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post #31 of 53 Old 06-04-2011, 07:44 AM
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post #32 of 53 Old 06-04-2011, 11:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconDan View Post

With FR701 he thought that I could span the entire length of the soffits on the sides of my room (~19'-6") because of their width being 24" (I forget what he stated as the threshold for needing seams).

DD

I think the useable width of most GOM bolts is around 62", so if your soffits are 24" on both sides, you can do both with one order 7 yards of fabric. Not counting soffits in the front, back, or the walls. Order extra, I ran short on black by one yard, and had to order the minimum 5 yards. I still haven't figured out where I made the mistake. Best guess is I lost it in the inches used to wrap frames.

Mike

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post #33 of 53 Old 06-05-2011, 07:21 AM
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Thanks everyone for the excellent info on FabricMate. I was thinking about building frames, but now I'm convinced this is the way to go. Time to start framing soffits.

High Desert Theater - work in progress
Building Bass - Subs
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post #34 of 53 Old 03-18-2012, 06:09 PM
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Guys,

Sorry to resurrect an old thread but a quick question.

How do you handle in-wall speakers with these systems? Just cover the speaker with GoM or us the speaker grill on top of the Fabric system substrate?

Thanks

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post #35 of 53 Old 03-18-2012, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colleycol View Post

Guys,
How do you handle in-wall speakers with these systems? Just cover the speaker with GoM or us the speaker grill on top of the Fabric system substrate?

My surrounds and balancing subs will be in GOM wrapped MDF columns that are mounted to the sheet rock. I will be leaving the speaker grilles off with the face of the speakers against GOM (column MDF cut out for speakers).

DD
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post #36 of 53 Old 03-19-2012, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colleycol View Post

Guys,

Sorry to resurrect an old thread but a quick question.

How do you handle in-wall speakers with these systems? Just cover the speaker with GoM or us the speaker grill on top of the Fabric system substrate?

Thanks

Here is a before and after of my back wall. I used on-wall speakers for sides and rears, housed in framed columns and covered in GOM. I don't have any pics with the track in place. The columns are 8" deep from the wall to the front face of the framing, plus 1" of track. My speakers are 7" deep, so that leaves us 2" between the GOM and front of each speaker. I think one could get away with only an inch using GOM to be honest as it's so porous, i.e. you could just run the fabric right over speakers flush-mounted with the wall and have no issues.


DSC_6189 by matthewcummings99, on Flickr


DSC_9207 by matthewcummings99, on Flickr

This shows the front of the room. The columns you see at the edges are at 1st reflection points, approximately, for the 1st row. Porous absorption hidden behind these columns. Front 3 and 2 subs behind the AT screen.


DSC_9205 by matthewcummings99, on Flickr
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post #37 of 53 Old 03-19-2012, 08:42 PM
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Thanks for the replies.....

So did you use the core material? Might be a dumb question, just trying to figue this out.

I would go burgundy and black with a chair rail separating.

So I can flush mounted like lighting controls and outlets?




Quote:
Originally Posted by uscmatt99 View Post

Here is a before and after of my back wall. I used on-wall speakers for sides and rears, housed in framed columns and covered in GOM. I don't have any pics with the track in place. The columns are 8" deep from the wall to the front face of the framing, plus 1" of track. My speakers are 7" deep, so that leaves us 2" between the GOM and front of each speaker. I think one could get away with only an inch using GOM to be honest as it's so porous, i.e. you could just run the fabric right over speakers flush-mounted with the wall and have no issues.


DSC_6189 by matthewcummings99, on Flickr


DSC_9207 by matthewcummings99, on Flickr

This shows the front of the room. The columns you see at the edges are at 1st reflection points, approximately, for the 1st row. Porous absorption hidden behind these columns. Front 3 and 2 subs behind the AT screen.


DSC_9205 by matthewcummings99, on Flickr


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post #38 of 53 Old 03-20-2012, 04:55 AM
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I used the acoustically inert batting material for the upper panels (burgundy) and used Linacoustic behind the lower panels and along the front half of the ceiling. It was the ability to use core materials that drew me to the product in the first place. A side note, I was able to get Linacoustic cheaply from the builder, and also used 2 layers behind the false screen wall, with superchunk traps in the front corners. The ceiling false soffits all are lightly filled with pink fluffy insulation for additional bass trapping, as is the riser (with registers all around).

