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post #271 of 649 Old 08-22-2012, 11:16 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

I'm planning to use the same fan to exhaust my room, and, thanks to TMcG, I found that two 6" ducts has only slightly more cross sectional area than an 8" duct. So you are not going to be slowing the air as much as you might expect.

Are you using the fan to pull any air from the room, or just from the equipment rack and the hush box? That's a lot of air just for an equipment rack and a hush box. I can't remember the details of your room right off hand, but you might consider adding an exhaust from your room as well. It will help pull a little more air from your existing HVAC line, and adding another 6" line to that fan will help slow down the air in each to reduce wind noise.

Hi JPA,

I had thought of doing exactly that! I was going to start with just the two runs and make sure both ventilated adequately and if excessive, i was going to add another return to the room.

Question: Are you just adding a return and no supplies? Do you have other connecting cross vents to other rooms?
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post #272 of 649 Old 08-22-2012, 11:33 AM
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I have one supply that is "supposed" to be adequate for cooling, but not enough cfm for 4-6 air exchanges. The room has no returns now. My plan is to add another crossover to an adjacent room, and then add the powered exhaust to get the air exchanges I need, and hopefully squeeze a little more flow out of that single HVAC supply.

If you run the numbers on a 6" duct moving 200 cfm (assuming each 6" gets half the flow), then you are looking at 1,000+ ft/min. That sounds pretty high, and I don't know if it will actually flow that much, but it's going to be way above the 250 ft/min that Dennis recommends.

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post #273 of 649 Old 08-22-2012, 12:14 PM - Thread Starter
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A couple pics to show I'm doin' work ;)

 

Is it just me or do all projects start like this?:

 

Projector hush box.  Side view of access door for cleaning filter:

 

 

This is the front and side.

 

 

Detail of front door.  Rabbit is for foam weather stripping on door jambs so the box is sealed up tight.

 

 

A couple things on the hushbox/soffit:

  • The front of hush box will have a door hinged to fold down for access to the projector.
  • The door will have a glass port for the projector to shine through.  The glass is will be mounted into an angled extension to the door.  I think a 15degree angle is recommended and this glass.
  • The rear soffit is going to be filled with some absorption material.  Not sure which flavor yet.
  • 6" duct to and from the box dumping to another room and conduit for wires and power to the box.

 

 

I should be able to finish putting the skeleton of the rear soffit together tonight, its not much to look at though just some 2x2s painted black and assembled into a lightweight skeleton......

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post #274 of 649 Old 08-22-2012, 12:34 PM
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Hi TB,


I considered this option, but however in the winter the room still gets too hot and i dont want the AC kicking on when its 20F outside and killing the compressor........


In the summer this would be the solution of choice though......


If i get enough supply lines i could just wire a second thermostat to call for the air handler which would exchange the air........ That is still an option.

I know this was posted a while ago and you may have found your solution, but you could always put a head pressure control on your condensing unit to allow for low ambient operation.

BTW, I have been reading this thread for the last couple days while it has been slow at work (go figure that it is slow in August working for the Trane Corp.) and your build is pretty amazing. I do not really understand most of the technical stuff yet (all the graphs and what not), but once I get my space setup the way I want I plan on trying to learn all that stuff. Congrats on the build man.

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post #275 of 649 Old 08-22-2012, 02:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Hi TB,


I considered this option, but however in the winter the room still gets too hot and i dont want the AC kicking on when its 20F outside and killing the compressor........


In the summer this would be the solution of choice though......


If i get enough supply lines i could just wire a second thermostat to call for the air handler which would exchange the air........ That is still an option.

I know this was posted a while ago and you may have found your solution, but you could always put a head pressure control on your condensing unit to allow for low ambient operation.

BTW, I have been reading this thread for the last couple days while it has been slow at work (go figure that it is slow in August working for the Trane Corp.) and your build is pretty amazing. I do not really understand most of the technical stuff yet (all the graphs and what not), but once I get my space setup the way I want I plan on trying to learn all that stuff. Congrats on the build man.

