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post #421 of 430 Old 02-05-2010, 10:59 AM
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There's not as much CGI in the Batman movies as you would think. Nolan prefers to use real stuff. The special features in the movies are pretty good, especially the parts with The Tumbler and The Batpod. They're both real vehicles.
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post #422 of 430 Old 02-06-2010, 08:49 AM
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I just watched it yesterday and really enjoyed the movie, but I found myself looking at my watch a lot the last 35 minutes.
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post #423 of 430 Old 02-06-2010, 07:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyfan88 View Post

I just watched it yesterday and really enjoyed the movie, but I found myself looking at my watch a lot the last 35 minutes.

I did the same thing. Way over the top ending that seemed to never end.

I much preferred the first one.
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post #424 of 430 Old 02-19-2010, 10:41 PM
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Hello,
Nice review post for the dark night blue ray disk...
thanks

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post #425 of 430 Old 02-28-2010, 11:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jackportd View Post

Hello,
Nice review post for the dark night blue ray disk...
thanks

Greetings,

Thank you..


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post #426 of 430 Old 04-03-2010, 02:38 PM
 
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I know very little about aspect ratio so I maybe to asking this question in the wrong forum. Problems with blu rays is
\\
\\

1. with all the technology, why can't they make all blu ray movies to fit your entire screen. even when i use wide fit on some of my blu rays, i still can't get the movie to fill the entire. i bought a 52" and i want to use and see all the screen filled. black boxes couldn't be healthy on the life of a LCD.

2. Most blu rays i have cut the heads off of the actors like a kid taking a still shot. What is being done to fix this . This is my biggest complaint of blu's.
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post #427 of 430 Old 04-03-2010, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by bigmac31391 View Post

I know very little about aspect ratio so I maybe to asking this question in the wrong forum. Problems with blu rays is
\\
\\

1. with all the technology, why can't they make all blu ray movies to fit your entire screen. even when i use wide fit on some of my blu rays, i still can't get the movie to fill the entire. i bought a 52" and i want to use and see all the screen filled. black boxes couldn't be healthy on the life of a LCD.

2. Most blu rays i have cut the heads off of the actors like a kid taking a still shot. What is being done to fix this . This is my biggest complaint of blu's.

http://www.widescreenadvocate.org/widescreenprimer.html
http://www.widescreen.org/
http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articl...reenorama.html
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post #428 of 430 Old 04-03-2010, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigmac31391 View Post

I know very little about aspect ratio so I maybe to asking this question in the wrong forum. Problems with blu rays is
\\
\\

1. with all the technology, why can't they make all blu ray movies to fit your entire screen. even when i use wide fit on some of my blu rays, i still can't get the movie to fill the entire. i bought a 52" and i want to use and see all the screen filled. black boxes couldn't be healthy on the life of a LCD.

2. Most blu rays i have cut the heads off of the actors like a kid taking a still shot. What is being done to fix this . This is my biggest complaint of blu's.

Older CRT screens could experience uneven wear of the phosphors: if one part of the screen was seldom used, it might be brighter than the rest when it was used on occasion. This problem does not affect current CRTs and has never affected LCDs. Don't worry about that.

Videotapes mostly used the 4:3 aspect ratio of old-style television (in modern typology, "1.33:1").

DVDs gave the buyer of a film a choice of buying a disk that showed the original film's aspect ratio ("Widescreen") or one that had a crop from center of the fim image to fill a 4:3 tv screen ("Fullscreen").

Those who wanted see the film the way the director intended it to look put up with the black bars above and below the movie. (This was commonly called "letterboxing" because its shape reminded the person who coined the phrase of a roadside household mailbox.) Those who wanted to use every inch of their screen gave up whatever surrounding details that the director might have included to create the sense of place - and sometimes to give clues about what was going one.

Blu-ray disks don't come in "Fullscreen." They are all Widescreen, in the original aspect ratio of the film. They range from the ultra-widescreen 2:35:1 to the 2.2:1 popularized by Stanley Kubrick to the currently popular 1.78:1, most often referred to as "16:9."

Most new sets have a 16:9 screen, so films made in that exact ratio will exactly fit. Wider aspect ratios will still require some black bars above and below, but since the screen is wider than an old-style tv, the black bars don't have to be as tall.

Of course, on a 16:9 screen, classic tv is now not wide enough to fill the screen, resulting in black bars on either side, which has been dubbed "pillar boxing." (When a broadcaster puts a 4:3 image into a 16:9 high definition channel, the pillars may carry station logos rather than being black.)