I thought about chair railing, but if you use this, you'll need to double up on the amount of track above and below the rail. Using the flat or beveled track gave the clean look I was going for much more easily.

For outlets and lighting controls, you'll have to raise it 1" from the drywall surface, and surround each plate with a small frame of track. This is a pain in the rear, as you have to be very careful about cutting a perfect hole in the fabric after perfectly aligning the track around each switch/outlet plate. All of my outlets are in the riser, or behind the screen, with the exception of one in a side column on the right side of the room that is mounted to the column framing. I have a Lutron keypad outside the room, which can be operated via remote control, iPhone, etc. For the lights, we pretty much cut the smallest holes allowable over the sconce boxes and can lights, and used included trim pieces to cover the edges.
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post #39 of 53 Old 03-20-2012, 07:18 AM
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Uscmatt, what was your approximate/ballpark cost to get the walls covered? I'm thinking of doing the same. Your theater looks fabulous by the way...nice color combo and very clean lines.
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post #40 of 53 Old 03-21-2012, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uscmatt99 View Post

For outlets and lighting controls, you'll have to raise it 1" from the drywall surface, and surround each plate with a small frame of track. This is a pain in the rear, as you have to be very careful about cutting a perfect hole in the fabric after perfectly aligning the track around each switch/outlet plate.

Thanks for the info.

This was what I feared. Having multiple outlets along the wall and having a PITA process on covering them.

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post #41 of 53 Old 03-21-2012, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colleycol View Post

Thanks for the info.

This was what I feared. Having multiple outlets along the wall and having a PITA process on covering them.

I took a different approach for my electrical devices. First I framed the hole with 1" furring strips. Then I covered the wall in fabric and at the electrical devices, I stapled the fabric all around the hole before I cut the hole in the fabric. Lastly, I used an 'old work' box to install my device. The disadvantage is if I ever had to remove the fabric, I probably wouldn't be able to reuse it. I only had to use this method on one small section where my light switch and thermostat is located (all receptacles are on columns), so this was a trade-off I was willing to make.
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post #42 of 53 Old 03-21-2012, 10:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eskay View Post


I took a different approach for my electrical devices. First I framed the hole with 1" furring strips. Then I covered the wall in fabric and at the electrical devices, I stapled the fabric all around the hole before I cut the hole in the fabric. Lastly, I used an 'old work' box to install my device. The disadvantage is if I ever had to remove the fabric, I probably wouldn't be able to reuse it. I only had to use this method on one small section where my light switch and thermostat is located (all receptacles are on columns), so this was a trade-off I was willing to make.

Can you guys post some pics for examples of the outlets and doorways?

Thanks so much for the help!

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post #43 of 53 Old 03-22-2012, 06:21 AM
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just completed an "Old School" fabric job, fabric stapled to wood furring all staples hidden.






Projection booth

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post #44 of 53 Old 03-23-2012, 11:33 AM
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WoW! Very nice!!

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post #45 of 53 Old 11-27-2012, 11:16 AM
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Thanks for the tip. Didnt know about the discount. I just called Ed and ordered my track.
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post #46 of 53 Old 12-29-2015, 11:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
just completed an "Old School" fabric job, fabric stapled to wood furring all staples hidden.<br><br><img alt="" src="http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b393/bigmouthindc/Ohio%202011/IMG_7606.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br><br><img alt="" src="http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b393/bigmouthindc/Ohio%202011/IMG_7582.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
Projection booth<br><br><img alt="" src="http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b393/bigmouthindc/Ohio%202011/IMG_7599.jpg" style="border:0px solid;">
Hate to bring this up from the past ... but I have been researching on how to retrofit my current painted drywall walls with some sort of fabric solution. The track systems look interesting, but I'm also fine with exploring fabric stapled to strips ... my question is, how do I hide the staples if I decide to go the DIY route? The design would be basically base board to ceiling and wall to wall, with cutouts for elec outlets and light switches.

