How to clean up drywall dust? - AVS Forum
Dedicated Theater Design & Construction > How to clean up drywall dust?
huntrm's Avatar huntrm 09:42 AM 04-14-2008
Drywall is done throughout entire basement. They sanded, and cleaned up, but there's still some on the walls and floor.

I'm thinking of using an electric blower but that may create a bigger mess. Blow the walls, then blow everything into a corner, then shopvac it up.

Other idea was to use a swiffer and clean the walls off.

Thoughts/experience?

BIGmouthinDC's Avatar BIGmouthinDC 09:52 AM 04-14-2008
FORGET THE BLOWER!!! vacuum the walls with the floor attachment for your shop vac. You will need to clean the filter periodically. Then roll on a coat of drywall primer. The primer will bind what is left on the wall.

Mop the floors with a damp mop.
huntrm's Avatar huntrm 10:01 AM 04-14-2008
That's a good option, just time consuming versus big bad ass electric blower creating all sorts of havoc!!! :-)

The stuff is insidious, already making its way into the main floor of the house.
mmb's Avatar mmb 10:04 AM 04-14-2008
You may also want to look at a finer filter for your shop vac that was made for fine dust. Otherwise you'll just end up blowing it back out the shop vac outlet and may ruin the motor system will the dust. It's bad stuff for motors.

They also have special water filters for drywall that you can build out, but chances are you don't have enough area to warrant the cost of a one time use item like that. I built one out of a 6 gallon bucket, extra vac hose, a piece of PVC and duct tape.

Take the lid of the bucket and cut two holes in it. Use the PVC to extend towards the bottom of the bucket and connect the vac hose that you will be using to suck up the dust. Connect the other hose to the second hole in the bucket and to in intake on the vac. Fill bucket with water so that it covers the PVC hose side but the vac line is NOT in the water. Close the lid so that it is air tight and turn the vac on.

This will create low pressure inside the bucket and draw air in from the bush end of the hose, making the dust bubble into the water and there by catching some of it before it makes it to the vac. Really helps if you have a strong shopvac.

You may be able to rent one from a construction tool rental, I'd look under drywall water filter.


Edit: Looks something like this


pmeyer's Avatar pmeyer 10:34 AM 04-14-2008
For the floor:

1) Sweep
2) Cover with 3/4" plywood




(I also used a normal floor vacuum, going through multiple bags)
imprez25's Avatar imprez25 10:55 AM 04-14-2008
I use a shop-vac with a fine particle bag and a standard floor vac with a removable/washable heppa filter, (on a concrete floor, I follow this with a mop and bucket)to clean the floor. This has always worked well for us. As for cleaning the walls I use a sponge and a bucket of water to wipe them down. replacing the water after about every sheet of drywall or so. Of course you should clean the walls first, so as the dust falls to the floor you only need to vac once.
Vcook's Avatar Vcook 11:05 AM 04-14-2008
shop vac. when the filter is clogged take it outside and beat it mercilessly, preferably in the neighbors yard.
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar BIGmouthinDC 11:37 AM 04-14-2008
I always keep two fine particle filters for my shop vacs. One in use and one that I rinsed off with a hose and is drying. I just keep exchanging them. Be sure it is dry before replacing.

No need to beat the things, just aim and fire.
Staffy's Avatar Staffy 12:26 PM 04-14-2008
In my garage, I used a shopvac, then mopped. For the walls I used a damp large sponge drag over the sheetrock with only ONE LIGHT PASS. Let it dry and the next day I primered. I held just 1 side of the sponge and almost used it like a squeegee but again very light.
Kevin_Wadsworth's Avatar Kevin_Wadsworth 02:24 PM 04-14-2008
Regular HEPA vacuum for the walls and floors, followed by drywall primer on the walls. It helped that the sanders they drywall crew used were hooked to shop-vacs. Greatly cut down on the dust in the house.
BShaw@BedHandles's Avatar BShaw@BedHandles 06:45 PM 04-14-2008
You absolutely need a "drywall filter bag" for your shopvac. I've been using them for years and WOW! do they ever work great. I've tried all the rest; not even close. Ok, they're $6 each - but worth every penny. They hold a ton of gypsum dust and don't leak and don't clog till they're full; really full. The only thing I don't know is how they do it! Normal vacs just clog in a New York minute. Just don't be fooled by HD because they don't have them. They are made with yellow paper on the outside and specifically say "drywall filter bags". I found mine at a local hardware store.

LL
RPh Drew's Avatar RPh Drew 08:04 PM 04-14-2008
Shop vac and with proper filter... done.

