What type of door should I get for good sound proofing? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 09:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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What type of door should I get for sound proofing? Can I find it at Home Depot or Fry's ? How much should they normally cost? Beside the door, should I do anything special to the door to make it even more sound proof? It is a single door.

Thanks.
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post #2 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 09:28 PM
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Solid core. The thicker and heavier the better....assuming you're framing is up to it. Just get a plain external door if thats too hard - but solid core.

Then add these:

http://www.raven.com.au/domino/raven...l-v/catalogue2

I'm pretty sure you can get them over in the US.

You want good hinges too.

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post #3 of 30 Old 09-14-2009, 05:59 AM
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It would you help if you told us about the rest of the room and how you sound proofed the entire space. Then we could make some recommendations that match the level of control you are aiming for.

A simple Masonite Safe and Sound solid core door (special order at big boxes) pre hung will be less than $150. Add some weather stripping and a floor sweep and you are done. Or it might be necessary to go with a more rigorous door if your overall design is at a higher level.
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post #4 of 30 Old 09-14-2009, 08:21 AM
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This is a question I to have been wondering my room is DD + GG everywhere i have acoustic panels on all of my walls. Is it best to make your own door somehow eg) 3 sheets of MDF for example or buy a door and what type?
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post #5 of 30 Old 09-14-2009, 08:25 AM
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It is more of a task than you might think to build a door. Easier to but a pre-hung solid core interior door, add seals and perhaps a MDF panel on the theater side

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post #6 of 30 Old 09-14-2009, 08:38 AM
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Ditto for thick, heavy solid core. But also make sure that it is a flush (uniformly thick) rather than panel door, as the latter can have pretty thin acoustical weak spots. And use tight gaskets all around, of course!

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post #7 of 30 Old 09-14-2009, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Montlick View Post

But also make sure that it is a flush (uniformly thick) rather than panel door, as the latter can have pretty thin acoustical weak spots.
- Terry

That's a great point, Terry

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post #8 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 04:39 AM
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What about something like this? Even though it's not technically "flush", it has "safe and sound" solid core and is more visually attractive.

http://www.masonite.com/product_feat...oldedPanel.php

Concerning sealing the door, anyone know of a solution similar to the Raven products solutions above, which appear to be only available in Australia?

Bob
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post #9 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 05:05 AM
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If I didn't take any special soundproofing measures, would a hollow core door be a weak link? Or is that matched to the rest of the room. Even if marginal, I'll go solid core.

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post #10 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 05:31 AM
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Bob those doors are on every interior door in my house. When I did my basement I ordered them to match. They are durable value solid core doors. From a pure soundproofing evaluation I would rate them as 5-6 on a 10 point scale. The door Dennis talks about below is probably a 10.
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post #11 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 05:34 AM
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Quiet Solutions has a door for this purpose ... all 430 lbs of door. A heavy "slab" door as Terry suggests with a good gasket/seal kit from Ted will be a good start. If you're at all handy, you can laminate a solid slab door with other materials (like MDF+Green Glue) and improve the performance. If you're not a DIY expert, I'd forget about building your own door or modifying a slab door.

We have our own millwork shop and have done this type of fabrication before ... but then again, we have the advantage of our own shop and experienced guys.

Our latest millwork fabrication (ceiling, not door)...
LL

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post #12 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 08:08 AM
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Maybe I should restate? My phrasing may have been confusing?

In a typical room without soundproofing measures, will a solid core door offer any benefit?

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post #13 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tony123 View Post

In a typical room without soundproofing measures, will a solid core door offer any benefit?

No sense getting a solid core door. There are dozens of other flanking paths (sound leaks) making the expense of a solid core door perhaps a waste.

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post #14 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 08:50 AM
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Thanks Ted! Appreciate your help.

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post #15 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine View Post

Quiet Solutions has a door for this purpose ... all 430 lbs of door. A heavy "slab" door as Terry suggests with a good gasket/seal kit from Ted will be a good start. If you're at all handy, you can laminate a solid slab door with other materials (like MDF+Green Glue) and improve the performance. If you're not a DIY expert, I'd forget about building your own door or modifying a slab door.

