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post #1711 of 3106 Old 04-25-2012, 10:39 AM
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I love the red fabric panels, Mario!

Quote:


I can see it's going to be challenging to flush both set of jambs. Because you loose access to one side once the first jamb is installed. So shimming becomes an issue.

I haven't done this split-jamb thing so I'm just spitballing, here ... Maybe you could dry-fit the first jamb section using trim-head screws instead of nails, so you can take it down to fit the second section. You would probably want to glue the shims for the first section to the framing and to themselves (not to the jamb) so the first section will go in the same way when it's re-installed.

When you go to screw the hinges in place, you will save yourself a ton of aggravation if you're careful to exactly center the pilot holes. An off-center screw can easily push the hinge 1/16" away from where you intend, and if that happens to a couple of hinges you can have a heckuva time hanging the door.

I usually install the door handle with the door on the floor, rather than mounted in the opening. It just seems a little easier to work on when the door isn't swinging on hinges.

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post #1712 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 07:11 AM
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Mario,

What size staples are you using for your fabric?

I was looking at this at Amazon
Surebonder 9600
with
Arrow Fastener 508SS1

Not in the mood to drop $100 in a nice PC tool that i'll probably use a handful of times and the Surebonder seems to be a popular item for a very economical price
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post #1713 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 08:04 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

Mario,

What size staples are you using for your fabric?

I was looking at this at Amazon
Surebonder 9600
with
Arrow Fastener 508SS1

Not in the mood to drop $100 in a nice PC tool that i'll probably use a handful of times and the Surebonder seems to be a popular item for a very economical price

Larry,

Not sure if you ended up buying the Porter Cable Triple package like I did with Compressor, Nailer, Brad Nailer and Stapler. But that stapler uses the same 18 gauge staples as the link you provided.

My first frames I used 18 gauge staples on and it worked. But when I used those 18 gauge on MDF (near the edge) like I'll need to do on each side of the column, I could see the MDF breaking away. That's why I opted for the Porter Cable US58 like so many others are using. The 22 gauge staples are much thinner.

Also, I did notice you could faintly see the 18 gauge staples pulling the fabric a few inches in each direction. So I'd highly recommend getting the Porter Cable US58.


I went with these staples from Amazon.
1 "B & C Eagle 71/10 3/8-Inch by 22 Gauge Galvanized Staple (10,000 per Box)"
Tools & Home Improvement; $11.87

1 "B & C Eagle 71/12 1/2-Inch by 22 Gauge Galvanized Staple (10,000 per Box)"
Tools & Home Improvement; $12.99

You get 10,000 (22 gauge) staples for the price of 1,000 (18 gauge) - so you'll actually recoup your investment in staples.

BTW, Home Depot has the US58 on sale right now online for $89.

Use your Discover Card through ShopDiscover and you'll save another 5%.

Also, get used to dropping lots of $100 daily. My credit card line items look like: Menards, Menards, Menards, Lowes, Home Depot, Lumber, Menards, Menards, Lowes, Home Depot, etc.
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post #1714 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 08:12 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightp View Post

I love the red fabric panels, Mario!



I haven't done this split-jamb thing so I'm just spitballing, here ... Maybe you could dry-fit the first jamb section using trim-head screws instead of nails, so you can take it down to fit the second section. You would probably want to glue the shims for the first section to the framing and to themselves (not to the jamb) so the first section will go in the same way when it's re-installed.

When you go to screw the hinges in place, you will save yourself a ton of aggravation if you're careful to exactly center the pilot holes. An off-center screw can easily push the hinge 1/16" away from where you intend, and if that happens to a couple of hinges you can have a heckuva time hanging the door.

I usually install the door handle with the door on the floor, rather than mounted in the opening. It just seems a little easier to work on when the door isn't swinging on hinges.

Thanks for the helpful info. I'm definitely in unchartered territory on this one. I'm having a bit of a challenge given the tight framed opening. There's not a lot of wiggle room to get one frame square and plumb let alone two. I like your idea, I just think I may need to do both simultaneously. Although really the only one that really matters is the jamb the door mounts to. The other one is more cosmetic.

Are there tricks of the trade to ensure you drive the nail straight?



Do I do the strikeplate last when the door and jamb is mounted?
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post #1715 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 08:39 AM - Thread Starter
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Got a bit more done on the door situation last night.

