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post #1 of 16 Old 01-09-2012, 03:01 PM - Thread Starter
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Not sure if this is posted in the proper area?
Any Opinions on the best way to transfer old vhs to DVD?
I would imagine that I could just hook up an old vcr to the computer, copy the video to the hd and burn to DVD from there?

Thank you
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post #2 of 16 Old 01-09-2012, 07:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by av409 View Post

Not sure if this is posted in the proper area?
Any Opinions on the best way to transfer old vhs to DVD?
I would imagine that I could just hook up an old vcr to the computer, copy the video to the hd and burn to DVD from there?

Thank you

You've got a vivid imagination, although I guess if you wanted to reduce the process to one sentence that would suffice. My advice? Let Costco or some other large photo lab do it for you. Or if you really want to do it yourself use a DVD recorder.
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post #3 of 16 Old 01-09-2012, 08:08 PM
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+1

Check out the DVD recorder forum here. Lots of great info there. FWIW, I've converted hundreds of tapes to DVD with a DVD recorder. It's much quicker and easier than doing it on a computer, but not as easy as paying someone else to do it.
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post #4 of 16 Old 01-11-2012, 12:04 AM
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I use a JVC HM-DT100U DVHS vcr connected to a Panasonic E80H DVD recorder. It has a built in hard drive, so I can make clean edits before burning to DVD.

A computer may give fancier menus, but I find bypassing the computer avoids many potential problems.

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post #5 of 16 Old 01-11-2012, 07:19 PM
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A Panasonic DVD recorder with a HDD is the way to go, especially if you can play the VHS on a S-VHS machine and connect video to the Panny via a good quality S-video cable. The Panny has nice easy to use editing and chapter creation. Panasonic no longer sells their HDD recorders in the USA, but you can get the EH69 Canadian model easily enough on line, or buy a used USA model. The EH80 is a nice older model, though it burns at just 2X speed while newer models burn at something like 8X. This is all assuming we are talking home movies or other non-copyright material. If you VHS movies have macrovision don't waste your time - you are better off just buying the DVD.

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post #6 of 16 Old 01-11-2012, 08:48 PM
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When I transferred my Hi-8 home movies to DVD-R's as the finished product, I also made a second, raw transfer of the tape to a DVD-RAM disk. I love this solution, as it saves your source (warts and all) to disc. It saves the recording as one large file. I figure as technology, and my nonlinear editing and authoring skills improve (so I keep telling myself) I can go back to the raw recording and give it another shot!

So I burn and edit my video of the latest school concert to DVD-R, but the raw DVD-RAM is in a safe deposit box.

(Maybe using a secret underground Swiss bank is going overboard.)

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post #7 of 16 Old 01-12-2012, 09:32 AM
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If you only have a few tapes then take them to a video transfer shop, you can then rip the DVD on your PC and edit. It costs about $20 per tape for a basic DVD.

If you have a box full of tapes then buying a DVD recorder makes sense, just beware that tapes with Macrovision can't be copied.

There are cheap analog-to-USB devices that transfer video to your PC, they cost as little as $20.
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...ture%20Devices
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post #8 of 16 Old 01-12-2012, 06:47 PM
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Whether or not you oursource or DIY your video to DVD project has a lot to do with how much time you have vs. how much $$ you have (and how much you're willing to "pay" yourself to do it).

Most places charge around $20 a tape (we do). Bear in mind that certain Production companies encrypted old tapes, so if you're sitting around with your favorite Disney collection on VHS and you really want to convert them all to DVD, you're regrettably out of luck.

Whatever you do, it's definitely a good idea to get these digitized; VHS tapes degrade pretty quickly. At this point, given the point at which we really stopped using VHS, it's probably time (or past time) to preserve those memories.
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post #9 of 16 Old 01-18-2012, 08:07 AM
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for DIY if you have a lot of old family movies for instance (and you have the money), the Canopus ADVC300 is amazing. It's pricey though. I had one for awhile and sold it after I was done - only lost about 30% too.
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post #10 of 16 Old 01-19-2012, 01:19 AM
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Hmmm... IMHO using GVG hardware to process VHS home movies is a wee bit of overkill. A bit like chartering a jet to get across town.

