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post #31 of 75 Old 01-28-2007, 11:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PooperScooper View Post

Update: 6/11/2006

Out of the blue came a great contribution from AVS member ADU. What he did took a fair amount of effort and I appreciate it, and I hope others will too.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&&#post7809555

I had missed this post. Some more answers: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&&#post7641277


larry


Here's a start at a FAQ list for this forum. Please reply with any additions or if you want to volunteer to answer a question. Answers can be text only or have links to posts here at AVS or elsewhere in addition to some text. Hopefully this will be a group effort. Probably the best way to do this inside the forum software is to make each answer a separate post. So, in the 2nd post there will be the answered questions with a link to the post in the thread that answers the question. Editing separate posts will make things easier also. And once a question is answered and everybody is happy with the answer, I'll can delete any "collateral" posts in this thread.

1) Is DVI/HDMI better than component?
2) What is an upscaling DVD player?
3) What is an upconverting DVD player?
(see upscaling DVD player above)
4) What is this "macroblocking" everybody is talking about?
5) What is deinterlacing?
6) What is progressive scan?
7) What is native resolution?
8) What DVD players output 480i via HDMI?
9) What DVD players upscale/upconvert via component outputs?
10) What is i.Link?
11) What is DenonLink?
12) Will I get a better picture if I buy an upconverting DVD player?
13) What is BTB? (and what is WTW?)
14) Do I have to pay $100 or more for a DVI or HDMI cable?
15) Will expensive component cables make a difference?
16) Which will sound better, coax or optical output on my DVD player?
17) What DVD players output 1080p?
18) What DVD players allow you to make custom resolutions?
19) Why do I still have black bars on my widescreen tv?
20) Why does my image seem stretched? Help!
21) What is pillarboxing?


I am questioning the all too brief answer to number 9. It seems a little inadequate for such an important question, although I to agree that this section is an enormously useful contribution. For most experienced viewers, or in double blind reports, the difference in quality between a 480P signal and an upconverted one from a DVD player is disputable. So the question of interpolation with filters (this is how upconverting works) through analog outputs (component) becomes very complex. I have yet to see a company claim in their manual that the interpolation is available through component output, and although i have tried very hard, I have never seen a video display that looked better upconverted seen through any analog input. So I am asking for help. Is there a list as number 9 suggests? Has anyone ever seen with certainty that interpolation is outputted through component and finally has this ever been objectively verified by the display showing the HD resoloution numbers 720P or 1080i displayed when compoment is hooked up? Thank you very much for any information you all might have on this issue.

Barry
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post #32 of 75 Old 02-23-2007, 09:08 PM
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Are there DVD players that will play PAL content without any codes entered? I have been looking at this Philips DVP5960. School me!
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post #33 of 75 Old 05-18-2007, 03:27 AM
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informative post, support!
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post #34 of 75 Old 05-21-2007, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADU View Post

Code:

              -----Type----- -------Resolutions--------
              Digital Analog 1080p 1080i 720p 480p 480i
Video & Audio
HDMI             X             s     X    X    X    s  
RF Coaxial*             X                           X

Video only
DVI-D            X                   X    X    X    s
YPbPr Component         X            f    f    p    X
Y/C S-Video             X                           X
Composite               X                           X

Audio only
S/PDIF Coaxial   X
TOSLINK Optical  X
Denon Link       X
L/R Stereo RCAs         X

s- on some upconverting players.
f- on a few upconverting players (may require hack, or only work 
    with unprotected discs).
p- on progressive players.
*- generally only included on lower-end or DVD/VHS combo players.



DVI-D is capable of 1080p - I have my LVM-37W1 running at 1080p to my PC via DVI-D right now. I think some people assume DVI-D doesn't do 1080p because of HDCP issues. There are older 1080p DVI panels out there without HDCP support - no 1080p sources will output at 1080p on these panels because they can't establish an HDCP handshake. But there are some out there with HDCP support, like my panel - although I have yet to test the HDCP on this set, I use it strictly with the PC.