I installed the hinges on the door slab. I wanted to ensure the hinges were all equidistant from the edge of the door. So I grabbed my jig I made the other day to route the jambs. It happens that the hinge pin sits about 3/4" from the door. So my jig acted as a stop. One of my routed hinge holes was deeper than the rest which is why I needed to make sure they were all even.



I just screwed in 2 of the 4 screws thus far. I found it somewhat challenge try to get them screwed in perpendicular, straight and centered to the hole.



Next I layed the hinge jamb leg on top of the door and extended it an 1/8" over to leave room at the top. Then traced where the hinges landed. I also later remeasured just to be safe.

Then I routed the hinges out.



I did a test fit and it was nice a snug.



My two jambs were too long to fit between the double walls. So rather than ripping one of them, I made a grove cut (rabbet) along the inside of both jambs so they could almost interlock together. I made the cut a bit deeper so hopefully in the end they don't actually touch. It was just a bit over 3/8" deep and 3/8" wide. This should help me keep the two joints in line with each other but also allow me a bit of play between the two jambs. On top of that, I think it's better for sound proofing and keeping the two walls/jambs decoupled. I plan to use some acoustic caulk in between.







I screwed the extended jamb together.



One idea I have for mounting the two jambs is to put a small spacer (< 1/8") in between the jambs and then clamp them together so they become essentially one unit. Then shim them together and nail. Then just remove the spacer leaving the intended gap.
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post #1716 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 09:37 AM
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This is one area of my build (referring to jamb and door installation) that I have no clue. Thank you for providing how you are taking on this challenge.
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post #1717 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 09:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Also, get used to dropping lots of $100 daily. My credit card line items look like: Menards, Menards, Menards, Lowes, Home Depot, Lumber, Menards, Menards, Lowes, Home Depot, etc.

Ha...truer words have never been spoken. When I first started my build I thought there was a mistake on my credit card bill...I went to HD 22 times this month?!! Now I just check to see if I went anywhere other than HD.

The Esquire Theater Construction Thread:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1289590
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post #1718 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 11:04 AM
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Love the theater, can not wait until it is finished. Lots of detail.
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post #1719 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post


Ha...truer words have never been spoken. When I first started my build I thought there was a mistake on my credit card bill...I went to HD 22 times this month?!! Now I just check to see if I went anywhere other than HD.

If only those places took airmiles!!! Could have a few trips booked with all the miles by the end of a build.

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post #1720 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 02:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdika17 View Post

If only those places took airmiles!!! Could have a few trips booked with all the miles by the end of a build.

I travel a lot for work, and they pay for my annual fees on my Delta and United credit cards. The Delta is an AmEx card, and the United is Visa. I use the AmEx as much as possible since 95% of my flying is on Delta, but for places that don't take AmEx, I use the Visa. At least I get one dollar per mile. Not as good as some of the "cash back" cards, and not everything went on to the cards either, but just with basement (with theater) finishing, I am taking my family of 4 on vacation to California for a week with a full size rental car for the week (not quite enough points on the United one for anything better) and hotel paid for as well (not a cheepo either since they wanted to stay on the beach).

Sure, a chunk of those miles were from my normal travels, but you add in some big ticket items like bathroom fixtures and hiring a plumber (we relocated the underground plumbing in the basement)- BAM $6000, carpet - BAM, another $7000, new projector - KABAM $3000 (thanks AVS for an awesome price), Home theater seating, receiver, more speakers, acoustical treatments, so on and so forth... heck I ran almost 2000 feet of 12ga electrical wire at $80 for a 250 foot spool (should have shopped around more for that one). Add on that my city requires Arc Fault circuit breakers. I put in 8 breakers, replacing the original $6 ones for $40 AF ones. Ouch.

Or the $42 smoke detectors... All 3 of them just for the basement because they needed to tie into my other ones and code requires both ionization and photoelectric or whatever. Why not just one and I could have spent $11 each.

Oh wow, this is starting to turn into a gripe. Sorry, but you get the point, it IS expensive, and why not try to get some cash back, mileage points, hotel points, or something out of the expenditure. Heaven knows that as soon as your county finds out about your work, they will want to reassess your house and raise your taxes...
(down off of the soapbox again)
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post #1721 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 08:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Larry,

Not sure if you ended up buying the Porter Cable Triple package like I did with Compressor, Nailer, Brad Nailer and Stapler. But that stapler uses the same 18 gauge staples as the link you provided.

