to my knowledge there are no players currently built to do this...
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post #3 of 8 Old 10-07-2008, 10:51 PM
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I doubt you'd be able to stream either of the HD formats over the network because of the studios' requirement that all your hardware be HDCP-compliant. In theory I suppose you could preserve the encryption of the content over the network and decrypt it at the display device, but I don't think the standard is designed for that. Hell, one person here reported that, by design, his HP laptop couldn't even display a Blu-Ray disk on a compliant external TV set; he could only watch it on the laptop's screen.

Material encoded in DivX or XviD is an entirely different matter. I routinely watch XviD/AVI and H.264/MKV content over a network. I just have the player software (mplayer in my case) open a remote file on the server. 802.11g wireless or 100BaseT ethernet has more than enough bandwidth even for 720p, and probably for 1080p, content. (I'd have to do the math for 1080p, and it's too late at night for that )

You might be able to cobble together a solution if you can export the desktop of the machine playing the disk to the remote client with something like Remote Desktop, VNC, or X Windows. Basically you'd be displaying the material on the server and just shipping the display across the network, so HDCP-compliance might be maintained. I'm just guessing about this one, though.
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post #4 of 8 Old 10-08-2008, 05:39 AM
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Outside of the PC/Mac arena no. You'll need two Players/Recorders.
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post #5 of 8 Old 10-08-2008, 09:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fta123 View Post

Is there such of player...one that could play those formats over the network?

Yes, the Popcorn Hour A-100 (or possibly any of the Networked Media Tank (NMT) equivalent products) play these.

With the LG GCC-H20L SuperBlu (BD/HD DVD) player in your PC, and a good, wired 100baseT ethernet connection, you can actually play the HD formats directly over the network, provided of course they have had any copy-protection removed.

Further, the chipset in the NMTs (Sigma Designs) plays Divx & Xvids as well.
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post #6 of 8 Old 10-08-2008, 09:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laserfan View Post

Yes, the Popcorn Hour A-100 (or possibly any of the Networked Media Tank (NMT) equivalent products) play these.

With the LG GCC-H20L SuperBlu (BD/HD DVD) player in your PC, and a good, wired 100baseT ethernet connection, you can actually play the HD formats directly over the network, provided of course they have had any copy-protection removed.

Further, the chipset in the NMTs (Sigma Designs) plays Divx & Xvids as well.

I actually don't believe this is the case - the A-100 and A-110 cannot decode material at the bitrates in a good BR-D disc. You will have to re-encode to a lower bitrate after doing the rip.
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post #7 of 8 Old 10-08-2008, 05:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erwos View Post

I actually don't believe this is the case - the A-100 and A-110 cannot decode material at the bitrates in a good BR-D disc. You will have to re-encode to a lower bitrate after doing the rip.

No, I think he's right -- the Sigma decoders used in the A-100 and A-110 seem perfectly capable of decoding material at BD rates. All of my BD and HD DVD rips have played flawlessly so far. I've remuxed them to get rid of extra or unsupported soundtracks but haven't done a thing to the video.

And this is streaming over wireless (802.11n though, and not very far).

SMB and NFS is a bit slow and can't always keep up with BD bitrates, but I haven't run into any problems with HTTP streaming.
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post #8 of 8 Old 10-09-2008, 06:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterjcat View Post

...the Sigma decoders used in the A-100 and A-110 seem perfectly capable of decoding material at BD rates.

Yes, this is correct. The Sigma chips are designed to be built into BD standalone players (with disc drives inherent, I mean).

I have played original BD discs on my PC's BD drive from my A100 (the movie i.e. m2ts that is) without doing any ripping at all. Was quite delighted to find this would work i.e. a BD disc in my GGC-H20L PC drive over my ethernet-work some 200 feet away in another building. All I did was share the drive using Windows sharing.

There are caveats i.e. if the disc is a "seamless branching" type or the movie otherwise spans multiple m2tses those types of discs aren't going to show very well with this method. Also some discs have audiotracks my A100 isn't capable of.

But if direct disk playback isn't appropriate for the specific disk type, then an application called "ToNMT" will automatically extract the movie and your soundtrack of choice (converting the audio if necessary, but leaving the full video intact i.e. no re-encoding necessary). Then you play the movie across the network in full 1080p glory, and at the original bitrate(s).
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