My video card doesn't support HDCP. I think this means it won't display 1080p sources, like a blu-ray or hd-dvd drive, because those devices have drivers which won't provide a 1080p signal unless HDCP is established. I think Windows Vista reinforces this model by providing additional protection of the data path between a 1080p source and the video out. These devices may only work on Vista - not sure. Perhaps someone else can chime in.

Anyhow, so yeah DVI-D can do 1080p. In fact, DVI-D can do up to 1920x1200 @ 60hz, and with two DVI-D cables utilizing dual link, it can do up to 3840x2400 @ 33hz, according to wikipedia. HDMI is still a better option, as it is one cable that can easily match two DVI-D dual link cables.


It's also interesting to note that RF-Coaxial can carry digital video over QAM channels, so it isn't strictly analog, and can support all those hd video resolutions. In fact, I believe in the US, all broadcasts will be transitioning to digital by 2009.
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post #35 of 75 Old 05-22-2007, 09:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrd999 View Post

In fact, DVI-D can do up to 1920x1200 @ 60hz, and with two DVI-D cables utilizing dual link, it can do up to 3840x2400 @ 33hz, according to wikipedia. HDMI is still a better option, as it is one cable that can easily match two DVI-D dual link cables.

"Dual-link" doesn't refer to using two DVI cables in parallel. A single DVI cable or device can be "single-link" or "dual-link" by specification. Dual-link cables/connectors have additional pins, and can carry two digital DVI data links over one cable/connector (enabling the high-bandwidth resolutions you mentioned).

Look carefully at the Wikipedia article, specifically the "Connector" section and DVI pinout diagram.
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post #36 of 75 Old 08-01-2007, 10:32 AM
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I have a Mits. 65732. Love it! I have an old Samsung progressive scan DVD/VCR combo. It looks good with composite hookup. Finally purchased component cables from monopricecom but picture is "worse!". 480i is better than 480p with progressive scan. Picure is very blurry with 480p. I have always heard how much better component was than composite. What is my problem? Any ideas or help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
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post #37 of 75 Old 09-05-2007, 08:37 AM
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I have a basic question. (BTW this is not about HD-DVD)
I understand that DVD standards for video resolutions are 720×480 (NTSC) or 720×576 (PAL). (i.e. 480i/p or 576i/p)
Is it possible to author a DVD with higher resolution videos and then play them in a regular DVD player??
I have a 1080p avi file. Can I make a regular DVD out of it with the same resolution and then play it back in my regular DVD player??
If so how??
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post #38 of 75 Old 09-05-2007, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ontherocks View Post

I have a basic question. (BTW this is not about HD-DVD)
I understand that DVD standards for video resolutions are 720×480 (NTSC) or 720×576 (PAL). (i.e. 480i/p or 576i/p)
Is it possible to author a DVD with higher resolution videos and then play them in a regular DVD player??
I have a 1080p avi file. Can I make a regular DVD out of it with the same resolution and then play it back in my regular DVD player??
If so how??

No, not generally. There are a few players that will play HD divx files and other things, but none of the major brands. See the HD checkboxes on this search page: http://www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers

You have a lot more flexibility in file formats with a PC, of course.

-Bill
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post #39 of 75 Old 09-06-2007, 06:45 AM
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Actually I didn't mean to just burn the avi file to a DVD and try to play it in a player BUT to author a DVD (convert to .vobs) and then play it in a DVD player.
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post #40 of 75 Old 09-06-2007, 07:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ontherocks View Post

Actually I didn't mean to just burn the avi file to a DVD and try to play it in a player BUT to author a DVD (convert to .vobs) and then play it in a DVD player.

Same answer. SD-DVD players do not play HD contents (with the exceptions noted previously).