My first frames I used 18 gauge staples on and it worked. But when I used those 18 gauge on MDF (near the edge) like I'll need to do on each side of the column, I could see the MDF breaking away. That's why I opted for the Porter Cable US58 like so many others are using. The 22 gauge staples are much thinner.

Also, I did notice you could faintly see the 18 gauge staples pulling the fabric a few inches in each direction. So I'd highly recommend getting the Porter Cable US58.


I went with these staples from Amazon.
1 "B & C Eagle 71/10 3/8-Inch by 22 Gauge Galvanized Staple (10,000 per Box)"
Tools & Home Improvement; $11.87

1 "B & C Eagle 71/12 1/2-Inch by 22 Gauge Galvanized Staple (10,000 per Box)"
Tools & Home Improvement; $12.99

You get 10,000 (22 gauge) staples for the price of 1,000 (18 gauge) - so you'll actually recoup your investment in staples.

BTW, Home Depot has the US58 on sale right now online for $89.

Use your Discover Card through ShopDiscover and you'll save another 5%.

Also, get used to dropping lots of $100 daily. My credit card line items look like: Menards, Menards, Menards, Lowes, Home Depot, Lumber, Menards, Menards, Lowes, Home Depot, etc.

I did buy the PC triple pack and you're right it uses the same staples. Thanks for catching that I thought it used the smaller staples. Guess I'll look into the US58 I start getting a little closer
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post #1722 of 3106 Old 04-26-2012, 09:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post


...You get 10,000 (22 gauge) staples for the price of 1,000 (18 gauge) - so you'll actually recoup your investment in staples.

I didn't realize there was such a large difference in cost for the two types of staples. Since I am done building my frames I do not see a big reason to buy the 22 gauge stapler, but there is always next time. Don't tell my wife.

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post #1723 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 07:24 AM
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Your theater is looking awesome. What kind of acoustic treatment you have
behind the fabric panels and how thick?
Thanks.
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post #1724 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 08:22 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon_B View Post

This is one area of my build (referring to jamb and door installation) that I have no clue. Thank you for providing how you are taking on this challenge.

You bet Jon. I'm trying to give as much detail as possible in hopes of helping the next builder.
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post #1725 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 08:25 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji View Post

Ha...truer words have never been spoken. When I first started my build I thought there was a mistake on my credit card bill...I went to HD 22 times this month?!! Now I just check to see if I went anywhere other than HD.

The other day the employee at Menard's said I'm probably there more than he works there. I think that might deserve some type of preferred parking or something.

22x is a lot. I think I was probably at that level during the heat of the project. I counted my last statement and it was about 17 for local builder stores not including internet theater related purchases.

Maybe we are just poor planners.
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post #1726 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 08:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickbuol View Post

I travel a lot for work, and they pay for my annual fees on my Delta and United credit cards. The Delta is an AmEx card, and the United is Visa. I use the AmEx as much as possible since 95% of my flying is on Delta, but for places that don't take AmEx, I use the Visa. At least I get one dollar per mile. Not as good as some of the "cash back" cards, and not everything went on to the cards either, but just with basement (with theater) finishing, I am taking my family of 4 on vacation to California for a week with a full size rental car for the week (not quite enough points on the United one for anything better) and hotel paid for as well (not a cheepo either since they wanted to stay on the beach).

Sure, a chunk of those miles were from my normal travels, but you add in some big ticket items like bathroom fixtures and hiring a plumber (we relocated the underground plumbing in the basement)- BAM $6000, carpet - BAM, another $7000, new projector - KABAM $3000 (thanks AVS for an awesome price), Home theater seating, receiver, more speakers, acoustical treatments, so on and so forth... heck I ran almost 2000 feet of 12ga electrical wire at $80 for a 250 foot spool (should have shopped around more for that one). Add on that my city requires Arc Fault circuit breakers. I put in 8 breakers, replacing the original $6 ones for $40 AF ones. Ouch.

Or the $42 smoke detectors... All 3 of them just for the basement because they needed to tie into my other ones and code requires both ionization and photoelectric or whatever. Why not just one and I could have spent $11 each.