Then I went down to the local grocery store that rents Rug Doctors and rented one for a day... $20 well spent. You don't need any soap or chemicals just fill with water and go to town. After vacuuming like crazy with the shop vac and cleaning the filter 10 times the Rug Doctor still picked up tons. Wish I would have wasted so much time with the shop vac and went right to the Rug Doctor.
Staffy's Avatar Staffy 08:53 PM 04-14-2008
When I do my room, I will be laying plastic down and taping it to the concrete
imprez25's Avatar imprez25 08:16 AM 04-15-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by BShaw@BedHandles View Post

You absolutely need a "drywall filter bag" for your shopvac. I've been using them for years and WOW! do they ever work great. I've tried all the rest; not even close. Ok, they're $6 each - but worth every penny. They hold a ton of gypsum dust and don't leak and don't clog till they're full; really full. The only thing I don't know is how they do it! Normal vacs just clog in a New York minute. Just don't be fooled by HD because they don't have them. They are made with yellow paper on the outside and specifically say "drywall filter bags". I found mine at a local hardware store.

exactly! Don't even think of using the white bags, drywall dust will just blow through them. I think Menards sells them for $8 for the two pack, if you have an Menards near you.
Chuck1906's Avatar Chuck1906 06:48 PM 06-11-2008
A friend of mine from work let me borrow his "AQUA AIR" pictured in post #4 today and even though the sandpaper is real fine, that thing kept taking the compound down to my tape causing me to re-spackle again! I love how there is no dust emissions in the air though. I don't know if I am using it incorrectly or what.

I have 12 holes that I needed to patch up in my room. Since the weekend, I have put 3 coats of compound over the holes. Each coat, I scraped off as much as I could to make the surface as smooth as I could get it. Once it dried and I went to sand it, it seemed like I was taking it down right down to the adhesive tape!
Don_Kellogg's Avatar Don_Kellogg 06:51 PM 06-11-2008
Lots of vacuuming, mopping and repeating. It takes for ever...
tonybradley's Avatar tonybradley 07:08 PM 06-11-2008
I'm not sure what it's called, but I purchased that bag of what looks like fine damp mulch that you throw around the concrete floor, then take a push broom and sweep it up. The damp mulch type stuff in the bag bonds to the drywall dust so you get no dust flying around the room. I tried a shop vac and when the filter was compacted, and didn't realize it, I turned around and saw the vacuum blowing out the drywall dust out the other end back into the room. Anyway, I found it super easy with the mulch stuff and it was a quick clean up, and did incredible.
mscott's Avatar mscott 04:13 PM 06-14-2008
That Aqua-Air can also be used to help relax you after a hard days work in HT construction.
Chuck1906's Avatar Chuck1906 05:07 PM 06-14-2008
I bought the drywall filter bag for my shopvac yesterday and boy what a difference it made. Nothing went flying out the back this time!!! I took someone's advice and vacuumed the walls and ceiling too! LOL!
Don_Kellogg's Avatar Don_Kellogg 11:17 PM 06-17-2008
I'm kinda back to this point thanks to my local rental. I decided to move my RS1 to the back of my theater. This of course required me to repair the previous mount. After fighting with so much dust for so long I decided to rent a drywall vac and dustless sander. Well long story short I turned the dustless sander on and dust went every where. They taped a few holes in the hose that attaches to the head. Boy was I pissed.
Renesis's Avatar Renesis 09:04 AM 06-18-2008
I could be wrong, but isn't this what primer is for? Just spray it over the dust (if it's not clumpy at all) and it will seal it all to the walls.
Omie Morris's Avatar Omie Morris 04:11 PM 09-20-2013
The Sand and clean filter is my recommendation as well. I have one and I use it when I sand sheetrock of course because that is what it was designed for. however I find my self using it to clean up even fine sanding dust. I recently remodeled a bath I had to use a belt sander to smooth over where the old 5/8 decking was thicker than the new 5/8 decking. It worked great for this as well.
doublewing11's Avatar doublewing11 04:30 PM 09-20-2013
And don't use your wife's Miele vaccum.................................after three weeks the vaccum squacked "mercy".

Boy did I eat dog food for a week! biggrin.gif

Use a shop vac!!!!!!
thedigitel's Avatar thedigitel 06:35 PM 09-21-2013
I just recently had my entire basement drywalled, and there was a lot of dust. What we did was simply sweep off the majority of the dust with soft-bristle brooms, and sprayed the primer on. Once dry, all that was needed was a quick sand to get rid of any remaining texture. I didn't see the point in spending hours getting every tiny bit of dust off when you can just sand it smooth once the primer is up.
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