Hi Smigro,

Ill have to look into the head pressure sensor, sounds like it could work. Thank you for the kind words and advice!

Cool about you getting yours going be shure to link me up in case i can prod you along!
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post #276 of 649 Old 08-22-2012, 03:40 PM
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Hi Smigro,
Ill have to look into the head pressure sensor, sounds like it could work. Thank you for the kind words and advice!
Cool about you getting yours going be shure to link me up in case i can prod you along!

Not a problem man. Their out there trust me...how else would all the server rooms be able to operate in the NE if they could have cooling in the winter. biggrin.gif

This isn't necessarily one for your system, but at least you can read up on it.

http://www.icmcontrols.com/HEAD-PRESSURE-CONTROLS-Prodlist.html

Good luck on the rest of your build and I will be following closely to see the final outcome.

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post #277 of 649 Old 08-22-2012, 05:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Cool now I have something to look up while I'm slow at work ;)

 

More pics of work being done....

 

Now before we begin, unwinding, this stuff rocks!!!

 

The soffit skeleton is done so lets set the hush box up in it and get a picture of how it will look on the back wall.

 

Wait, Disclaimer:  I disassembled and re-assembled the side receiving the hush box twice.  I built a left handed soffit skeleton and I really needed a right handed soffit skeleton.  Anyone following this?  I'm confusing myselt!  Sooo this took waaaaaay longer than it should.

 

Anyhow, skeleton plus hush box:

 

 

Yup thats rain in background but I don't let that slow me down when theres beer to drink, i mean work to do......

 

 

 

 

 

I don't think I mentioned a worthwile detail.  I'm also containing my rear surrounds in this soffit(above projector hush box).  This cleans up the back and simplifies the overall setup.

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post #278 of 649 Old 08-23-2012, 05:52 AM
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I am truly amazed at some of the stuff you guys can do. Most of this I would not even know where to start...which brings to a question. How did you go about planning building your subs? After reading through some of the DIY stuff on here I think I want to attempt to make my own sub, only problem is I am having trouble finding a place to get all the dimensional data and what not needed to construct the box along with the components I should be using. I see the master list in the DIY section, but most of them seem to really just be the builds with not type of blueprints on how to cut everything. If you could lead me in the right direction I would really appreciate it.

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post #279 of 649 Old 08-31-2012, 08:18 AM
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Mr. Hitachi,

After thinking over you situation with your vent fan, if you are only venting your hush box and rack, I think 400 cfm is a bit much. If you figure your rack is 4'x2'x3' (I'm just pulling numbers out of the air here), then you're looking at 24 ft^3. Plus, you have equipment taking up some of that volume. At any rate, if your fan only moves 24 cfm, then you'll be exchanging ALL of the air in your equipment rack every minute. Your hush box will be even smaller. Obviously you have to develop enough head pressure to overcome the frictional losses in your ducts, but I think 400+ cfm is probably overkill for just those two locations.

Take all this with a grain of salt. I'm an electrical engineer, not a mechanical engineer. So thermo is not really my bag of tricks smile.gif

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post #280 of 649 Old 08-31-2012, 04:57 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks JPA,

Ill continue to watch and see how yours works out.....

Meanwhile the back soffit is still in progress, and a bit more work on the hush box:

Heres what we drinkin, gotta get all this we can summer about over, but then there's OctoberFEST!





Heres some shots of hush box coming along:

5553B8F4-8083-4E95-99CC-251BD1558030-2899-0000034A58D38015.jpg

 

A65EBF98-3A99-49A2-B1AA-D0ECB9AED00C-2899-0000034A51671F95.jpg

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post #281 of 649 Old 09-02-2012, 11:01 AM
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Hush Box is looking real good! (despite the brew distractions) smile.gif

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post #282 of 649 Old 09-03-2012, 02:14 PM - Thread Starter
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Hey Cuzed,

Thanks, it doesnt look like much yet, but it will be a nice addition when complete!

