Barricade vs. Dricore - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 30 Old 11-05-2010, 06:17 PM - Thread Starter
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My local HD has Barricade and Dricore on for virtually the same price (20 cents different per panel).

-Both are about the same thickness - (Dricore is 7/8th inch and the Barricade is 1 1/8" thick)
-Both have claims about water. Dricore has a lot more channels. My basement is very dry, and has a "diaper" around it - I'm not too worried about water
-Barricade has a 1/2" foam insulation under the OSB, and so claims to be 15 deg. warmer than the concrete. I am interested in that (I'm in Canada).

For a HT, is one product better than the other? I plan to put carpet pad and carpet on top in the room. From a sound treatment perspective which wins?

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post #2 of 30 Old 11-05-2010, 06:48 PM
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Hi Damon,
I have the Ovrx Barricade in my basement. I absolutely love it. I covered approx 1500 sq ft of my 2200 sq ft basement, and the temp is much improved. You can walk on this stuff barefoot in the winter and not get cold feet, and I don't even have carpet down yet. I went with it over the Dricore for two reasons. One being the insulation. The other was noise. I had read in other reviews of the Dricore that anything other than a level floor required you to shim it. Otherwise, the plastic would click against the concrete when you walk on it. Also that it had a type of 'hollow' sound. I think others here have posted that the Dricore has the problem of retaining water in the little plastic cups on the bottom in the event that you take on water in the basement. The Barricade uses XPS foam:

"A critical factor affecting long-term performance is the ability of an insulating material to resist the intrusion of moisture. Moisture can come in contact with insulation not only during construction, but throughout the life of the building. If absorbed, its effect is to drastically reduce thermal efficiency (R-value). The closed-cell structure and lack of voids in XPS helps the foam to resist moisture penetration better than other types of insulating materials. The excellent moisture resistance of XPS foam insulation has been confirmed repeatedly and consistently in laboratory tests and under field use conditions. "
"Because XPS foam is essentially a plastic material, it will not corrode or rot or support the growth of mold or mildew. It is resistant to microorganisms found in soil and provides no nutrient value to vermin. These properties make it an outstanding insulating material for below grade applications."


The channels in the bottom of the panels allow air to move underneath the floor which will also keep moisture from building up.
See my build thread for some pics. You cant go wrong with the Ovrx.
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post #3 of 30 Old 11-05-2010, 07:33 PM
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Yep I couldn't agree more with the warmer floor. I just laid it in my basement and can already notice a difference walking around. I am in Canada as well and that was one of the reasons I went with the barricade.
The installation is very similar with tongue and groove ends. It also has a small area built in for moisture at each end. It seems like a solid product.

+ 1 for barricade
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post #4 of 30 Old 11-05-2010, 07:41 PM
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Do you need to work with tiles or could you work with 4x8 sheets of foam and OSB.
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post #5 of 30 Old 11-05-2010, 07:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Do you need to work with tiles or could you work with 4x8 sheets of foam and OSB.

That would work. So 1/2 inch foam and 1/2 inch osb tongue and groove and the glue the osb to the foam? I do like the idea of fewer seams...

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post #6 of 30 Old 11-05-2010, 08:24 PM
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On an episode of Holmes on Homes there was one where he did a similar floor. I remember he taped the foam seams. It might have even been thicker foam.
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post #7 of 30 Old 11-05-2010, 08:40 PM
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Have you considered Platon with OSB on top?

I'm in Canada as well - I have the Platon with 3/4 TG OSB and I find it incredibly warm. Not to mention much more cost effective.
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post #8 of 30 Old 11-06-2010, 06:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

On an episode of Holmes on Homes there was one where he did a similar floor. I remember he taped the foam seams. It might have even been thicker foam.

I saw that episode, IIRC he used 1.5" on the floor and 2" on the walls (or vice versa!!) Either way it was thicker than 1/2".

I think they also tapconed the plywood to the concrete.

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post #9 of 30 Old 11-06-2010, 07:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mels View Post

Have you considered Platon with OSB on top?

I'm in Canada as well - I have the Platon with 3/4 TG OSB and I find it incredibly warm. Not to mention much more cost effective.


This is what I did. But man, was it a pain in the rump to install. The Platon was always trying to curl up at the ends. Can't argue with the final product, though. Very warm and comfortable on the feet.

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post #10 of 30 Old 11-06-2010, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damonbrodie View Post

My local HD has Barricade and Dricore on for virtually the same price (20 cents different per panel).