-Bill
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post #41 of 75 Old 10-15-2007, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by polychromeuganda View Post

8) What DVD players output 480i via HDMI?
There is no reason to send interlaced video over HDMI, but if it convinces people to buy one, it will be on the box.

No reason? Seems like this would be a useful feature for those with external scaler boxes, something I'm considering. You want a pure digital signal, but no deinterlacing or upconversion...you'd want your dedicated scaler doing that.
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post #42 of 75 Old 10-26-2007, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polychromeuganda View Post

1) Is DVI/HDMI better than component?
DVI signal is before digital to analog conversion which cannot improve the signal.

2) What is an upscaling DVD player?
The DVD player attempts to connect-the-dots to add scan lines that were not present in the recorded images. The result is often visually pleasing, but will not contain additional detail not previously present. This feature is associated with digital (HDMI) video output and is of particular interest when the DVD is better than the display is at scaling to the display's native resolution.
3) What is an upconverting DVD player?
(see upscaling DVD player above)
The DVD player attempts to connect-the-dots to add scan lines that were not present in the recorded images. The result is often visually pleasing, but will not contain additional detail not previously present. This feature is associated with analog (component, VGA, SCART) video output and is of interest for either CRT projectors or for digital displays without HDMI when when the DVD is better than the display is at scaling to the display's native resolution

4) What is this "macroblocking" everybody is talking about?
Macroblocks are always present in compressed video, they are genereally visible as the square blurs that show up in fast action scenes or square splats of junk when there is a signal problem, e.g. fingerprints on the DVD, satellite TV during a blizzard. Why they show up is a long story...
In the beginning the FFT begat the DCT which begat JPEG, which begat MPEG the 1st which begat MPEG the 2nd, which begat MPEG the 4th, which begat Ray, the Blue... And in all of these the DCT was computed within an 8 x 8 box, these being the third power of two, for the powers of 2 are sacred unto the hardware and also the most fertile radix of the FFT and all its descendents for all generations. These 8x8 boxes are the veseels of the spectral powers that compress the frothy ergodic image bits into a solid block, packed and full of bit-entropy. So great is the power of these blocks that they are called the MACRO-BLOCKS. Whenever the foolish attempt to starve their bits or err when serving them, their wroth cannot be concealed and their form shows itself blotting out all things - yea crushing dissenting detail within their bound. Woe be to them who starve them or serve their bits in error, for they shall see only the block.

5) What is deinterlacing?
De-interlacing is the interlacing that converts a stream of pictures to a video signal suitable for broatcast and display on a CRT. The face of the CRT is coated with phosphors that light up when excited and then fade out. If the phosphors don't fade quickly, all motion turns to a blur. If the phosphors do fade quickly, the top of the screen has faded before the bottom has been excited. If the pictures were sent twice as fast, then there would have been only 6 TV channels instead of 12. So... to get from top to bottom twice as fast first only the odd numbered scan lines are sent, and then back to the top and then the even numbered scan lines are sent. The original TV cameras used an image-orthicon tube scanned just like the display tubes. When they send a 24fps movie out on NTSC TV systemsat 30fps it causes a visual stutter called judder if they just repeat 8 of the 24 frames to get the 30. It looks a lot better if the frame changes in between even and odd scan lines since those scan fields go by 60 times a second. On the PAL systems they speed the film up to 25fps which shifts the voices and music off key, but that became fixable when computers became fast enough.
De-interlacing film that was converted to video is just finding the interlaced fields that go with each frame and merging them.
De-interlacing true video has a problem... Objects in motion moved in between the even and odd fields. There can be a noticable haircomb look to vertical edges that were in motion... "combing". If the frame rate is doubled each frame contains one up-to-date field and one stale field. Blending the fields blurs the moving parts of the image. Tracking the motions and synthesizing a frame in the middle of the two fields makes it possible to recover foreground objects in the center of the frame. Objects entering the frame, or being revealed behind objects in motion can't always be fixed up this way. There is no perfect solution to this problem.