Yeah, im a huge craft beer fan. I just make sure all the power tool
work is done before i enjoy a couple. Although, i have run the Orbital sander
under the influence smile.gif

No work done on labor day, went island camping last night. After breaking down camp and cleaning boat im wiped.
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post #283 of 649 Old 09-04-2012, 03:43 PM
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Hush Box Question

Hey Nick,

Your HT build is looking awesome.

Sorry if I missed this in your thread, but why do you think you need the hush box? I'm not trying to be a smart ass (this time biggrin.gif), but is it needed?

The reason I'm asking is I originally planned to put one in my HT when I had an old Panny projector. After I got my Epson 8500UB, I'm questioning if I need it. The fan is rated at 22 dB – 28 dB and is right behind the back row. It's pretty quiet now and when I move it up to the ceiling on a "shelf" per below, I'm questioning if a full hush box is needed.

When I designed my room many years ago, I assumed I would need a full hush box like you are putting together. In fact, you may be able to see in the photo that I configured the area with in/out ventilation ducts with plans to hook up to a blower.

Now as I'm getting ready to tackle this phase, I'm questioning if just putting it on a shelf with open ventilation (and seal up the hush box in/out ducts) would work. Thoughts? Is there a rationale beyond quieting the sound?

Thanks!

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post #284 of 649 Old 09-04-2012, 05:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi Java,

 

Man you really crank out some projects!  First those sweet SEOS speaks and now a hush box!?  I have had to put this project in front of the final assembly of my SEOSs :(

 

My hush box is really dual function.  I have heat issues which is the real driving factor on the hush box.  I'm venting with a closed system outside the room.  The Panny AE4000 has very similar noise ratings and I can hear it on very quiet passages.  However my projector is right above my head currently.  I also want to vent the equipment rack concurrently on the same closed system.  Its really a lager noise offender with the pro amp and PS3 and 120mm case fans kinda sounds like a jet back there.....  Yours seems like its behind you far enough the noise probably wouldn't be a problem.

 

However, as far as noise and noise floor goes, ambient noise is cumulative and while you might not hear one thing alone, the sum of all the noise from all the equipment can raise the floor and contaminate your sound field.  Thats where I'm at currently.

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post #285 of 649 Old 09-04-2012, 06:49 PM
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Hey that hush box is looking pretty sharp. Nicely done. I'm with you on the noise floor. The same could be said about the noise floor around the RTROSE household. When it is just me and Mrs. RTROSE it is very quiet, with the two boys not so much, but you really don't notice it until they leave/go to sleep. biggrin.gif

Regards,

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post #286 of 649 Old 09-04-2012, 08:16 PM
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Hi Java,

Man you really crank out some projects!  First those sweet SEOS speaks and now a hush box!?  I have had to put this project in front of the final assembly of my SEOSs frown.gif

My hush box is really dual function.  I have heat issues which is the real driving factor on the hush box.  I'm venting with a closed system outside the room.  The Panny AE4000 has very similar noise ratings and I can hear it on very quiet passages.  However my projector is right above my head currently.  I also want to vent the equipment rack concurrently on the same closed system.  Its really a lager noise offender with the pro amp and PS3 and 120mm case fans kinda sounds like a jet back there.....  Yours seems like its behind you far enough the noise probably wouldn't be a problem.

However, as far as noise and noise floor goes, ambient noise is cumulative and while you might not hear one thing alone, the sum of all the noise from all the equipment can raise the floor and contaminate your sound field.  Thats where I'm at currently.

It's your damn fault!!! biggrin.gif

"Also start thinking about reflections from the back of the room. The higher energy(Controlled Directivity and High Efficiency) of those back reflections will come into play. They will be high gain and early arrival enough to the primary sound to muddle things. IOW treatments will help considerably. I don't see any are they just hidden well?"