-Both are about the same thickness - (Dricore is 7/8th inch and the Barricade is 1 1/8" thick)
-Both have claims about water. Dricore has a lot more channels. My basement is very dry, and has a "diaper" around it - I'm not too worried about water
-Barricade has a 1/2" foam insulation under the OSB, and so claims to be 15 deg. warmer than the concrete. I am interested in that (I'm in Canada).

For a HT, is one product better than the other? I plan to put carpet pad and carpet on top in the room. From a sound treatment perspective which wins?

I thank you very much for introducing me to Ovrx. I will be doing a home theater in my basement. I found the product that I will use. I hope to start within a couple months.
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post #11 of 30 Old 11-06-2010, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Yep I think I'm going to use it as well.

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post #12 of 30 Old 11-07-2010, 03:46 AM
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I used 3/4" 4*8 sheets of t&g foam with 3/4" 4*8 sheets of OSB on top. I just glued to the floor and between sheets. I also taped all the seams with tyvek tape. It feels like a main level floor now.
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post #13 of 30 Old 11-07-2010, 06:44 AM
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One tip if you use the 4x8 sheet method mentioned; lay the OSB at right angles to the foam. When you glue the OSB, it will help tie the two sheets of foam together. I think you could skip the adhesive to the floor and just use it between the foam and OSB.
Also, if you plan on covering with carpet, you will probably need to put a few Tapcons in the middle of the floor/room to keep it from bowing up in the middle when they stretch the carpet. This was a suggestion from the Ovrx site, but I think it would apply to this situation as well.
Good luck!
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post #14 of 30 Old 11-07-2010, 07:47 PM
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Interesting. I used DriCore for the office previously built and extended that out a bit to the area at the base of the stairs, but stopped there. So here's a new question: can you tie the Ovrx into the DriCore?

Also does anyone have a comparison of DriCore to Ovrx that's not anecdotal? I noticed a pretty good temperature increase (increase in insulative ability) in the one room after we put in the DriCore, so I guess I'm asking how much better is the Ovrx?
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post #15 of 30 Old 11-07-2010, 07:53 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by morgbug View Post

Interesting. I used DriCore for the office previously built and extended that out a bit to the area at the base of the stairs, but stopped there. So here's a new question: can you tie the Ovrx into the DriCore?

Also does anyone have a comparison of DriCore to Ovrx that's not anecdotal? I noticed a pretty good temperature increase (increase in insulative ability) in the one room after we put in the DriCore, so I guess I'm asking how much better is the Ovrx?

The orvx is 1/4" thicker than dricore, so mating the two will need some creativity I think. The orvx claims a 15 deg F increase in temp of the floor. I haven't found a temp claim for dricore. The orvx has to be warmer though - it has foam insulation instead of the hard plastic water channel on the dricore...

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post #16 of 30 Old 11-08-2010, 08:26 PM
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Thanks for that. The 1/4" difference could prove problematic though. I wasn't ever planning on doing the carpet myself anyway, so I'll probably drop by my carpet guy's shop and ask him what he thinks and if can do anything to smooth it. Maybe putting extra underlay on the dricore area? Thankfully it's only an area of about 8x8'.
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post #17 of 30 Old 11-09-2010, 03:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by morgbug View Post

Thanks for that. The 1/4" difference could prove problematic though. I wasn't ever planning on doing the carpet myself anyway, so I'll probably drop by my carpet guy's shop and ask him what he thinks and if can do anything to smooth it. Maybe putting extra underlay on the dricore area? Thankfully it's only an area of about 8x8'.

I you want to even them out the just put down a layer of 1/4" plywood over the drycore. I know HD sells it in 2x2 panels so it is easy to work with

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post #18 of 30 Old 12-02-2010, 06:07 PM
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I used the 6' rolls of platon in my last house with 3/4 OSB on top...the final product was fine, but like another poster already mentioned, it was more difficult to work with as the roll kept trying to roll back up.

I just ordered 200 Barricade tiles a few weeks back from Rona and they should be here in the next day or so.