6) What is progressive scan?
Progressive scan is a video signal that sends all the scan lines sequentially from top to bottom, as opposed to interlaced. It isn't always the same as a de-interlaced signal, but it is always what a de-interlaced should have been...

7) What is native resolution?
Every current digital video technology assumes that each image is made up of a grid of pixels. Some current assumptions are that the grid is 352, 640, 704, 720, 800, 1024, 1200, or 1920 pixels wide, and 240, 480, 540, 576, 720, or 1080 pixels high. When a device must change the resolution of a signal in order to process it, it converts it to its native resolution, this conversion can never improve the signal, only degrade it.
For example, to fill its screen a digital video display (plasmaa, LCD or DLP) that with a native resolution of 800 x 600 must convert all incoming signals to 800 x 600 in order to display them. This conversion necessarily degrades the signal, the only choice is how to trade off blurring and ringing.
Analog systems have a different but analogous constraint called bandwidth. A CRT projector can potentially be driven to directly display any assumed grid resolution. If the image resolution exceeds the video bandwidth of the projector then details will blur. If the image resolution is too low, the CRT projector may be dim or show scan lines because it is drawing the image with too narrow a line. Practical CRT projectors have a limited selection of scan rates, corresponding to those useful for its bandwidth and spot size.

8) What DVD players output 480i via HDMI?
There is no reason to send interlaced video over HDMI, but if it convinces people to buy one, it will be on the box.

9) What DVD players upscale/upconvert via component outputs?
Its easier to find the feature on HDMI, but no list will ever be complete.

10) What is i.Link?
Sony's proprietary implementation of the IEEE-1394 standard generally known as FireWire. I.Link uses only the four signal pins, discarding the two pins that provide power to the device in favor of a separate power connector on Sony's i.Link products. (Edited from the Wikipedia article)

11) What is DenonLink?
A proprietary digital video interface used by Denon before Firewire was available. There are several incompatible levels and revisions.

12) Will I get a better picture if I buy an upconverting DVD player?
No, but your display device may produce a more pleasing result. If you have an LCD or DLP display, the result should not be more pleasing unless there's something wrong with the internal conversion to native resolution that this can help sidestep. If you have a CRT the result might be more pleasing... or not.

13) What is BTB? (and what is WTW?)
These are abbreviations for acronyms the refer to video signals levels beyond the displayable range that are used for synchronization. BTB stands for Blacker Than Black. WTW stands for Whiter Than White. There is a temptation to believe that 0v is black and 1v is white, but in fact it depends on the video system. Broadcast video is sent with the maximum signal being black because added noise, or snow, is more prominient on a small signal and less visible on white.

14) Do I have to pay $100 or more for a DVI or HDMI cable?
If you want to find a better price, try shopping around, try Froogle, try eBay. I'd say it was hard to spend $100 on one, but a fool and his money are soon parted, so you might as well spend it on the cable since she won't like any better after dinner at an expensive restaurant than she did before.
If you want one for free try dropping a lot of hints and see if anyone gives you one for Christmas.
If that fails and you want to have a $100 cable without the risk of becoming a guest at the county hotel, paying for it would be a good idea.