We have our own millwork shop and have done this type of fabrication before ... but then again, we have the advantage of our own shop and experienced guys.

Our latest millwork fabrication (ceiling, not door)...

That millwork rocks!

I would invest in a true sound "proof" door if I was in another house, where I could create a room-within-a-room type of construction. In my current house, I cannot do so, and don't want to spend too much money, yet would like to improve acoustic performance (doing DD+GG on certain walls/ceiling).

Any tips on how to modify a slab door? I think MDF with a simple (or no) design would be good, but how does one attach the MDF to a solid core door?

Bob
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post #16 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 09:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Bob those doors are on every interior door in my house. When I did my basement I ordered them to match. They are durable value solid core doors. From a pure soundproofing evaluation I would rate them as 5-6 on a 10 point scale. The door Dennis talks about below is probably an 10.


Great, and thanks for the information -- without it, I'd still be searching for doors. I've been looking for doors like this, and it's good to know I can special order these. I need two for the room I'm redoing.

Yes, they have some nice sound-proof doors, but they're $1,500 and up. That's worthwhile in certain applications, just not mine.

Bob
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post #17 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine View Post

Our latest millwork fabrication (ceiling, not door)...

That is very impressive, I'd love to see it in finished state (or at least with a finish applied). I get off on this stuff big time...(sad I know)...check out this site for more drooling if you appreciate this type of work.

http://www.emiandmauro.com/

There any specific acoustic/diffuser design in that ceiling or just for "looks"?

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post #18 of 30 Old 09-16-2009, 04:50 AM
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I think any repeated pattern will have an acoustic diffusion. Diffusion is related to frequency; if you knew some of the dimensions, you could determine what frequencies would likely be affected. Even with this knowledge, though, you'd have to know what sound actually impinges on the ceiling to see what, if any, benefit the ceiling would have. Given that there's not much direct impingement on a ceiling, I'd say this is primarily for looks.

Bob
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post #19 of 30 Old 09-16-2009, 07:44 AM
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It was recommended to me to get a solid-core interior door mounted on an outside threshold. This way it already comes with the seals. I think that it worked out pretty well, especially from a cost-effectiveness stand point.

CJ

PS- Dennis, that ceiling is amazing!

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post #20 of 30 Old 09-16-2009, 10:09 AM
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I just used exterior door with frame. Has weather strip all around and is solid. Works good for me.

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post #21 of 30 Old 09-16-2009, 10:12 AM
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I used a solid core door 2" thick, mounted on an exterior frame--so it seals pretty well. I otherwise have very good soundproofing--decoupled walls and ceiling, three layers of drywall w GG, etc. The door is clearly the weak link, but not terrible.

How deep is your entrance space? I used a double wall construction for the room, so I am considering adding another door (probably one with a glass window) on the "outer wall" portion of the entrance opening--allowing me to have a more attractive view into the room when I want the entrance to the room closed, but don't need the significant isolation that the solid door offers. I just find the room too isolated when my kids are in there and I am not--especially since I have boys who will soon be inviting over teenage girls

Although not offering significant benefit on its own, using a second door of some type should temper (even if ever so slightly) the airborn sound leaking through the solid core door when they are both closed. There will basically be a 6" air cushion between them, although some flanking will obviously occur.

If you really want to go nuts, do two facing solid core doors.

Good luck.
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post #22 of 30 Old 09-16-2009, 10:24 AM
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Great rundown. You have mass and seals. The lesson learned is that regardless of the door, a single door will always be the weak link.

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post #23 of 30 Old 09-16-2009, 11:54 AM
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Quote:


single door will always be the weak link.

Wot? You obviously haven't seen our 8 ton vault door.

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post #24 of 30 Old 09-16-2009, 11:55 AM
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Well that's true enough!