Oh wow, this is starting to turn into a gripe. Sorry, but you get the point, it IS expensive, and why not try to get some cash back, mileage points, hotel points, or something out of the expenditure. Heaven knows that as soon as your county finds out about your work, they will want to reassess your house and raise your taxes...
(down off of the soapbox again)

Nice...sounds like a great selling point to the wife. "I'm building these theater so we can fund our next vacation."
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post #1727 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 08:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Love the theater, can not wait until it is finished. Lots of detail.

Thanks. Yours was certainly inspirational.
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post #1728 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 08:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HSINGH View Post

Your theater is looking awesome. What kind of acoustic treatment you have
behind the fabric panels and how thick?
Thanks.

The initial plan was 3/4" denim behind the fabric panels.
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post #1729 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 08:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Here's a recap of last night's festivities.

I found using a larger nail set worked good for getting the screw started in the hinges. Using my drill to pre-drill just seemed to make it worse. So just a nail set and then screw driver. Oh, and a little wax on the screw to make it thread easier. Although I still managed to get a few blisters.

I finished putting all the screws into the door side hinges.


I elevated the door 1.5", then put a 1/8" board under the hinge side jamb to offset for the depth of the hinges. This put me right at about level so I could screw the hings right to the jamb to ensure they fit.



Like the door, I used a 3/4" board to space the distance from the face of the jamb to the pin side of the hinge. Same thing I did on the door.



I used an Irwin Door Lock Installation Kit that I bought probably eight months ago with the door to drill out all the holes for the handles.

Normally, you'd probably set the depth into the door at 2 3/4", but because I'm planning on moulding right on the door, I thought the 2 3/8" would look better.









So now the not so good news.

My first attempt at hanging the door jamb was a little crooked. So I realized I needed a bigger level. That'll be tonights next purchase. But I was still able to get the door on the hinges. That was a heavy door. I used three screws on the jamb...good tip from Dwight.

After mounting the door, I saw a fairly sizable gap on the latch side. Turns out it was 3/16". Which doesn't sound like much but it looked big. Turns out my hinges only have a 1/16" gap. So that extra 1/16" ended up on the latch side plus the 1/8" I initally planned for.

So I think the easiest think is to just take it all down and shave off a 1/16" on the header. That will leave me with an 1/8" gap on the right and still only a 1/16" on the hinge side. But I think I'd rather have it be a little to big than too small.






Another thing. I initally had them leave the drywall extend past the rough opening all around for sound proofing. But in hindsight, I have to shave it off in order to shim on both sides anyways.
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post #1730 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 10:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Do I do the strikeplate last when the door and jamb is mounted?

That's how I do it.

Quote:
After mounting the door, I saw a fairly sizable gap on the latch side. Turns out it was 3/16". Which doesn't sound like much but it looked big. Turns out my hinges only have a 1/16" gap. So that extra 1/16" ended up on the latch side plus the 1/8" I initally planned for.

So I think the easiest think is to just take it all down and shave off a 1/16" on the header. That will leave me with an 1/8" gap on the right and still only a 1/16" on the hinge side. But I think I'd rather have it be a little to big than too small.

Another way to handle this would be to put shims under the hinges. Take the door down, take the hinges off, and cut some thin shims to fit into the hinge dadoes. Screw the hinges back in place, trapping the shims between the hinge and the door, on one side, and between the hinge and the jamb, on the other (you would need to shim both sides to get to 1/16"). You can cut the shims from scrap wood using a table saw, or you could buy some veneer and use a couple of layers to make up the shim thickness you need.

The part of the jamb that's most important to get right is the hinge side. Once you have that plumb, hang the door and take a look at the gap between the door and the jamb at the top and on the handle side. Shim the top and handle side of the jamb until the gap between the door and the jamb is pretty much even all the way around.

Once you're satisfied with everything, remove at least one of the screws holding each hinge to the jamb and replace it with a longer (2"-ish) screw that will go through the jamb, through the shims and into the framing. This helps keep the door from sagging. Long screws made for this purpose are usually sold on the same aisle in the hardware store as the hinges.

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post #1731 of 3106 Old 04-27-2012, 05:03 PM
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Mario - great progress and looking good. I was surfing on Seymour screen website and they I'm seeing they admire your rendering work as well!

Mike
Started the build...Theater With A View
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post #1732 of 3106 Old 04-28-2012, 08:46 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightp View Post

That's how I do it.



