Is there no longer a VHS/BetaMax/Hi8 board on the AVS forum? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 06-04-2013, 09:18 PM - Thread Starter
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Perhaps I've been absent for far to long, but I was certain there use to be a board dedicated to the magnetic movie mediums.

Anywho.I've finally, after quite literally years of searching (been on the hunt since 2006) , gotten my hands on a VCR (VHS) that features S-Video output. biggrin.gif

And naturally, I get it hooked up and.... it won't accept a tape. NOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!
Thank God there is still a repair shop in the county that works on VCRs. Needless to say it is in their capable hands now, with a repair figure estimated to be between $80 and $130. An extrememly hard hit to my wallet, but if that's the price that must be paid to finally offload the old home videos at the highest possible quality onto my PC then so be it.

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post #2 of 10 Old 06-05-2013, 11:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qualar View Post

....with a repair figure estimated to be between $80 and $130. An extrememly hard hit to my wallet, but if that's the price that must be paid to finally offload the old home videos at the highest possible quality onto my PC then so be it.

I would just get another unit off Ebay. Not only is repair expensive, they may have problems getting parts.

BTW, the price is fair. Labor is expensive. But you should be able to find working SVHS VCRs today for free or next to nothing.

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post #3 of 10 Old 06-05-2013, 06:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Super VHS isn't the issue here, I have a great 6 head SVHS player. The issue here is "Super Video" (aka S-Video), the 5-pin din output exclusive to only the top model VCRs. When doing video capture to a computer the clarity and contrast of S-Video blows away that of composite and RF signals.

But S-Video VCRs were anything but cheap. The Mitsubishi U67 I have checked in for repair would've retailed back in 1992 for about a grand, Likewise, even near the end of VHS mainstream life cycle I recall when my parents bought their final VCR at Wal*Mart (2000 or 2001) it cost them around $130 for their Toshiba SVHS VCR that has Stereo A/V (composite video). As I was present for that shopping venture I do recall that the one model they carried which featured S-Video was priced at around the $300 mark.

Not a big mystery why such VCRs are so rare when you take into account that they were priced at double or better that of their Stereo A/V bretheren... and also taking into account that if a place like Wal*Mart, which I'm sure must've had a good twenty plus makes and models of VCRs in-stock that day yet only had a single model featuring S-Video output.

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post #4 of 10 Old 06-05-2013, 06:44 PM
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As far as I remember, every Super VHS VCR also had S-video connections (so much so, in fact, that those connections were often called "S-VHS connectors".) Super VHS and S-video were so intertwined when the format was introduced that many people said "I will not buy an S-VHS VCR because I would need a new TV to connect it." Maybe there were S-VHS machines without S-video connectors late in the format's life, but I never saw one (nor did I look, to be honest).

None of this should be confused with "S-VHS playback ability" in any way. That was the setting or function on some regular VHS VCRs to accept Super VHS tapes and play them with standard-VHS quality. None of THOSE machines likely had S-video connections.

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post #5 of 10 Old 06-06-2013, 07:07 AM
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I also don't believe there ever was a S-VHS machine made that didn't have S-video out, after all using only composite it would be hard to tell any quality difference between the two formats so you really need the higher quality connector to show the benefit. What I'm not sure is if there were ever any regular VHS machines made that also had S-video outputs. There were recorders made that did, I have a couple Panasonic combo DVDRs that have a S-video output even though they were only VHS but the connector was mainly meant for the DVD side but you had the added benefit of being able to watch VHS through it too.
AFA a VCR forum, AVS never had one, the most used forum for VHS topics is the DVD Recorders forum where people are mainly trying to convert their VHS tapes to DVD.
AFA fixing your old VCR or purchasing a used one, it's kind of a crap shoot. Sometimes you can find a very little used VCR at second hand shops like the Goodwill, Salvation Army or even pawn shops. Many of them were probably only used to play tapes as not a lot of people actually bothered to record but S-VHS machines are harder to find in little used condition since people actually had to go out of their way to purchase them and they had to spend more than the $99 that regular VHS machines were going for near the end. The people who purchased S-VHS machines were probably far more likely to record and actually use them quite a bit.
Personally I'd check out second hand shops for a clean S-VHS machine, if you don't find one and get tired of looking you might want to get yours fixed. A big advantage to fixing yours is if you have tapes you've recorded on it, they always play best on the actual machine that recorded it, this is particularly important if you used SLP(or EP) speed, less important with SP tapes which have a lot more leeway as far as players.
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post #6 of 10 Old 06-06-2013, 11:15 AM
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I have never heard of an SVHS VCR that didn't have an Svideo connector either. But of course that doesn't mean there wasn't a few made that were composite only. Towards the end of the format life, all kinds of weird things were done.

