When will allow Netflix streaming allow watching new movies? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 07:25 AM - Thread Starter
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When will allow Netflix streaming allow watching new movies?

I have been using Netflix since its beginning for renting Dics. Idea: to watch new releases. When Netflix introduced streaming I was a subscriber but then discontinued because there was no meaningful content.
I recently re-subscribed to streaming with the idea to watch certain shows. At the same time I was hoping that I could watch some new movies. I was disappointed that this is still not possible. I am assuming this has to do with keeping there streaming rates that low. On the other hand they could implement a plan with streaming if you have a disc subscription (e.g. stream only three releases a month or so).

Am I missing something?
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post #2 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 09:33 AM
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Netflix has shunned getting into the pay per view business since it launched it's streaming service. They've never given any more of a detailed reason why, just that there were other ppv outfits available that a consumer could turn to.

Netflix streaming and all the other monthly subscription services are simply pay tv channels-but without the channel part. They fall into this category due to charging a subscription fee and not selling ads. Studios sell content based on what kind of service you are, PPV, Pay tv, basic cable, and local broadcast tv, ad supported or commercial free... New or recent content is made available to pay tv channels/streaming services several months after home video release, usually 6 months though that length is shortening for a handful of titles.

Since the early 80s, pay channels have engaged in locking up studios under exclusive contracts, granting them access to recent theatrical movies which blocks competitors from luring away subscribers by offering the same content. You aren't finding lots of recent newer films on Netflix due to this. Plus all of the pay services being owned by those studios or the parent companies of those studios. While the pay tv exclusivity window typically lasts for 5 years (after which the studio can then sell to other services), Netflix's success caused irrational jealous reactions to the point where the studios began actively not selling them titles that get moved from the initial pay tv exclusivity window. They will license their content to other pay tv outlets, disregarding the fact that those other outlets also competes against theirs.

The content of the 6 major studios are tied up with the following pay tv services:
Recent release theatricals
HBO, has its corporate sibling Warner Bros, 20th Century Fox, and Universal
Showtime (owned by CBS) has CBS Films and some Weinstein Company titles
Epix, owned by Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM, has their parents movies
Starz currently has Sony/Columbia pictures. They've just been bought by Lionsgate, and while LG films will remain on Epix, you can expect that to change when LG's contract with Epix comes up for renewal, especially since Lionsgate plans to sell their stake.
Netflix currently has a 3 year deal with Disney which Disney will not be renewing in 2019-they with be launching their own subscription streaming service.
Amazon Video-Epix licenses a package of movies they control to Amazon, as well as cable systems' VOD services.

Smaller production companies are also locked in exclusive deals amongst these outlets.

And that's pretty much where we are.
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post #3 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 10:47 AM
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Am I missing something?
Amazon Video - is what you're missing. You pay per title for the new stuff.
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post #4 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by metropole View Post

Am I missing something?
You are missing the fact it's not up to netflix as to allowing new movies to stream, it's up to movie studios. And they apparently like the current model, pay per movie rental. So either Netflix could go the amazon/vudu route, and you pay $5+ per movie to stream, or you simply rent discs. Or they could tack on $15 or so to your rate if you want to get 3 new streaming movies a month... but I guess financially it doesn't make sense to them. Not sure if it makes sense to consumers either.

Renting discs is still the most affordable and best way to watch new movies. And I think it's the only division of netflix that makes money, albeit it's a dwindling amount.

Netflix isn't like a miracle, "watch new releases" type of site. It simply wants to become HBO in the streaming world. And HBO doesn't release brand new movies either.
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post #5 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 11:21 AM - Thread Starter
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Or they could tack on $15 or so to your rate if you want to get 3 new streaming movies a month... but I guess financially it doesn't make sense to them. Not sure if it makes sense to consumers either.
This what I would expect. Seems easy for a tech company to implement.

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Renting discs is still the most affordable and best way to watch new movies. And I think it's the only division of netflix that makes money, albeit it's a dwindling amount.
I also realize that for image and sound quality the discs are still best.


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Netflix isn't like a miracle, "watch new releases" type of site. It simply wants to become HBO in the streaming world. And HBO doesn't release brand new movies either.
Which is true for TV shows as well. Both Netflix and Amazon get quickly boring after catching up with some shows that I missed in the past. What is annoying that I can sometimes only watch 1 or 2 seasons and there is no reasonable way to pay for more.
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post #6 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 11:25 AM - Thread Starter
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Amazon Video - is what you're missing. You pay per title for the new stuff.
Probably a better deal. $3.99 per rental? Probably still a better deal than Netflix discs for the amount I am watching. If only they had same sound/video options as discs it woudl be a no-brainer.
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post #7 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 12:02 PM
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Which is true for TV shows as well. Both Netflix and Amazon get quickly boring after catching up with some shows that I missed in the past. What is annoying that I can sometimes only watch 1 or 2 seasons and there is no reasonable way to pay for more.
Agreed, the streaming side of things does get boring after you watch whatever shows/movies you want. At least amazon has extra benefits outside of streaming. And you can just pay amazon for new seasons if you want... of course it gets rather expensive then.

Personally I still go with bluray rentals, as besides the improved quality, if you watch at least a movie a week, it makes more sense money-wise -- $12 month for 1-2 movies/week on bluray. Paying for the same amount of rentals would be more than that, for worse quality.
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post #8 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 12:27 PM
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Posts like this often are a gauge of how well people understand the industry. Netflix was based on Hasting not liking a penalty when he returned a video late to Blockbuster. Of course Blockbuster didn't have any "movies still in the theaters". VUDU has had a "before it's in theaters" or "in theaters" section probably since I first used them years ago. Those aren't blockbusters though but usually indies and foreign. This was something that took place as art houses started going out of business and a venue was needed for these films.

Note last year there was mention of a rental service for big films .... at prices only the rich can afford.
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post #9 of 10 Old 08-13-2017, 03:44 PM
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I'm surprised the studios haven't considered an option to offer monthly, limited video streaming plans as an alternative to DVD/BD rentals. Similar rules and pricing would apply. IE: 28 day delay for the latest titles, eight video limit streaming plan per month, would come to about 16 bucks give or take.

Ian

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post #10 of 10 Old 08-14-2017, 12:15 PM
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I'm surprised the studios haven't considered an option to offer monthly, limited video streaming plans as an alternative to DVD/BD rentals. Similar rules and pricing would apply. IE: 28 day delay for the latest titles, eight video limit streaming plan per month, would come to about 16 bucks give or take.

Ian
Remember Verizon/Redbox? That didn't seem to work. Of course I don't think they got access to some of the newer video releases that Redbox gets. I still rent from RB watching what studio a film is from so I don't rent something that in a month or two will show up on Netflix. I occasionally will rent a streaming version of new release. The studio schmucks still think they should charge a lot more for UHD streaming though even though those disc prices are now about BD level.
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