Another way to handle this would be to put shims under the hinges. Take the door down, take the hinges off, and cut some thin shims to fit into the hinge dadoes. Screw the hinges back in place, trapping the shims between the hinge and the door, on one side, and between the hinge and the jamb, on the other (you would need to shim both sides to get to 1/16"). You can cut the shims from scrap wood using a table saw, or you could buy some veneer and use a couple of layers to make up the shim thickness you need.

The part of the jamb that's most important to get right is the hinge side. Once you have that plumb, hang the door and take a look at the gap between the door and the jamb at the top and on the handle side. Shim the top and handle side of the jamb until the gap between the door and the jamb is pretty much even all the way around.

Once you're satisfied with everything, remove at least one of the screws holding each hinge to the jamb and replace it with a longer (2"-ish) screw that will go through the jamb, through the shims and into the framing. This helps keep the door from sagging. Long screws made for this purpose are usually sold on the same aisle in the hardware store as the hinges.

Thanks as usual Dwight.

I'm actually using 2 1/2" screws now to secure the jamb already.

I ended up taking the jambs apart and cutting the header down by a 1/16th - fortunately I screwed the jambs together so it was pretty easy to do that.

I didn't want to mess around the hinges themselves for fear of getting them off and creating another problem. Shimming the hinge side is still an issue because I can't get the shims in there the way I'd like. But I think I'll load it up with screws since they will be hidden anyways.

Is it possible the screws will loosen up over time and the door will sag? You would think they would be stronger than finish nails.

I'm just using wood deck screws...does that matter?
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post #1733 of 3106 Old 04-28-2012, 08:48 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by misugrad View Post

Mario - great progress and looking good. I was surfing on Seymour screen website and they I'm seeing they admire your rendering work as well!

Yeah. That was an earlier version but very similar to what I ended up with.

I actually ordered my Seymour screen just this last week. I ended up going with a 2.35 - 136" Wide. I would have liked to have gone to 2.40 but the space didn't allow for it unless I actually shrunk the height of the screen which I didn't want to do. I plan to watch football games in there.
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post #1734 of 3106 Old 04-28-2012, 09:22 AM
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3/16" is typical for spacing around the door.

Any smaller and the door will need to be beveled (I know you talked about it earlier, not sure if you did it).

Also remember that the door will expand.

I'm very impressed with your woodworking skills, are you sure you weren't a carpenter?

For pre-drilling screw holes you need a self-centering drill bit. A day late and a dollar short, I know... But that is the only way to do it.
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post #1735 of 3106 Old 04-28-2012, 09:54 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Tim View Post

3/16" is typical for spacing around the door.

Any smaller and the door will need to be beveled (I know you talked about it earlier, not sure if you did it).

Also remember that the door will expand.

I'm very impressed with your woodworking skills, are you sure you weren't a carpenter?

For pre-drilling screw holes you need a self-centering drill bit. A day late and a dollar short, I know... But that is the only way to do it.

Hi Tim,

I'm back down to about an 1/8" gap on the latch side now that I shaved the header and it still appears to clear the jamb without issue. 3/16" did look pretty wide though from my eye compared to my other doors. But I did notice my other doors do have that 2 degree bevel on them.

Hopefully my efforts to make it tighter don't come back to bite me. The door has been sitting in the theater foyer for about 8 months. So I'm pretty sure it's acclamated to the room.

Ahh...I figured there was some type of tool to self-center. You learn something everyday around here. I've only got 6 holes left to do. Maybe just enough to add that tool to my arsenal.

I guess I can say I have experience in wood working after doing this project. I believe my years of experience in building 3D models has helped me out in the carpentry world. The tools are different and there's no UNDO option.
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post #1736 of 3106 Old 04-30-2012, 08:02 AM - Thread Starter
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I finally had some time on Sunday to get the jamb and door installed and completed.

I ended up using a 1x2 board on the hinge side screwed into the wall as my leveled straight edge. The one side of the hinge screws actually went into the 1x2 as well.

I also screwed some other temporary board guides into the wall that surrounded the door jamb so I wouldn't have to keep breaking out the level.

I used all 3" screws on the first jamb after shimming. Then ran a bead of soundproofing sealant along the joint that meets the other jamb.



I shimmed the two jambs on the latch side as if it were one unit.


I used 3" screws on the Door jamb side since it was going to be covered with trim. I used 16 gauge finish nails on the extension jamb.