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post #25 of 30 Old 09-17-2009, 04:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dixon View Post

I used a solid core door 2" thick, mounted on an exterior frame--so it seals pretty well. I otherwise have very good soundproofing--decoupled walls and ceiling, three layers of drywall w GG, etc. The door is clearly the weak link, but not terrible.

How deep is your entrance space? I used a double wall construction for the room, so I am considering adding another door (probably one with a glass window) on the "outer wall" portion of the entrance opening--allowing me to have a more attractive view into the room when I want the entrance to the room closed, but don't need the significant isolation that the solid door offers. I just find the room too isolated when my kids are in there and I am not--especially since I have boys who will soon be inviting over teenage girls

Although not offering significant benefit on its own, using a second door of some type should temper (even if ever so slightly) the airborn sound leaking through the solid core door when they are both closed. There will basically be a 6" air cushion between them, although some flanking will obviously occur.

If you really want to go nuts, do two facing solid core doors.

Good luck.

In my next house, I plan on doing exactly that -- two doors facing each other. (Although with more than 6 inches, hopefully.) In the current house, I want something that'll come close to DD + GG + RSIC, but it doesn't have to be perfect. Since I plan on selling this house within two years, I want to make the space livable, but not perfect.

Of course, there are also real sound "proof" doors:

One set of doors

No price on these

Yet more

They range from around $1,500 to about $4,000 for a single door. Two of the cheaper ones back to back would probably not be a weak link at all, but then that's $3,000 just for doors.

Bob
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post #26 of 30 Old 03-28-2013, 10:18 AM
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I'm in the very early planning stages of a home theater and I was doing a little research on doors. My budget does not allow for thousands of dollars to be spent on doors. I was thinking about sealed Safe-N-Sound doors. Because I have a sump pump in the back of my theater, I will need a second door behind my planned screen wall for access to the pump in addition to the entrance door at the back of the theater. This area for the sump pump will be unfinished, so sound escaping through the door will have very little preventing it from reaching the family room directly above. I plan on using clips and channel, double drywall, green glue. My main concern is sound traveling up to the level above.

My question is, considering the doors are a weak point, is it a waste of time, effort and money to do clips and channel with double drywall and green glue? Will all my other efforts be wasted by the sound escaping through the doors? Because of my door situation, I don't want to invest all that time and money if I am going to see little benefit.
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post #27 of 30 Old 03-28-2013, 10:52 AM
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You want the heaviest door possible. This may help:
http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing-installation-manuals/sim-doors/

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post #28 of 30 Old 03-28-2013, 11:24 AM
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Thanks for the info, Ted - the link is definitely helpful!

I guess what I really want to know is how much the weak link of the door will effect the entire room. Lets say the STC of a 15 foot wall without a door is 50. If you add a standard sized door that has an STC of 30 to that wall, will it reduce the STC of the entire wall down to 30? Or would it be something more like 48? 45? Just trying to get an idea on how much a door can affect an entire wall.

Is the wall only as soundproof as it's weakest link?
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post #29 of 30 Old 03-28-2013, 11:51 AM
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You'll find a lot of guys here on AVS that have done exhaustive door systems and many that have a single door only. If the area outside the single door has a stairwell headed up, or major ductwork overhead, then you may be dissatisfied with a single door. You can also look to beef up that single door, or look at dual steel doors (low$$). All in the Door SIM.

The door can certainly limit performance, but impossible to say by how much as there are innumerable variables.

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post #30 of 30 Old 03-28-2013, 12:27 PM
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Thanks again, Ted.

A double door is possible on the entrance side, but not really in the back where the sump pump is. I could create a small hallway between the two doors at the entrance. The sump pump area is just a small area that would be about 3' x 6' of unfinished space - not really room for 2 doors there. Looks like I have some serious flanking issues that I would need to resolve. Beefing up the door with some MDF and adding some drywall/green glue to the spaces between the floor joists shouldn't be too expensive.

As I said before, I am in the very early planning stage - I'm really just trying to get an Idea of how much this undertaking may cost to see if it is actually doable. I'd hate to build a theater that I can't enjoy because the boss is always telling me to turn it down.
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