When it became clear that the last high quality VHS deck would fall off the assembly soon, I picked up a top-of-the-line prosumer VCR to use for archival purposes. I looked for the following features:
  • "4 head" design to get the best off-the-tape signal at all speeds.
  • True S-VHS recorder that plays S-VHS recordings at full S-VHS quality and a video signal path that far exceeds standard VHS standards for best playback quality.
  • Support for all 4 VHS HQ modes.
  • Built-in full frame TBC with digital picture correction and full sync regeneration.
The idea here is to get the best possible video from the tape as early as possible, then re-clock the analog output for the best possible sampling consistency to the computer. Using an internal TBC or an external one that slaves the input sampler to the head drum (rare on VHS decks) works best.

I have a selection of video capture devices to choose from. IME even the cheap ones are fine for regular VHS. As long as you can save uncompressed or DV video files for times when you want to edit the content. internal cards or IEEE-1394 boxes are preferable to USB. An old DV camcorder with line in jacks for audio and video, and IEEE-1394 output can make a good capture device. They can convert to DV format in real time too! Likewise, a card with a hardware MPEG-2 encoder is great for saving movies and other stuff you don't need to edit.

All of the above is what you want to see in a shop that you pay to transfer your video tapes if you want a quality transfer. If you have a serviceable VCR, and a capture device or DV camcorder at home, you might want to try your hand at it before you spend the dough. Don't forget that for the cost of transferring one VHS movie to DVD-ROM, you may be able to pick up the DVD of the same film in the bargain bin or used.

I would avoid getting an all-in-one VCP/DVD recorder. Most are of poor quality, and the really good ones are still consumer products that are least likely to defeat Macrovision. Remember that if you bought the tape, you're entitled to back it up. That means you're entitled to defeat Macrovision.

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post #11 of 16 Old 01-19-2012, 02:59 AM
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I have a JVC HM-DH30000u DVHS deck with only about 20 hours use for sale, if anyone is looking for a good transfer deck. Somehow, I ended up with 3 DVHS decks over the years. IMHO, this deck was excellent in transferring VHS and SVHS analog to DVD. I ended up with two JVC HM-DH30000U units, and a JVC HM-DT100U.


The DT-100U is the one in my equipment rack for my dozen or so D-Theater movies and HD recordings I made around '04, before it was easy to archive HD. I can't remember the details, but I had a stripped down pc that booted from a CD-ROM and had a crazy fire wire connection. I have lots of music like PBS Soundstage. The main reason is that it has an ATSC tuner, so just connect your antenna, and you're ready to record OTA.

Info on the 30000u

http://support.jvc.com/consumer/prod...1&archive=true


Info on the DT100U

http://support.jvc.com/consumer/prod...1&archive=true

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post #12 of 16 Old 01-19-2012, 08:38 AM
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Don't forget that for the cost of transferring one VHS movie to DVD-ROM, you may be able to pick up the DVD of the same film in the bargain bin or used.

That's a good point, not to mention the PQ will be better. You are entitled to defeat Macrovision in the US but it can be a daunting task.

I assume the OP is talking about home movies but since he/she hasn't responded we will never know.
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post #13 of 16 Old 01-19-2012, 05:10 PM
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I'd guess home movies too, although I have some VHS movies that I had to buy because there was no DVD version available.