I would have some exposed edges due to columns or other areas I don't (or can't) cover with fabric.

Is there a particular order to complete the various steps in?

Also, would there be a way to retrofit my existing wall sconces (which are currently flush with the drywall surface to bring them out to be on top of the new fabric surface? My main concern for this would be exposure of the fabric surface to a heat source.

Thanks,

Frank
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post #47 of 53 Old 12-29-2015, 03:35 PM
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Just fabric? Or acoustic treatment and fabric?

You do need a strategy for hiding staples if you go old school. There are a lot of tricks but I would need to see your room (pictures) to offer suggestions. Don't worry about the heat, unless you have really hot lights, in any case swap the bulbs for LED versions.
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post #48 of 53 Old 01-04-2016, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Just fabric? Or acoustic treatment and fabric?

You do need a strategy for hiding staples if you go old school. There are a lot of tricks but I would need to see your room (pictures) to offer suggestions. Don't worry about the heat, unless you have really hot lights, in any case swap the bulbs for LED versions.
Jeff, thanks for getting back to me. After doing some research, I found the electrical box extenders which would raise the outlets and lights to the proper position above the new fabric covering. So I think I am good there.

I would be using fabric and acoustical material (1/2 to 1"), the room itself was pretty well treated when it was originally built so I am happy with the level of external noise bleed.

Thinking about the panel construction, I've review a couple of your past builds and feel good about pre-building the frames, and then stretching the fabric over the frames, but where I get stuck, is how do I secure the frames to the walls without the fasteners being obvious?

The walls are all straight and the room itself is very rectangular in nature, so nothing difficult to deal with in that regard.

Thanks again for your assistance.

Frank
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post #49 of 53 Old 01-04-2016, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fjendra View Post
Jeff, thanks for getting back to me. After doing some research, I found the electrical box extenders which would raise the outlets and lights to the proper position above the new fabric covering. So I think I am good there.

I would be using fabric and acoustical material (1/2 to 1"), the room itself was pretty well treated when it was originally built so I am happy with the level of external noise bleed.

Thinking about the panel construction, I've review a couple of your past builds and feel good about pre-building the frames, and then stretching the fabric over the frames, but where I get stuck, is how do I secure the frames to the walls without the fasteners being obvious?

The walls are all straight and the room itself is very rectangular in nature, so nothing difficult to deal with in that regard.

Thanks again for your assistance.

Frank
Frank,

I just built the frames so they were very snug and friction fit. In one case, I used a bit of velcro to hold a corner that wasn't stay put attached to the molding (hidden). Then I attached velcro to the bottom of the frame so I could remove them if needed.

Check out:
The Cinemar Home Theater Construction Thread
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post #50 of 53 Old 01-04-2016, 08:36 AM
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there are a host of ways of attaching panels to walls, Finish nails shot through the fabric, Magnets, Glue, Velcro, Ball and socket speaker grill posts, Friction fit, Zclips, Impaling clips. I've probably used Friction and Velcro most often, followed by nails and glue. Magnets and ball and socket is just too much work for me.
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post #51 of 53 Old 01-06-2016, 07:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
there are a host of ways of attaching panels to walls, Finish nails shot through the fabric, Magnets, Glue, Velcro, Ball and socket speaker grill posts, Friction fit, Zclips, Impaling clips. I've probably used Friction and Velcro most often, followed by nails and glue. Magnets and ball and socket is just too much work for me.
Thanks for the help guys, I'll give that a try and post some pictures back when completed.
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post #52 of 53 Old 01-06-2016, 08:05 AM
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Hey guys, first time poster here. I'm considering ordering fabric mate for the first time, could anybody tell me how difficult it is to remove the fabric once installed? Can it be cleaned and reused or does removal mean cutting and buying new material? I will be using it to cover O.C. 703 on walls and for bass traps, and also just to make a false finished ceiling between soffits so I can get away with less drywall in a basement. Thanks!
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post #53 of 53 Old 01-06-2016, 10:08 AM
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