If you zoom in on a pillar-boxed image to fill the screen horizontally, you'll make the image taller than the screen. That's why the actors' heads are cut off.

There's another way to make a pillar-boxed image fill the screen: you could stretch it horizontally. That's fine if you don't mind turning circles into ovals and making everyone look fat.

You may have the same pair of choices with a 2.2:1 or 2.35:1 film to eliminate the horizontal black bars above and below: you could zoom in on it and make it fill the screen vertically, while losing parts of the image off both sides, recreating the Fullscreen problem, without the mitigating virtue of having a film editor choosing what part of the image to zoom in on and panning from side to side as appropriate.
On the other hand, you might be able to stretch the image vertically, making circles into ovals standing on end and making everyone look anorexic.

Or you could simply not play around with your controls once you get them to show circles properly (using a setup disk like Digital Video Essentials) and accept that different films are supposed to be different shapes. No harm will come to your monitor.

If you want to see the image bigger, get a bigger set - or a video projector. These days, a high definition video projector that can throw an image big enough to fill a wall can cost less than a large screen tv. Think about it.

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post #429 of 430 Old 04-04-2010, 12:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philnick View Post

Older CRT screens could experience uneven wear of the phosphors: if one part of the screen was seldom used, it might be brighter than the rest when it was used on occasion. This problem does not affect current CRTs and has never affected LCDs. Don't worry about that.

Videotapes mostly used the 4:3 aspect ratio of old-style television (in modern typology, "1.33:1").

DVDs gave the buyer of a film a choice of buying a disk that showed the original film's aspect ratio ("Widescreen") or one that had a crop from center of the fim image to fill a 4:3 tv screen ("Fullscreen").

Those who wanted see the film the way the director intended it to look put up with the black bars above and below the movie. (This was commonly called "letterboxing" because its shape reminded the person who coined the phrase of a roadside household mailbox.) Those who wanted to use every inch of their screen gave up whatever surrounding details that the director might have included to create the sense of place - and sometimes to give clues about what was going one.

Blu-ray disks don't come in "Fullscreen." They are all Widescreen, in the original aspect ratio of the film. They range from the ultra-widescreen 2:35:1 to the 2.2:1 popularized by Stanley Kubrick to the currently popular 1.78:1, most often referred to as "16:9."

Most new sets have a 16:9 screen, so films made in that exact ratio will exactly fit. Wider aspect ratios will still require some black bars above and below, but since the screen is wider than an old-style tv, the black bars don't have to be as tall.

Of course, on a 16:9 screen, classic tv is now not wide enough to fill the screen, resulting in black bars on either side, which has been dubbed "pillar boxing." (When a broadcaster puts a 4:3 image into a 16:9 high definition channel, the pillars may carry station logos rather than being black.)

If you zoom in on a pillar-boxed image to fill the screen horizontally, you'll make the image taller than the screen. That's why the actors' heads are cut off.

There's another way to make a pillar-boxed image fill the screen: you could stretch it horizontally. That's fine if you don't mind turning circles into ovals and making everyone look fat.

You may have the same pair of choices with a 2.2:1 or 2.35:1 film to eliminate the horizontal black bars above and below: you could zoom in on it and make it fill the screen vertically, while losing parts of the image off both sides, recreating the Fullscreen problem, without the mitigating virtue of having a film editor choosing what part of the image to zoom in on and panning from side to side as appropriate.
On the other hand, you might be able to stretch the image vertically, making circles into ovals standing on end and making everyone look anorexic.

Or you could simply not play around with your controls once you get them to show circles properly (using a setup disk like Digital Video Essentials) and accept that different films are supposed to be different shapes. No harm will come to your monitor.

If you want to see the image bigger, get a bigger set - or a video projector. These days, a high definition video projector that can throw an image big enough to fill a wall can cost less than a large screen tv. Think about it.

OK ! I think I understand ! Wide screen shows more.
I have not been to the movies in a long , long time but I assume actors heads are not cut off. I love blu's and want to add to my collection.
What ratios can i buy that do not cut off the actors heads. I can live with the letter boxes. i just can stand seeing the actors heads cut off. surely that are not cut off at the theaters. thanks for understanding and i may be asking for something that is only reserved for the theaters. MIKE
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post #430 of 430 Old 04-04-2010, 03:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Greetings,

This isn't the proper forum for an extended Q&A on aspect ratios. There are plenty of answers that can be found here on the site or by using a search engine such as Google.


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