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post #1 of 590 Old 01-11-2010, 11:56 PM - Thread Starter
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I was planing to finish my basement with a dedicated home theater last year, but due to variety reasons, the build was pushed back until now. I am excited about my own build after years of lurking here and I am more excited to start my own thread. I plan do the most of work myself and I will definitely have a lot of questions to ask and advices to seek so I thank every one here in advance.

I finally pulled the permit before Christmas, I don't know typically how much you pay for the permit, but a cool $600 in my township to get building permit, plumbing permit, electrical and mechanical permit, that is expensive, they require construction diagram (floor plan), wall construction details with firblocking diagram, electrical diagram and plumbing raiser diagram. I got rejected the first time, after I submit couple more diagrams, I got approved.

My basement is about 1,000 sf, 33'x35' rectangular shape with 7'10" height, the theater space is roughly 14'x20'. My plan as many others here is to have two row of seating, first row 3 seats, second row 4 seats on a raiser, AT 1:2.35 CH screen, 7.2 system.

To help you visualize the space I am working on, here is few sketch ups.

The original space and layout


The theater room will be on the back side of the stair case. As you can see, I have few obstacles, the water heater is standing in the premier spot so it needs to be relocated, the return trunk needs to be moved to the other side of the wall, the small window on the corner needs to be enlarged as egress, and I am planing to put a bathroom in the basement, so plumbing rough in with toilet and shower and sewer well need to be done.
This is the planed alternation of the water heater, return trunk and egress:


Here is the incomplete design of the basement, I used got a better and complete one but I lost it when my Windows XP crashed on me and destroyed the hard disk (I moved to Win7 with new hard disk and separate external hard disk as backup).


As you can see, I have to leave 3' path in the back of the screen wall for egress access per code required, so I lose 3' to the overall length of the theater room.

Here is another shot of the design in X-Ray mode:


Another one:


Side view in X-Ray:


Theater back view in X-Ray:


Screen and Stage:


Theater entrance:


Theater back:


Theater wall should be upper and lower section in black and middle section in red.

The work started after the Christmas, mainly did some prep works, first thing first, clean up the basement, get organized and thrown out a lot of junks, I built 2 8'x8'x2' shelves with wheels in garage, the two shelves can store a lot of stuff that wife and I boxed. Today is my third time to dump out the junks, still need to dump one or two more times to get rid of everything.

So far, I got egress done, water heater relocated, plumbing rough in done and return trunk moved, here are some shots:

The supposed entrance to the theater room, door is between the post and stair wall.


Non-exist front wall, you can see the new egress and my blue tape mock-up of the stage:


Looking into mechanical room from the theater, you can see water heater new location:


Under the stair will be the equipment closet, on the right, is the future theater door:


Future bar area:


Mechanical room and you can also see the blue tape mock-up of the bathroom with rough-in done:


Bathroom rough-in and sewer well/pump rough-in and venting:


HVAC supply trunk next to the beam, the return trunk used to be next to the supply, but was moved:


Moved return trunk on the other side of the wall:


Getting rim joist insulated:


existing dirty fiber glass insulation:


Other small window is blocked and sealed with foam board:


Insulation of rim joist is a dirty and messy job, a lot of hard reach dead corners and spot, with pipes and wires, Great Stuff is messy and sticky, wasted a lot but it works better than caulk in this scenario since there is little room to work, with caulking gun, there is no clearance to apply the caulk.

Crack on the floor are filled with Quikrete concrete crack sealer:



Found couple of cracks on the foundation wall that need to be repaired:


Another one one the same wall as the egress window, I suspect it was caused by the sludge hammer when doing the egress cutting and knocking:


I ordered foundation wall repair kit from Concrete Charlie, suppose to be very good, will arrive in couple of days. But with the freezing temperature outside, it is probably better to wait until the weather gets up 40s.

That's all so far, next will repair the cracks, then order lumber to start framing.
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post #2 of 590 Old 01-12-2010, 12:38 AM
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Nice, I'll be watching for your progress. Let me guess, a goal ? Avatar on the screen, so it has to be complete by the time it hits blu-ray ?