Today it's hard to believe it, but I used to time shift my TV shows using VHS tape, and still have some of the tapes. I used to edit together stuff to play at parties or give to friends. Somewhere there's a hilarious montage that I made from the Thanksgiving Day "Turkeys Away" episode--a rapid-fire juxtaposition of the Pink Floyd "Animals" album, the Hindenburg disaster, a real-life turkey festival in Arkansas and The Peter Principle. The punchline has a bedraggled and feathered Art Carlson exclaiming "As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly!!!" The unwritten, "truth is stranger than fiction" punchline is that turkeys actually can fly...well enough to make a safe landing at least. LOL

The full episode on Hulu

I'd love to have what was probably my best cuts-only editing work digitized!

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post #14 of 16 Old 01-26-2012, 04:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhoto View Post

Whether or not you oursource or DIY your video to DVD project has a lot to do with how much time you have vs. how much $$ you have (and how much you're willing to "pay" yourself to do it).

Most places charge around $20 a tape (we do). Bear in mind that certain Production companies encrypted old tapes, so if you're sitting around with your favorite Disney collection on VHS and you really want to convert them all to DVD, you're regrettably out of luck.

Whatever you do, it's definitely a good idea to get these digitized; VHS tapes degrade pretty quickly. At this point, given the point at which we really stopped using VHS, it's probably time (or past time) to preserve those memories.

To be perfectly accurate, macrovision isn't encryption. It is more like a flag that consumer electronics gear chooses to honor. Devices made for sale in other countries can choose to ignore the flag. Technically, Macrovision is a signal encoded in the oversacan area of the video track. It is up to each electronic device whether or not to take action upon that signal or ignore it.

There are ways around it, such as a DVD recorder that ignores the macrovision. I'm not aware of an easy source for these in the US, but I haven't looked for one in nearly 20 years.
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post #15 of 16 Old 01-26-2012, 03:40 PM
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If I remember, analog Macrovision slightly mangled some of the sync signals. A VCR could play it and most TV's were not affected (some would slightly 'tear' at the top). But, if you tried to record it, it would mess up the VCR's AGC circuitry, causing it to lose sync.

I assume many digital recorders can recognize that messy signal and will block recording.

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post #16 of 16 Old 01-26-2012, 10:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

To be perfectly accurate, macrovision isn't encryption. It is more like a flag that consumer electronics gear chooses to honor. Devices made for sale in other countries can choose to ignore the flag. Technically, Macrovision is a signal encoded in the oversacan area of the video track. It is up to each electronic device whether or not to take action upon that signal or ignore it.

There are ways around it, such as a DVD recorder that ignores the macrovision. I'm not aware of an easy source for these in the US, but I haven't looked for one in nearly 20 years.

To be completely accurate, Macrovision was a company that was granted patents for doing in essence things that would get a TV broadcaster's license revoked. They sold the somewhat dubious "right" to tamper with a NTSC signal to other companies for profit. You could call it legalized vandalism, except that it was still illegal. Non-enforcement doesn't make something suddenly become legal by default.

Something like this might be stretching the bounds of the meaning of "encryption", but after all the art of cryptography does employ false data (like the illegal not-sync pulses) and replacing one symbol with another so that only the key holder can decode it (like the illegal color burst signals). It has no flags or special flag reading circuitry. It relies completely on the ACG circuit design of legal VHS tape recorders for the bad pulse trick. Other recorders using different input circuits were unaffected. The bad burst trick affected all NTSC recorders. Maybe a PAL 60 VHS deck could handle the bad burst, but other than that the bad burst trick may as well have had vendors selling blank tapes as movies.

Needless to say, the Macrovision tricks broke numerous laws. But in a time of deregulation in the US there was no law enforcement to prosecute them. In other words "might makes right."

By the time that Americans willingly gave up liberty in return for the illusion of security with the DMCA, VHS was all but dead. By then anything could be sold as a video DVD, and consumers had no recourse.

One Macrovision product that is known only to satellite ground station operators used an encrypting digital frame buffer to re-order the picture information into a pseudo-random pattern that was unviewable without the unlocking code. This was true encryption, not "scrambling" since it used encryption codes and, unlike scrambling which is meant to do permanent damage, the output from the Macrovision decoders had to be legal to broadcast.

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