Just kidding. You got me thinking about my much delayed acoustic treatment project, which means I have to move my "temporary" EQ Rack in the back so I can put up back wall absorbers. And that then brings me back to my hush box...

Actually, I think the 4000 has better noise ratings then my Epson. My memory may be scrambled, but I believe when I was looking at the 8500UB vs the AE3000, the 3000 had better noise levels.

Anyway, I hear you on the noise floor. My room is pretty quiet with all the isolation/sound deadening I did in construction. My EQ isn't too loud now. The PS3 is prob the loudest, but it's a slim... Anyway, all of that will go into a rack into a cubby hole. Love your rack, BTW. Quite excellent on the face plates!!

I'll keep watching your Hush box build. Sorry if you mentioned this earlier, but did you source glass for the box? Also, how are you venting? Thermo controlled fan?

Last, maybe we are looking at this all wrong. I finished my SEOS project ahead of you and have been cranking it up. Now, I don't hear any noise from the back. Get it? rolleyes.gif
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post #287 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 04:59 AM - Thread Starter
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Hey that hush box is looking pretty sharp. Nicely done. I'm with you on the noise floor. The same could be said about the noise floor around the RTROSE household. When it is just me and Mrs. RTROSE it is very quiet, with the two boys not so much, but you really don't notice it until they leave/go to sleep. biggrin.gif

Regards,

RTROSE

Thanks RT,

I know what your sayin about ruckus around the house, i remember how much me and my brother cut up as kids.... My hats off to folks with multiple children, my boy is only 10 but hes plenty loud on his own!

Nicholas
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post #288 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 05:08 AM
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That hush box is going to be sweet! I like the progress so far and can't wait to see the final installation. I like that you're going to integrate the rear channels into the soffit. That will clean up a lot of floorspace.


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post #289 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 06:00 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicksHitachi View Post

Hi Java,

Man you really crank out some projects!  First those sweet SEOS speaks and now a hush box!?  I have had to put this project in front of the final assembly of my SEOSs frown.gif

My hush box is really dual function.  I have heat issues which is the real driving factor on the hush box.  I'm venting with a closed system outside the room.  The Panny AE4000 has very similar noise ratings and I can hear it on very quiet passages.  However my projector is right above my head currently.  I also want to vent the equipment rack concurrently on the same closed system.  Its really a lager noise offender with the pro amp and PS3 and 120mm case fans kinda sounds like a jet back there.....  Yours seems like its behind you far enough the noise probably wouldn't be a problem.

However, as far as noise and noise floor goes, ambient noise is cumulative and while you might not hear one thing alone, the sum of all the noise from all the equipment can raise the floor and contaminate your sound field.  Thats where I'm at currently.

It's your damn fault!!! biggrin.gif

"Also start thinking about reflections from the back of the room. The higher energy(Controlled Directivity and High Efficiency) of those back reflections will come into play. They will be high gain and early arrival enough to the primary sound to muddle things. IOW treatments will help considerably. I don't see any are they just hidden well?"

Just kidding. You got me thinking about my much delayed acoustic treatment project, which means I have to move my "temporary" EQ Rack in the back so I can put up back wall absorbers. And that then brings me back to my hush box...

Actually, I think the 4000 has better noise ratings then my Epson. My memory may be scrambled, but I believe when I was looking at the 8500UB vs the AE3000, the 3000 had better noise levels.

Anyway, I hear you on the noise floor. My room is pretty quiet with all the isolation/sound deadening I did in construction. My EQ isn't too loud now. The PS3 is prob the loudest, but it's a slim... Anyway, all of that will go into a rack into a cubby hole. Love your rack, BTW. Quite excellent on the face plates!!

I'll keep watching your Hush box build. Sorry if you mentioned this earlier, but did you source glass for the box? Also, how are you venting? Thermo controlled fan?

Last, maybe we are looking at this all wrong. I finished my SEOS project ahead of you and have been cranking it up. Now, I don't hear any noise from the back. Get it? rolleyes.gif

Haha! Oh its MY fault!