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post #3 of 590 Old 01-12-2010, 09:13 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidinCT View Post

Nice, I'll be watching for your progress. Let me guess, a goal ? Avatar on the screen, so it has to be complete by the time it hits blu-ray ?

Well, my permit is only good for a year, so I have to complete it within a year. I may hire someone to do the drywall, that would speed up the build.
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post #4 of 590 Old 01-12-2010, 07:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Here are couple of shots of the shelves that I made to store things that used to be sitting in the basement, now they are organized and stored in garage:



The shelves are on wheels and the bottom of the shelves is open so I can slide some big items like lawn mower under. You may not be able see in the pictures but there are two of them, if I need something stored in the back shelve, I can just pull the front shelve and get access to the back one and push the front shelve back, it is really convenient and can really store a lot of stuff.
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post #5 of 590 Old 01-12-2010, 07:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Received it today. It comes with 4 different viscosity resins from thin to thick to repair cracks of different size. I ordered some extra resin to repair two cracks on wall, hopefully it does as good as professional repairs.


Has anyone done this before? How difficult to do and any thing that I need to pay special attention to?
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post #6 of 590 Old 01-13-2010, 01:08 AM
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Never seen it but, Would be interested in the process and how well it worked (I got a small crack in my basement when there is really, really heavy rain, it will leak a little (but, it has to be a major and long rain storm for it to happen)

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post #7 of 590 Old 01-13-2010, 07:39 PM - Thread Starter
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If you are going to finish your basement, it is wise to get it repaired before you put the wall up, you don't want end up tear down the wall later.
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post #8 of 590 Old 01-15-2010, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

The shelves are on wheels and the bottom of the shelves is open so I can slide some big items like lawn mower under. You may not be able see in the pictures but there are two of them, if I need something stored in the back shelve, I can just pull the front shelve and get access to the back one and push the front shelve back, it is really convenient and can really store a lot of stuff.

Nice! What are you using for wheels, with all that potential weight to support? Any more photos of these you can share?

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post #9 of 590 Old 01-15-2010, 08:44 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Nice! What are you using for wheels, with all that potential weight to support? Any more photos of these you can share?

Thanks Hanesian, the wheel are from HD, go to the hardware section and you can find several different size casters. I think mine can hold 350lb so it is really strong. I am at work so I don't have pictures with me, I will post some more pictures of the shelves.
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post #10 of 590 Old 01-15-2010, 11:47 AM - Thread Starter
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I went to a savage yard to look at a used server rack, it was huge, with the caster, it stands 85", 24" wide and 38" deep, only for $60, but it is too big for my needs, so I didn't get it. Keep looking on craigslist.
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post #11 of 590 Old 01-15-2010, 12:20 PM
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Spent a little time in Sandman's thread, huh? Good luck!
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post #12 of 590 Old 01-15-2010, 01:57 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

Spent a little time in Sandman's thread, huh? Good luck!

Thanks, if my build turn out even only one third as nice as Sandman's, I will be a very happy camper
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post #13 of 590 Old 01-15-2010, 06:38 PM - Thread Starter
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I am kicking myself now, I think I made a huge stupid mistake, last night I went down to the basement and looked around and took some measurements and then I suddenly came to realize that I should have the egress cut on the left section of the wall next to the electric panel, so I don't have to give away 3 feet pass way to egress which would have made my theater room 23' long! What was I F**king thinking?
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post #14 of 590 Old 01-16-2010, 08:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Today I got foundation wall cracks repaired with the Epoxy crack repair kit, the process went relatively smooth, just follow the instructions and it is definitely DIY-able.

First, prepare surface by wire brushing the cracks, clear any loose dirty and use you hand to pad the cracks to drive out the dusts, then mixed two parts epoxy compounds to make the surface seal, then surface seal the crack, with injection port mounted as well, after about 30 minutes, the surface seal is set, then I started injection.