15) Will expensive component cables make a difference?
They will to your dealer... The simple technical truth is that RCA connector is so bad that nothing else makes much difference between cables less than 4 feet long. Even audio patch cords. At those lengths better coaxial wire with less loss only encourages more ringing between the discontinuities at the connectors which has a much worse effect on the picture than the high frequency loss. For long cable runs a lower loss cable may be helpful, a double sheilded cable will certailnly be more helpful. RCA to type F adapters make it possible to create an excelent cabling solution that is also cost effective. Braided sheilds are more forgiving, so be wary of foil sheilded cable, unsupported bends at the equipment ends will probably become too sharp and the sheild will develop gaps just as it does for repeated flexing.
Don't waste money on "gold plated" connectors. Gold isn't a superior conductor (silver is), its only value is corrosion protection, but it takes a thick coating to close the pores so the base metal oxide mushroom heads don't dominate the surface. The 5 to 30 micro-inch gold wash on consumer connectors provides little or no corrosion protection. It takes 100 to 300 microinches of gold over 60 to 100 microinches of nickel over at least 30 microinches of copper over the base metal to achieve reasonable corrosion protection.
Do replace cables more often... especially if you live in the city. Consumer cabling lacks any gas barriers, the fine wires in the shielding oxidize readily, especially in urban areas where sulfer levels are higher. Coaxial cables don't stand up well to abuse. Cables run across the floor decline rapidly.
Cables with that really nice feel - soft and flexible and smooth like butter - are worthless. From a technical standpoint the most desirable construction is a solid uniform silver tube containing a silver rod supported by stiffened air. The larger the diameter the better. The less a given coaxial cable resembles the ideal the worse it performs. Of course, the ideal one is a bit of a pain to install...

16) Which will sound better, coax or optical output on my DVD player?
Both, or neither if you prefer. There is no reason that either interface should have any bit errors at the bit rates used. That said, the coaxial interface has a greater risk of bit errors from ground loops (think "hum") and the optical link has a greater risk of bit errors from cable and connector damage and failure. In either case persistent subtle differences are unlikely, if there's a problem, you'll hear it.

17) What DVD players output 1080p?
The ones that say they do... they probably say "HDTV" or "HD-DVD" or "Blue-Ray" or "HD-DivX" or whatever the marketing gimmick of the week is. The "upsomething" ones may also produce the signal format. If all else fails try an HTPC.

18) What DVD players allow you to make custom resolutions?
People made their customary New Years resolutions long before there were DVD players. If you want a DVD player that will change the resolution of the signal, then you either want standards conversion PAL <-> NTSC or you want upconversion or line doubling. If you want one that will do a lot of things you've never been able to find, then you probably want an HTPC.

19) Why do I still have black bars on my widescreen tv?
Assuming you haven't been incarcerated, you probably need to let your DVD player or set top box know about your new TV. Somewhere this is a setup screen where you need to tell the signal source that it is sending the signal to a 16:9 display. The factory default for these devices is "4:3 Letterbox", which is what your old TV was.

20) Why does my image seem stretched? Help!
If everyone looks like Stan Laurel, then the signal source, the DVD player or set top box, is set to 16:9 and the display is 4:3. If everyone looks like Oliver Hardy, then the signal source is set to 4:3 and the display is 16:9. Some 16:9 displays are capable of outsmarting the signal source, you may need to check the setup.

21) What is pillarboxing?
When a 4:3 image is shown on a 16:9 display, the height is filled before the width, leaving extra space at the sides. When the opposite occurs displaying a 16:9 image on a 4:3 display its called letterboxing. What the US Postal Service calls a leterbox is known on the opposite side if the Atlantic to the Royal Mail as a pillarbox. That's why letterboxing looks a bit like a letter, and pillarboxing doesn't look much like a pillar. The names were chosen by someone who was feeling 'oh so very very clever' that day.

Thanks for the information...very well explained
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post #43 of 75 Old 11-21-2007, 11:53 AM
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(not sure if this questions belongs in this forum. please move it to relevent area if need be)

My question is related to whether or not HD dvd's are really HD.
If you buy a 1080P TV (currently the highest TV display possible) aren't the HD-dvd movies subjected to that display cap of 1080p?
Or does an HD-dvd raise the TVs display capabilites so that it surpasses 1080p?

my question stems from some of the newer upscaling 1080p dvd players in the market. My belief is that since a TV CANNOT go higher then 1080p that would mean that a HD-dvd is in fact just a 1080p dvd; and a dvd player that upscales to 1080p is doing the same thing as an already HD-dvd encoded disc.