The rabbet joint allowed me room to play to get the extension jamb flush with the foyer side wall.


I was happy with the gaps all the way around the door.


I ran another bead of soundproofing sealant inside the grove and then used a putty knife to scrape off the extra.




I'm glad to be done with this phase. Now I can finish up the lower MDF and trim that leads into the door jamb.

I took some spare 1/2" pad and the carpet sample. When the door swings out against the wall...it just barely touches the carpet. I had to add a very small scrap piece to the lower hinge in order to clear the carpet. I think if I just sand the bottom of the door, it will work out good without me need to cut off anything. It looks like my cement raises up about 3' out from the jamb. I'm glad I planned for 3/8" gap under the door. Any smaller and I'd need to cut the door down.

If I had to do it over again, I would have probably spaced the top hinge down 6" from the top and the bottom hinge 10" from the base of the door per the hinge instructions. Given the weight of the door, it might have made more sense. I matched my other foyer door which was 7" down and 11" up.
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post #1737 of 3106 Old 04-30-2012, 11:22 AM
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The split jamb turned out great, Mario! That was a really nice piece of work. As usual, very well thought out and executed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I'm actually using 2 1/2" screws now to secure the jamb already.

Is it possible the screws will loosen up over time and the door will sag? You would think they would be stronger than finish nails.

I'm just using wood deck screws...does that matter?

2-1/2" deck screws to secure the jamb to the framing are fine. However, I would still recommend that you replace one screw in each hinge with a screw that's long enough to go completely through the jamb, through the shims and an inch or so into the framing. Your long deck screws will keep the jamb from moving but the short screws that came with the hinges probably won't be enough to keep the hinges from loosening with repeated openings and closings of that heavy door over the years. Lighter hollow core doors don't cause near as much stress and don't need the longer screws. With a heavy solid core door, though, it's worth your time and your $2 to put in a couple of longer screws.

Quote:


For pre-drilling screw holes you need a self-centering drill bit. A day late and a dollar short, I know... But that is the only way to do it.

Here's an example of what Tim mentioned:



I have a set of these for different screw sizes. They sure do help, but it's still possible to get a screw off-centered. (Don't ask me how I know this ...)

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post #1738 of 3106 Old 05-01-2012, 01:54 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightp View Post

The split jamb turned out great, Mario! That was a really nice piece of work. As usual, very well thought out and executed.



2-1/2" deck screws to secure the jamb to the framing are fine. However, I would still recommend that you replace one screw in each hinge with a screw that's long enough to go completely through the jamb, through the shims and an inch or so into the framing. Your long deck screws will keep the jamb from moving but the short screws that came with the hinges probably won't be enough to keep the hinges from loosening with repeated openings and closings of that heavy door over the years. Lighter hollow core doors don't cause near as much stress and don't need the longer screws. With a heavy solid core door, though, it's worth your time and your $2 to put in a couple of longer screws.



Here's an example of what Tim mentioned:



I have a set of these for different screw sizes. They sure do help, but it's still possible to get a screw off-centered. (Don't ask me how I know this ...)

Thanks for the reminder on the longer hinge screws. I couldn't find any black and not sure if I could even track down the right size. I picked some longer wood screws up at Menards that looked about the same size. I'll have to do a test thread on a board to see if it's about the same. Then I'll just have to spray the top black.

Unfortunately the one set of screws on the hinges landed right on the drywall. But I can still get some of them into the 1x2 I added to the drywall.

I ended up just eyeing the center of the screws since I couldn't find any info on what size I needed.
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post #1739 of 3106 Old 05-02-2012, 09:10 AM - Thread Starter
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I finished adding the MDF to the lower wall leading up to the door jamb. And then continued putting the base, chair rail and moulding up.



I have one last fabric frame to build that surrounds the door jamb. If I want it to be seamless, I'm going to have to make a frame that is shaped around the jamb.
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post #1740 of 3106 Old 05-03-2012, 09:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

I finished adding the MDF to the lower wall leading up to the door jamb. And then continued putting the base, chair rail and moulding up.



I have one last fabric frame to build that surrounds the door jamb. If I want it to be seamless, I'm going to have to make a frame that is shaped around the jamb.

Are you going to frame the door first with moulding? And them make the fabric frame so that it fits around the door and frame moulding?
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