Some SVHS background:

First all Betamax, 8mm, and VHS VCRs separated chroma from the luminance and recorded it as AM while the luminance was FM modulated to the tape. This was called "color under" and was first used in industrial VCRs such as 3/4 inch and 1/2 inch reel to reel machines. The chroma is NOT on a separate track as is often claimed. It is just frequency separated. There were two broadcast formats that grew out of VHS and Betamax and did in fact put the chroma on a separate track, Sony Betacam and Panasonic M formats. But these were not consumer machines by a long shot. (And they actually recorded component video not just Y/C.) So any VHS or Betamax VCR could have had an Svideo connector included with some of the benefits of SVHS VCRS, that is not recombining the chroma to composite video. Keep it separated into the monitor. The industry just didn't bother at first because there was not Svideo standard yet and after they did introduce SVHS, they probably didn't want to improve standard VHS and undercut SVHS sales.

In addition to allowing separate chroma and luminance inputs and outputs, SVHS raised the FM carrier frequencies slightly which resulted in slightly more video bandwidth and lower noise. This is why SVHS recordings don't play perfectly on standard VHS machines. The FM frequency bandpass off the tape is wrong for standard VHS. the later standard VHS machines with SVHS playback capability probably just changed the demodulator bandpass when an SVHS tape was played. This would have given you a slightly better composite output than a standard VHS tape playback. But of course the cost of the circuitry to support the Svideo connectors was saved as well as the changes in the luminance record section.

There is no difference in the chroma bandwidth or quality between standard VHS and SVHS, just the luminance bandwidth is expanded in SVHS - which was still an overall improvement to standard VHS.

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post #7 of 10 Old 06-08-2013, 11:29 AM
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Why did you not buy a DVHS VCR? I have one and I'm using component out which is better than SVideo and some models even have HDMI out. I haven't tried it but I think I can copy using the component on regular VHS tapes not the DVHS tapes (all I have is ALIEN just because smile.gif)
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post #8 of 10 Old 01-09-2014, 08:45 PM
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Perhaps I've been absent for far to long, but I was certain there use to be a board dedicated to the magnetic movie mediums.

Anywho.I've finally, after quite literally years of searching (been on the hunt since 2006) , gotten my hands on a VCR (VHS) that features S-Video output. biggrin.gif

And naturally, I get it hooked up and.... it won't accept a tape. NOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!
Thank God there is still a repair shop in the county that works on VCRs. Needless to say it is in their capable hands now, with a repair figure estimated to be between $80 and $130. An extrememly hard hit to my wallet, but if that's the price that must be paid to finally offload the old home videos at the highest possible quality onto my PC then so be it.



HI - I too have been gone since I bought my Mits 3800 DLP front projector - 4 yrs ago. I too remember a VCR section (I think - back when I first showed up here in 2004?) Saw your thread so posted here for a suggestion since being away myself for so long.

BTW I had a S-VHS deck in the late 80's and loved the format - sad that in never really caught on. and yes S-Video was the best standard prior to Component (and now HDMI, which is coming to my advice/suggestion.

Why not buy (I bought 2 - for safe measure (its just sitting in a box for the day my current VHS unit dies), against when VHS decks will become like B&W tvs - 500 bucks on e-bay) the Toshiba 620 Combo DVD-rw/VHS deck (what I have in a box - and have the 670(same but with a Tuner) in living room now). she costs 170 new and 120 refurbed and has HDMI out for both VHS and DVD signal.

so you can used the HDMI out (which will give you the best signal - noise of any VHS video you'll ever see - and its noticeably "cleaner" than S-video
and we all know VHS needs all the help it can get.

OR, you can make a cleanest possible copy from your VHS tape directly to the DVD-r section of the unit! - then view the perfect copy via the same HDMI out!

I've had the 670 version now for 4 yrs and love it (670 had built in tuner and cost 200 bucks then - now its 80 bucks new due to it being discontinued and even used ones are worth more than what I paid 4 yrs ago for the 670!!)

_ I'd recommend the get a 620 model before they "Dissapeer" forever ;-/. Toshiba, and Mits made the best VCRs IMO - Mits were the best (late 80's) - followed by Toshiba (80's and 90's)

no others ever made decent VCRs - incuding my S-VHS (which was RCA - it was not great - but adequate for its uses and 1/2 the cost of other S-VHS brands at the time).

good luck!
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post #9 of 10 Old 01-09-2014, 08:48 PM
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type above Toshiba 670 is not 80 now - its 800 new via ebay.


vs 170 for the 620 model
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post #10 of 10 Old 01-09-2014, 08:51 PM
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one more historical correction - JVC the inventor of the format also made units on par with Toshiba, and Panasonics also.

so to be far 4 manufacturers did make excellent VCRs for a couple of decades.

..........

that leaves out Sony - which has not been any good since the 1970's in truth.
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