Am I understanding this wrong?
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post #44 of 75 Old 11-21-2007, 12:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevraider View Post

(not sure if this questions belongs in this forum. please move it to relevent area if need be)

It probably would be more appropriate in one of the HD forums.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sevraider View Post

My question is related to whether or not HD dvd's are really HD.

Yes, they are.

Quote:


If you buy a 1080P TV (currently the highest TV display possible) aren't the HD-dvd movies subjected to that display cap of 1080p?

Yes.

Quote:


Or does an HD-dvd raise the TVs display capabilites so that it surpasses 1080p?

No.

Quote:


my question stems from some of the newer upscaling 1080p dvd players in the market. My belief is that since a TV CANNOT go higher then 1080p that would mean that a HD-dvd is in fact just a 1080p dvd; and a dvd player that upscales to 1080p is doing the same thing as an already HD-dvd encoded disc.

You lost me there. Standard definition DVDs images contain 720x480 pixels (NSTC). HD-DVD and Blu-Ray contain 1920x1080. You can upscale SD-DVD so that the image fits a HD display, but the source is still Standard Definition, not HD.

-Bill
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post #45 of 75 Old 11-21-2007, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevraider View Post

(not sure if this questions belongs in this forum. please move it to relevent area if need be)

My question is related to whether or not HD dvd's are really HD.
If you buy a 1080P TV (currently the highest TV display possible) aren't the HD-dvd movies subjected to that display cap of 1080p?
Or does an HD-dvd raise the TVs display capabilites so that it surpasses 1080p?

my question stems from some of the newer upscaling 1080p dvd players in the market. My belief is that since a TV CANNOT go higher then 1080p that would mean that a HD-dvd is in fact just a 1080p dvd; and a dvd player that upscales to 1080p is doing the same thing as an already HD-dvd encoded disc.

Am I understanding this wrong?

Although a DVD player can upscale to 1080p from say 480i/p source, the information is still "calculated" from the 480i/p. The extra pixels (difference between 480 and 1080) are "estimation" vs an HD source (say 1080p) has all the "exact" pixel (contents) for the panel to display. You'll see a difference between the two.
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post #46 of 75 Old 11-21-2007, 03:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post

You lost me there. Standard definition DVDs images contain 720x480 pixels (NSTC). HD-DVD and Blu-Ray contain 1920x1080. You can upscale SD-DVD so that the image fits a HD display, but the source is still Standard Definition, not HD.

-Bill

So even if the DVD player up-converts the sd-dvd signal to 1080p, the pixel count will remain at 720x480.

correct?
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post #47 of 75 Old 11-21-2007, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevraider View Post

So even if the DVD player up-converts the sd-dvd signal to 1080p, the pixel count will remain at 720x480.

correct?

The signal sent to the display will have 1920x1080 pixels, but these have been interpolated from the 720x480 source. This can work better than it sounds, but it is not the same as a 1920x1080 original source.

-Bill
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post #48 of 75 Old 12-28-2007, 08:19 PM
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I have several dvds that say they are enhanced for wide screen tv's but when I play them with my Sony upconverting dvd player over HDMI I still get the letter box format on my HDTV. I understand that this is for maintaining the original theatrical aspect ratio. But if the dvd is enhanced for widescreen tv's then why is the letterbox still present.

I have my dvd player set to 16:9 display mode.

Thanks in advance.


Jay
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post #49 of 75 Old 12-29-2007, 03:48 AM
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Originally Posted by crengineer View Post

I have several dvds that say they are enhanced for wide screen tv's but when I play them with my Sony upconverting dvd player over HDMI I still get the letter box format on my HDTV. I understand that this is for maintaining the original theatrical aspect ratio. But if the dvd is enhanced for widescreen tv's then why is the letterbox still present.

I have my dvd player set to 16:9 display mode.

Thanks in advance.


Jay

If there are black bars on all four sides, then I would say the discs are mislabeled.

