Will Japanese Gear Work In The States? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-27-2013, 07:10 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
CDLehner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dark Side of the Moon-Right Side of the Bay, MD
Posts: 9,092
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
Liked: 304
OK, finally; I need some of you smarty-pants, EE types...to tell me what's what. tongue.gif

Would gear bought from Japan...like IAs and DACs..."work" in the US? A quick Google, seems to indicate the countries share the same plug...but different voltages; Japan being 100v, vs US 120v?

Any way to pull off this coup?

Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything. -Plato
CDLehner is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-28-2013, 05:47 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arnyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
Posts: 14,387
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 1175
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDLehner View Post

OK, finally; I need some of you smarty-pants, EE types...to tell me what's what. tongue.gif

Would gear bought from Japan...like IAs and DACs..."work" in the US? A quick Google, seems to indicate the countries share the same plug...but different voltages; Japan being 100v, vs US 120v?

Any way to pull off this coup?

Most modern gear designed for either 100 or 120 volts will actually work with from 90 to 140 volts.
arnyk is offline  
Old 08-28-2013, 02:31 PM
Senior Member
 
underminded999's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 378
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Back in the day, Japan ran 240 volts @ 50 htz in the north of the country and 120v @ 60htz in the south. Pretty much any device from the '60's throught the '90's had a voltage selector on the back of the unit.

As long as an unit has a voltage selector you'll be fine. However, you may need a plug adaptor, depending on the provided plug.
underminded999 is offline  
Old 08-28-2013, 06:45 PM
Newbie
 
Currawong's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: An Australian living in Fukuoka, Japan.
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

Most locally-made AV gear is 100V only with no voltage selector (the transformers are specific for use in Japan only). I imagine this is to prevent a grey-market of these goods into countries where there are distributors. Even if it did work plugged into a 120V power outlet, whether or not it will continue to work is another matter.


Currawong on Head-Fi.org.
Currawong is offline  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:00 AM
AVS Special Member
 
commsysman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,292
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Liked: 257
Running that gear on 117V instead of 100 volts should not be a problem, because the power supply circuits mostly have voltage regulators.

If you have a voltage regulator circuit that is designed to put out 22 volts DC, for example, it will always put out 22 volts DC regardless of variations in the
AC input voltage.
commsysman is offline  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:55 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arnyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
Posts: 14,387
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 1175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post

Most locally-made AV gear is 100V only with no voltage selector (the transformers are specific for use in Japan only). I imagine this is to prevent a grey-market of these goods into countries where there are distributors. Even if it did work plugged into a 120V power outlet, whether or not it will continue to work is another matter.

If it is reasonably well designed, it will work just fine.
arnyk is offline  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:51 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
CDLehner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dark Side of the Moon-Right Side of the Bay, MD
Posts: 9,092
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
Liked: 304
Thanks for the replies gents. So...this will probably give some of you a good chuckle; but I'll ask anyway.

No denigration of sound; by running it at a voltage, for which it wasn't designed?

Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything. -Plato
CDLehner is offline  
Old 09-12-2013, 04:49 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BassThatHz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: East side of NW Cascades
Posts: 3,191
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked: 427
Look into the classic series of PS audio power plants, they aren't cheap but they have variable frequency and voltage output selectors. There newer products don't have it.

Beyond that you'd have to assemble your own out of an american AC to DC ham radio power supply and a Japanese DC to AC puresine inverter.

Or you could just sell your gear or run the risk.
BassThatHz is online now  
Old 09-13-2013, 01:27 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Glimmie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 8,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
Liked: 249
If the device has a modern switch mode power supply, it should work on any world line voltage, that is 100v to 250v 50 or 60hz. If the device has a standard power transformer, running it on 120v will stress it. Long term reliability depends on the transformer design as well as how much it's loaded.

You can buy 120v/100v auto transformers and these can be used in either direction so a Japan unit designed to take 100v to 120v can be rewired to take 120v to 100v. You can also make your own with a 20volt transformer which has a secondary current rating equal to (ideally twice) the current demand if the 100v device. Google buck/boost transformer wiring. You want a bucking setup.

Glimmie's HT Page
Being redone - comming soon!

Glimmie is online now  
Old 09-13-2013, 01:43 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arnyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
Posts: 14,387
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 1175
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDLehner View Post

Thanks for the replies gents. So...this will probably give some of you a good chuckle; but I'll ask anyway.

No denigration of sound; by running it at a voltage, for which it wasn't designed?

If you go significantly under voltage a classic analog power supply can let a lot of noise though the power supply regulators.
arnyk is offline  
Old 09-13-2013, 02:08 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Glimmie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 8,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
Liked: 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyk View Post

If you go significantly under voltage a classic analog power supply can let a lot of noise though the power supply regulators.

I should add that if the device has an unregulated power supply and is run from 120v, the internal DC voltages will be higher. Too high? Depends. And even if the internal power supply is regulated and uses a power transformer, the filter capacitors could be overvoltaged - not likely but possible.

I would not run any 100v device on 120v unless I was sure it had a switch mode power supply.

Glimmie's HT Page
Being redone - comming soon!

Glimmie is online now  
Old 09-13-2013, 02:35 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arnyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
Posts: 14,387
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 1175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glimmie View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyk View Post

If you go significantly under voltage a classic analog power supply can let a lot of noise though the power supply regulators.

I should add that if the device has an unregulated power supply and is run from 120v, the internal DC voltages will be higher. Too high? Depends. And even if the internal power supply is regulated and uses a power transformer, the filter capacitors could be overvoltaged - not likely but possible.

Regulator chips are now penny-ante jelly beans and probably cost less than electrolytic capacitors. Virtually every major internal power supply (except the power amps) in quality audio gear (even $40 DVD players) run off of regulators. Therefore, the first fatalities related to excess line voltages are often the regulator chips themselves.
Quote:
I would not run any 100v device on 120v unless I was sure it had a switch mode power supply.

I've broken that rule with impunity for over 30 years.

Interestingly enough, those same $40 DVD players generally have a switchmode power supply with jelly bean regulators on the outputs.
arnyk is offline  
 
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off