Your absolutely right, you just gotta be HIGH enough above the noise floor wink.gif

Yes, the glass is coming from edmunds optics, linked above but im on my phone.

Im going to run the fan with two speeds. Low speed continuous and actuated to full or partial full speed with 12V relay via trigger.

I robbed the suggestion to use a ceiling fan speed controller for low speed off JPA's build thread.

Nicholas
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post #290 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 06:10 AM - Thread Starter
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That hush box is going to be sweet! I like the progress so far and can't wait to see the final installation. I like that you're going to integrate the rear channels into the soffit. That will clean up a lot of floorspace.


Hey JD, whats up!?

Yup, im looking forward to cleaning it up, cooling and quieting it down.

Thanks for the complements, ive got a lot i want to do, need to chisel away at it.....

Nicholas
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post #291 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 07:14 AM
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Hey Nick. I haven't forgot about our conversation regarding the heat removal for your hush box and AV rack, I just haven't had the time to dig into the calculations with my other obligations and it may be another 4-7 days before I can get to it. In the meantime here is a thermal white paper from Middle Atlantic that I think should be required reading for anyone who considers building an equipment rack, hush box or other electronics enclosure. The information to do your own calculations is here if you want to give it a shot, fyi.

http://middleatlantic.com/pdf/ThermalManagement.pdf
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post #292 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 11:50 AM - Thread Starter
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Hey Nick. I haven't forgot about our conversation regarding the heat removal for your hush box and AV rack, I just haven't had the time to dig into the calculations with my other obligations and it may be another 4-7 days before I can get to it. In the meantime here is a thermal white paper from Middle Atlantic that I think should be required reading for anyone who considers building an equipment rack, hush box or other electronics enclosure. The information to do your own calculations is here if you want to give it a shot, fyi.

http://middleatlantic.com/pdf/ThermalManagement.pdf

Hi TMcG,

No i didnt think that, ive got lots of little things to piddle on with the hush box, back soffit, and AV Rack before i need to decide and purchase the ventilator.

I have read that whitepaper at least 20x..... I used the in the bottom out the top concept to work with the natural chimney effect for the original rack design as well as shelves with grates so air can percolate up through the components.

Im curious to see how many cfm you come up with......

Nicholas
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post #293 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 03:09 PM
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Haha! Oh its MY fault!
Your absolutely right, you just gotta be HIGH enough above the noise floor wink.gif
Yes, the glass is coming from edmunds optics, linked above but im on my phone.
Im going to run the fan with two speeds. Low speed continuous and actuated to full or partial full speed with 12V relay via trigger.
I robbed the suggestion to use a ceiling fan speed controller for low speed off JPA's build thread.
Nicholas

I'm still plowing through JPA's thread, but if it helps, here was a ventilation thread I started many moons ago: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1048290/hush-box-equipment-room-ventilation

I originally thought I was going to go the 12v trigger route, but BigMouthinDC points out that there is a cool down period beyond after "shut down". A better approach would be to use a thermostat. That way the blower stays on after the system powers down and then kicks off after it reaches the right temp.
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post #294 of 649 Old 09-05-2012, 05:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Haha! Oh its MY fault!
Your absolutely right, you just gotta be HIGH enough above the noise floor wink.gif
Yes, the glass is coming from edmunds optics, linked above but im on my phone.
Im going to run the fan with two speeds. Low speed continuous and actuated to full or partial full speed with 12V relay via trigger.
I robbed the suggestion to use a ceiling fan speed controller for low speed off JPA's build thread.
Nicholas

I'm still plowing through JPA's thread, but if it helps, here was a ventilation thread I started many moons ago: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1048290/hush-box-equipment-room-ventilation

I originally thought I was going to go the 12v trigger route, but BigMouthinDC points out that there is a cool down period beyond after "shut down". A better approach would be to use a thermostat. That way the blower stays on after the system powers down and then kicks off after it reaches the right temp.