If there are black bars above and below and the OAR is wider than 1.78:1 (=16:9) then that is the way it is supposed to be. See http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/sh...rs_Go_Away/764

-Bill
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post #50 of 75 Old 01-02-2008, 03:29 PM
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Now that I have a DVD HD player, I had a choice to make. Do I hook the HDMi from the cable to the TV and componet from the DVD to the TV (my TV only has one HDMI input.) Or HDMI from the DVD to the tv and componet from the cable to the TV?

I thought I would lose a little by having the componet to the TV. As it turned out. I see no difference in the componet to the TV in HD, and the DVD (HDMI)
looks fantastic.
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post #51 of 75 Old 01-02-2008, 07:43 PM
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You absolutely want to rum the HDMI from the DVD player rather than the cable box. All hd DVD players upconvert SD DVD's only through the HDMI output, not component. This has to do with content protection but is another example of industry nonesense as they are protecting an analog signal. On the other hand you have already said that the signal from the cable box was fine with component, so you are all set, Barry.

Barry
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post #52 of 75 Old 01-06-2008, 02:14 AM
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Hi, I have a question about DVD player connection. I want to connect my (1) DVD player to receiver via HDMI, then receiver to TV via HDMI. (2) Same DVD player directly to the TV via component. I want the connection like this because sometimes I may want to watch DVDs without turning on my HT. My question is, with this set up: (1) will I be able to watch audio-video via hdmi when my receiver is "on"? (2) Will I be able to watch audio-video via component when my receiver is "off"?........Thanks.
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post #53 of 75 Old 01-06-2008, 03:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamBD View Post

Hi, I have a question about DVD player connection. I want to connect my (1) DVD player to receiver via HDMI, then receiver to TV via HDMI. (2) Same DVD player directly to the TV via component. I want the connection like this because sometimes I may want to watch DVDs without turning on my HT. My question is, with this set up: (1) will I be able to watch audio-video via hdmi when my receiver is "on"? (2) Will I be able to watch audio-video via component when my receiver is "off"?........Thanks.

I see no problem. Most players transmit on HDMI and component simultaneously, but you should check that your player does this, or has a way of switching.

Obviously you'll have to run audio separately for (2).

-Bill
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post #54 of 75 Old 01-06-2008, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamBD View Post

Hi, I have a question about DVD player connection. I want to connect my (1) DVD player to receiver via HDMI, then receiver to TV via HDMI. (2) Same DVD player directly to the TV via component. I want the connection like this because sometimes I may want to watch DVDs without turning on my HT. My question is, with this set up: (1) will I be able to watch audio-video via hdmi when my receiver is "on"? (2) Will I be able to watch audio-video via component when my receiver is "off"?........Thanks.

Another approach is to skip the receiver with the HDMI connection and go straight to the TV with it. Then take an audio digital output from the DVD player to the receiver. That way, the TV gets the A-V signal, and the receiver can be added in when you want surround sound.
Barry.

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post #55 of 75 Old 01-29-2008, 08:58 PM
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Hi

From reading these forums I think I know the answer to this, but haven't seen this exact question, so I would like clarification.

I just got the samsung LNT4069 and the quality is really good when watching HDTV content. However, when I use my standard DVD player, I am not impressed. Mainly the colors seem very bland. Is this because of the DVD player or should I be concerned about the TV? Can I expect quality similar to the HDTV content if I get blu ray? What about an upconverting dvd player?

I watched a bit of the simpsons movie and I thought the quality was great, but for Gladiator and LOTR:Fellowship of the Ring the quality was dissapointing.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
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post #56 of 75 Old 01-30-2008, 04:36 AM
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Originally Posted by shoebobs View Post

I just got the samsung LNT4069 and the quality is really good when watching HDTV content. However, when I use my standard DVD player, I am not impressed. Mainly the colors seem very bland. Is this because of the DVD player or should I be concerned about the TV? Can I expect quality similar to the HDTV content if I get blu ray? What about an upconverting dvd player?