Surface seal applied and injection ports mounted:


Epoxy resin injected and ports sealed:


Closeup shot after the repair, it takes few hours to allow epoxy resin to set:


It was little messy but in the end, I managed to get it done.
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post #15 of 590 Old 01-17-2010, 12:02 PM - Thread Starter
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In case someone happens to have the similar situation and needs have your repaired, and if you cannot find the repair kit locally, you can PM me and I will send you the link where I purchased from. If it is not against the forum rules, I will post the link to public so every one can see.
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post #16 of 590 Old 01-17-2010, 01:13 PM
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I had fixed several cracks before my build also but I went one step futher after the repair.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...0#post10937120

http://www.amesresearch.com/basement...JAodmzLk2w#bwr

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post #17 of 590 Old 01-17-2010, 01:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W00lly View Post

I had fixed several cracks before my build also but I went one step futher after the repair.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...0#post10937120

http://www.amesresearch.com/basement...JAodmzLk2w#bwr

My wall has waterproof coating already so I don't need to that extra step which save me some money
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post #18 of 590 Old 01-18-2010, 07:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Scott,
What kind of crack injection material do you use, was urethane foam or epoxy resin? I read that urethane foam expands several times of the size after encounter the moisture, so do you know which one is bonding better and stronger?

Another question, I saw you installed Delta sub-floor, how much height did you loose, I evil you have 9' ceiling, mine is just regular 7'8" so every inch of height is precious. Nice looking theater by the way.
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post #19 of 590 Old 01-18-2010, 07:45 PM
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I used both the foam and the epoxy. I had one crack that you could get a credit card in and they said to use the foam for cracks that big and epoxy for the smaller ones.
You would lose about a 1" 1/8 using the delta and sub floor.

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post #20 of 590 Old 01-18-2010, 08:24 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W00lly View Post

I used both the foam and the epoxy. I had one crack that you could get a credit card in and they said to use the foam for cracks that big and epoxy for the smaller ones.
You would lose about a 1" 1/8 using the delta and sub floor.

Thanks Scott, I got one crack of that size too. I got the kit from Concrete Charlie, he gave me 4 types of epoxy resin, each with different viscosity, the injection process is little different, he advised me to start from the top with the thinnest resin to "lubricate" the cracks, then, depends on the size of the cracks, use thicker resin, this time start from bottom, then use the thickest resin (like gel) to top off the injection ports. For hairline cracks, use the thinnest resin which is supposed can go water can go.

So, with delta, head channel and DD, we are talking about ~3" lose of height, with back riser and under the soffit, it is going to be very tight!
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post #21 of 590 Old 01-18-2010, 08:57 PM - Thread Starter
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I bought studs this afternoon, 200 of them, that's about as much as my truck can carry in one trip, also bought some PT boards for the bottom sills, but I forgot to buy 2x6x8 boards for top plate of staggered wall. I know I need more than 200 but for now it is enough to get framing started, I will get more if needed.

Just wondering, where do you guys got your studs from? HD or Lowes or local lumber yard? I called several local places, they are much more expensive than HD and Lowes. Less than $2 at HD and Lowes for 2x4x8, but local lumber yards charge $3.25 to $3.50. HD lumbers are not very good, too many warped, Lowes are much better so I got mine from Lowes.


I also bought 6 rolls (16"x25') Reflectix R3.7 wrap for duct insulation. I went to a local HVAC supply place, they don't sell to the home owners and one contractor happened to be there buying something, and he was like "if they sell to you homeowners, then we are out of business", well, take your complain to HD and Lowes, see if they care.
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post #22 of 590 Old 01-20-2010, 09:44 PM - Thread Starter
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This side of stair case wall is load baring wall, I plan to take out the first 3 studs from the right to open it up, the 4th studs is 9' from foundation wall and 7' from the I-Beam on the left, top plate attaches to double joists (16' cross). Do you think it is fine? Also, do you usually cut out portion of the top plate?
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post #23 of 590 Old 01-21-2010, 05:12 AM
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The stair wall you show in the photo doesn't look like a bearing wall. Can you clarify what you're asking?