Thanks Java!

That was helpful. It looks like my design is equivalent to the nuclear option at the bottom of this article:

http://www.activethermal.com/Cooling%20the%20enclosed%20video%20projector.pdf

I found that whitepaper from a link D.Erskine linked in your thread.

Cool air from a remote location, but i hadnt planned to duct the hot air directly out the exhaust with the duct attached to the projector like that though.... I might have to think about that.
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post #295 of 649 Old 09-06-2012, 03:31 AM - Thread Starter
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I originally thought I was going to go the 12v trigger route, but BigMouthinDC points out that there is a cool down period beyond after "shut down".

Oh, forgot this.

I do like the idea of controlling via thermostat. Two thermostats(hush box and rack) are my ideal setup.

My original plan was to leave the fan ON low speed continuous and switch to higher speed when the projector was running. I have a DVR and other components which need continuous cooling.

Question for my electrician friends: If i feed two feeds of 120v to the panasonic fan, that should be ok right? Each feed would be controlled via relay(either thermostat or 12v) but both could potentially be open a same time. Two hot commons wired to common of fan simultaneously hot. Obviously i have to watch for back feed on the closed circuits but the relays should handle that.... Im only going to relay the common. This is ok right?
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post #296 of 649 Old 09-06-2012, 04:55 AM
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Two thermostats(hush box and rack) are my ideal setup.
My original plan was to leave the fan ON low speed continuous and switch to higher speed when the projector was running. I have a DVR and other components which need continuous cooling.
Question for my electrician friends: If i feed two feeds of 120v to the panasonic fan, that should be ok right? Each feed would be controlled via relay(either thermostat or 12v) but both could potentially be open a same time. Two hot commons wired to common of fan simultaneously hot. Obviously i have to watch for back feed on the closed circuits but the relays should handle that.... Im only going to relay the common. This is ok right?

Don't do what you proposed above.

Ideal is to break this up into two separate fans or cooling zones, each with a thermostatically controlled variable speed fan. The fans can be on the same circuit, but should be "hot" all the time with the fan controller dictating when, speed and for how long the fans stay on so everything is completely automatic. Dual thermostats and electrical feeds with triggers, etc. significantly complicates the engineering and potential reliability of the setup IMHO.

You CAN trigger the fan on/off as Big suggests.....but the trick is to time the cool-down sequence of your projector, and then set your control system to turn off the AVR, preamp or other triggering device about a minute after that. I had a Sony Qualia 004 projector and I simply programmed my Crestron system to turn the preamp off about 4 minutes after the Qualia powered off to run the hush box fan during the cool-down sequence. It was very easy, reliable to operate and completely automatic. I also had a completely separate fan system for the equipment racks as well that was thermostatically controlled with a variable speed fan - it was a System 1 from Active Thermal Management.
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post #297 of 649 Old 09-06-2012, 06:14 AM
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Oh, forgot this.
I do like the idea of controlling via thermostat. Two thermostats(hush box and rack) are my ideal setup.
My original plan was to leave the fan ON low speed continuous and switch to higher speed when the projector was running. I have a DVR and other components which need continuous cooling.
Question for my electrician friends: If i feed two feeds of 120v to the panasonic fan, that should be ok right? Each feed would be controlled via relay(either thermostat or 12v) but both could potentially be open a same time. Two hot commons wired to common of fan simultaneously hot. Obviously i have to watch for back feed on the closed circuits but the relays should handle that.... Im only going to relay the common. This is ok right?

I didn't think about the "always on" DVR. Mine runs pretty hot.

What if you drop the threshold of the thermostat down to like 80'? Assuming your room temp is below that, it will only kick in when the components kick in. For the DVR, as long as it has cooler air than itself to circulate it's happy. Once the box gets too hot (above 80'), then the fan kicks in.