I watched a bit of the simpsons movie and I thought the quality was great, but for Gladiator and LOTR:Fellowship of the Ring the quality was dissapointing.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

All these systems have about the same color capability, but your display needs to be calibrated for each input separately. See brief notes on calibration discs here: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&&#post9889995

How is the DVD player connected to the display?

Note that some movies use distinct color grading for effect: LOTR is a pretty severe example, especially in the first two films.

-Bill
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post #57 of 75 Old 01-30-2008, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post

All these systems have about the same color capability, but your display needs to be calibrated for each input separately. See brief notes on calibration discs here:[had to delete URL cause system won't let me post URLs since new user - Shoebobs]How is the DVD player connected to the display?

Note that some movies use distinct color grading for effect: LOTR is a pretty severe example, especially in the first two films.

-Bill

Thanks for the info, I'm going to get a calibration disc. The DVD player is connected with component cables right now, as the HDMI cables are in the mail.

I don't want to hijack this thread so I'll post anymore questions about calibration I have in the LNT4069 owners thread/calibration thread.

Thanks again
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post #58 of 75 Old 02-18-2008, 02:24 PM
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OK guys here's my problem. I just bought a Samsung 71f 1080p native set. I already have a samsumg 480p combo dvd/receiver. I am not going to buy a new upscaling dvd player just for the HDMI, because my samsung dvd player has components anyway and I read that the TV will also upscale the image to the native 1080p of the set.

Question....I can output the sd dvd as 480i or 480p. So should I let the set convert the 480p signal to 1080p, or 480i to 1080p. Which process is considered the "proper method" with the least amount of changes to the original signal.

Could someone give me a walk-thru of how the 1080p set would treat each signal?

Thanks,

Rob O.
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post #59 of 75 Old 02-18-2008, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by vandelay101 View Post

OK guys here's my problem. I just bought a Samsung 71f 1080p native set. I already have a samsumg 480p combo dvd/receiver. I am not going to buy a new upscaling dvd player just for the HDMI, because my samsung dvd player has components anyway and I read that the TV will also upscale the image to the native 1080p of the set.

Question....I can output the sd dvd as 480i or 480p. So should I let the set convert the 480p signal to 1080p, or 480i to 1080p. Which process is considered the "proper method" with the least amount of changes to the original signal.

There is no firm rule. It depends on the gear. Try both. Which looks better?

Quote:


Could someone give me a walk-thru of how the 1080p set would treat each signal?

480i: the display deinterlaces 480i to 480p and then scales the 480p to 1080p.

480p: the player deinterlaces 480i to 480p and the display scales the 480p to 1080p.

-Bill
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post #60 of 75 Old 02-18-2008, 03:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vandelay101 View Post

OK guys here's my problem. I just bought a Samsung 71f 1080p native set. I already have a samsumg 480p combo dvd/receiver. I am not going to buy a new upscaling dvd player just for the HDMI, because my samsung dvd player has components anyway and I read that the TV will also upscale the image to the native 1080p of the set.

Question....I can output the sd dvd as 480i or 480p. So should I let the set convert the 480p signal to 1080p, or 480i to 1080p. Which process is considered the "proper method" with the least amount of changes to the original signal.

Could someone give me a walk-thru of how the 1080p set would treat each signal?

Thanks,

Rob O.

There is no rule here,and no device even nearly as sophisticated as the human eye. Try it both ways, in different conditions with diferent source materiasl. You might even want to play with the commercially available DVD set up discs that offer grids and test patterns but I wouldn't bother. You understand that one or the other does the de interlacing, so experiment to see which picture looks best. My guess? The display sounds newer and probably has a better deinterlacer-scaler than the combo unit. I put my money on the 480i signal looking the best, Barry. Let us know!

Barry
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