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post #24 of 590 Old 01-21-2010, 09:46 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

The stair wall you show in the photo doesn't look like a bearing wall. Can you clarify what you're asking?

I think it is load bearing, there is a half wall right above it (stairs to the second floor) in the first floor and a full wall on the second floor. I will post a picture of the upstair walls right above it.
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post #25 of 590 Old 01-25-2010, 07:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Help needed, in order to meet fireblocking code for soffit, I have to do something like this in the picture, 1/2" sheetrock attached to the joist as fire barrier. As you can see, there is not much clearance behind the duct work (about 8" from duct to foundation wall, minus 4.5" of framed wall and air gap, only leave me 3.5"), so how do I anchor the DC04 clips in this situation?
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post #26 of 590 Old 01-25-2010, 09:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

I think it is load bearing, there is a half wall right above it (stairs to the second floor) in the first floor and a full wall on the second floor. I will post a picture of the upstair walls right above it.

Can't help you with your recent RSIC clip question, but back on the issue of whether that wall is load bearing or not ... in the photo of the stair wall I only see basic 2 x 4 framing. Is there post/beam or other substantial support not shown in the photo? I can't imagine how it could possibly be load bearing otherwise.

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post #27 of 590 Old 01-25-2010, 11:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Can't help you with your recent RSIC clip question, but back on the issue of whether that wall is load bearing or not ... in the photo of the stair wall I only see basic 2 x 4 framing. Is there post/beam or other substantial support not shown in the photo? I can't imagine how it could possibly be load bearing otherwise.

Well, it is under double 2x9" joists, here is the shot from another angle

Here is the half wall above it which is aligned with, you can see the full wall on second floor
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post #28 of 590 Old 01-26-2010, 06:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

This side of stair case wall is load baring wall, I plan to take out the first 3 studs from the right to open it up, the 4th studs is 9' from foundation wall and 7' from the I-Beam on the left, top plate attaches to double joists (16' cross). Do you think it is fine? Also, do you usually cut out portion of the top plate?

Quote:
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Well, it is under double 2x9" joists, here is the shot from another angle

OK, now I see what you're referring to.

I hope others with more experience jump in here for you on this question, but I'm thinking that even though those joists support load bearing walls above, that doesn't mean that the simple 2 x 4 framing constructed under them are load bearing. I wouldn't mess with any I beams or such supporting the 2x9" joists, but that 2 x 4 framing itself around the stairs should be fair game for coming out.

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post #29 of 590 Old 01-26-2010, 10:38 AM
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You can see where the doubled 2x9's sit on the steel beam in the far end of that picture (that's just one end). The question I would have is how far is the OTHER support beam is away from the 2x4 wall where it ends, or what is total span of the 2x9's?

I would consider an interior wall which has framing or roof trusses running over it (especially running perpendicular) as suspect "load bearing". This is similar to that scenario in my mind, especially given that it appears that there's at least one floor and maybe two above bearing down on those 2x9's. You also have a double 2x9 header running perpendicular at the top of the stairway exit. The load that's supporting load is shared with the other 2x9's, and is transmitting some portion of that aggregate through that "little 2x4 wall".

If it were me, I'd get someone in there who can give you a better idea on what you can and can't do before you start cutting out that wall
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post #30 of 590 Old 01-26-2010, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

Help needed, in order to meet fireblocking code for soffit, I have to do something like this in the picture, 1/2" sheetrock attached to the joist as fire barrier. As you can see, there is not much clearance behind the duct work (about 8" from duct to foundation wall, minus 4.5" of framed wall and air gap, only leave me 3.5"), so how do I anchor the DC04 clips in this situation?

I think you might be wrong about the fireblock. I had this same question and actually got the building inspector to come out to specifically answer this question. The answer I got was that the drywall in your pic is not necessary. The plywood (or OSB) of the floor above the basement IS the fireblock, so you don't need the drywall. As always, please consult your local code dept as codes vary.
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