I realize it's an all or nothing approach where the fan will kick in full, but it may only be for a short duration. Once the fan vents the hot air, the temp drops and the switch kicks off. The other option is to look for a variable speed thermo.
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post #298 of 649 Old 09-06-2012, 06:49 AM
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I didn't think about the "always on" DVR. Mine runs pretty hot.
What if you drop the threshold of the thermostat down to like 80'? Assuming your room temp is below that, it will only kick in when the components kick in. For the DVR, as long as it has cooler air than itself to circulate it's happy. Once the box gets too hot (above 80'), then the fan kicks in.
I realize it's an all or nothing approach where the fan will kick in full, but it may only be for a short duration. Once the fan vents the hot air, the temp drops and the switch kicks off. The other option is to look for a variable speed thermo.

Two things:
1. Most cable companies now have newer Motorola DVR boxes available that run significantly cooler than those in the past. I had three in my last rack and they single-handedly were responsible for the bulk of my thermal load in my rack / equipment room. I replaced them with three brand new DVR boxes from the cable company and I can barely feel any warmth on the top of the box, so they have radically reduced the power requirements and subsequent heat associated with these boxes if you can get the newer models. One other point - these new boxes draw from the bottom and exhaust out the back of the component with their own internal thermostatically controlled fan so they are ultra-quiet as well. Here is the Motorola box I had: http://www.motorola.com/Video-Solutions/US-EN/Products-and-Services/Video-Consumer-Premise-Equipment/All-Digital-Set-Tops/DCX3400_US-EN

2. The ideal operating temperature for most equipment is 85 degrees. Virtually all professionally controlled systems kick on at 85 and shut off at 90 degrees. Some allow temps up to 95, but most stop at 90 or 92 as the "maximum" temperature setting.
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Two things:
1. Most cable companies now have newer Motorola DVR boxes available that run significantly cooler than those in the past. I had three in my last rack and they single-handedly were responsible for the bulk of my thermal load in my rack / equipment room. I replaced them with three brand new DVR boxes from the cable company and I can barely feel any warmth on the top of the box, so they have radically reduced the power requirements and subsequent heat associated with these boxes if you can get the newer models. One other point - these new boxes draw from the bottom and exhaust out the back of the component with their own internal thermostatically controlled fan so they are ultra-quiet as well. Here is the Motorola box I had: http://www.motorola.com/Video-Solutions/US-EN/Products-and-Services/Video-Consumer-Premise-Equipment/All-Digital-Set-Tops/DCX3400_US-EN
2. The ideal operating temperature for most equipment is 85 degrees. Virtually all professionally controlled systems kick on at 85 and shut off at 90 degrees. Some allow temps up to 95, but most stop at 90 or 92 as the "maximum" temperature setting.

So if Nick (and me, since I'm in the same boat) uses a thermo switch set at 85, there is no need to have a dual switch with the low setting running all the time, right? If the box/closet gets too hot (i.e., over 85), the fan's kick in. Am I oversimplifying?
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post #300 of 649 Old 09-06-2012, 07:22 AM
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So if Nick (and me, since I'm in the same boat) uses a thermo switch set at 85, there is no need to have a dual switch with the low setting running all the time, right? If the box/closet gets too hot (i.e., over 85), the fan's kick in. Am I oversimplifying?

Correct. One of the worst things you can do for your equipment is constantly pull air through and load your equipment with the microscopic dust that likes to adhere to charged electronic circuit boards and processors. You only ever want the minimum amount of cooling necessary to keep the equipment in the 85 to 90 degree range. Having a thermostatically controlled variable speed fan of the appropriate size and CFM for your calculated thermal load and cubic volume is critical for ideal temperature control. Using a single fan to pull from two different cubic volumes with two different thermal loads is not something I would ever recommend - i.e. like the proposal above to use a single in-line fan to pull two radically different cooling loads and volumes. It is extremely difficult to dial in and I believe that the fan is overpowered for what is needed, although I haven't done the load calcs and recommended CFM yet for Nick.
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