Working with the 2X2 sheets of OSB around corners and jack posts would seem to be a lot easier than working with 4X8 sheets. I went with the platon/OSB combo in my old place to save some cash, but decided this time around that I'm more concerned with ease of install over the few hundred extra dollars. I was able to get the Barricade tiles for $5.97 each and saved another 10% during a "scratch and save" promotion so I'm happy with the cost. Based on the threads I've read, I think I will be happy with the purchase.
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post #19 of 30 Old 12-02-2010, 07:15 PM
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Dricore
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post #20 of 30 Old 06-23-2012, 08:16 AM
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For those of you who are thinking of using Platon, just one word of caution. I used it to finish my basement as an underlayment, with tongue and groove plywood on top, attached with tapcons to the cement, and was very pleased with the result. Unfortunately, we had some water infiltration a few weeks ago, not too much, we thought we could just change the laminate floor, but it turns out that the concave side of the bubbles on the Platon retained all the water and mold and rot set in, on the undeside of the plywood. We have to redo the whole floor - thank goodness the insurance is paying, but it's a pain in the neck. We are going with Barricade this time.
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post #21 of 30 Old 08-29-2012, 11:19 AM
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For those of you who chose to use the Barricade, how did it go? Happy overall? I'm leaning that way, but haven't yet ruled out Dricore.... all the shows seem to use Dricore, and I haven't seen any use the Barricade yet.
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post #22 of 30 Old 08-29-2012, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
all the shows seem to use Dricore

Don't get me wrong, because I DID use Dricore, but "all the shows" come from Canada and Dricore is a Canadian product.

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post #23 of 30 Old 08-29-2012, 12:13 PM
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Anybody use Tyroc? (http://www.tyrocinc.com/)

I was considering it for my basement and theater but don't know too many people who have used it. I like how it can handle getting wet (have 0 water issues though) and that it's only 1/2" high.

Any cons against it?

JJ
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post #24 of 30 Old 02-27-2014, 02:05 PM
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Tyroc seems like it'd be warmer than some subfloors, but trades r-value for its low 1/2" height vs Barricade.

 

Basement Systems sell a tile that's like $5+ a square foot and that may not include install. No r-value, they say.

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post #25 of 30 Old 03-02-2014, 10:50 PM
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I used the Platon with OSB, and cannot tell a temperature difference barefoot from upstairs. The Platon was a PITA to lay flat at times, but using a lot of tape helps to keep it down, as well as heavy books on the corners while you get the OSB down.

The main reason I went with the Platon/OSB over the Dricore was cost - you get a physically similar (or superior, depending on if you like seams) product for less than half the cost. I believe I paid about $85 for the Platon roll and $96 for 6 sheets of OSB, compared to about ~$450 for Dricore tiles and shims.

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post #26 of 30 Old 04-08-2014, 08:19 AM
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Here's what I'm considering. I live in North Dakota, so I'm fighting a 50 deg slab. 50 degrees may not sound super cold, but keep in mind it's conducting directly against the floor.

I'm looking for low expense, less loss of ceiling, more resistance to water and less mold (I've had problems with both), and more insulation. I want it all! :)

I'm considering countering the loss of ceiling height with replacing my ceiling tile grid with CeilingLink or CeilingMax, gaining me a couple inches back, as their grids attached directly to joists.

 

Product Layers Insulation Height Lost Liquid Water Resistance Water Vapor Resistance Expense Notes
DriCore Medium-Low. Air gap and less surface contact. Medium Up to the height of the plastic. Destroyed if water is > .5" and reaches OSB. Medium. Gaps between tiles can let vapor hit OSB. Medium
$1.80 / sqft?
 
Platon+OSB Same as DriCore Medium Same as DriCore. High. Platon seams are taped. Low  
DeltaFL+OSB Same as DriCore? Low Same as DriCore?   Medium? Less clicking with landscape fabric?
DMX+OSB            
1" XPS+OSB High: foam. High Thicker foam = more height above water. High. The foam is a vapor retarder. Low.
More DIY.
 
InsulArmor H3 (XPS+OSB) High: R3 foam Medium-High Foam is ~.5", so about what DriCore is? Water channels on bottom of XPS. High. Foam = tongue & groove, taped seams ?  
InsulArmor HD (XPS) High: R5 foam High High. Foam is 1". Water channels on bottom of XPS. High. Foam = tongue & groove, taped seams    
Ovrx Barricade (XPS+OSB) High: foam. High Thicker foam = more height above water. High. The foam is a vapor retarder. Medium-High?  
Tyroc tiles Low. Low Tyroc can be submerged. Less height means the damage happens to whatever is above the tile. Medium-High. Are the seams tapes or glued or just snapped? High
$5 / sqft ?
 
ThermalDry tiles Low. Low Tiles can be submerged. Less height means the damage happens to whatever is above the tile. Medium-High. Are the seams tapes or glued or just snapped? High
$5 / sqft and Basement Systems must install.
 

 

The weak link in many of the systems is that the top substrate for adding ceramic, laminate, carpet, etc. is organic. Is there something like Barricade that uses plastic instead of OSB?
 

Maybe we can help fill this in and make it resource to help others?

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post #27 of 30 Old 04-09-2014, 09:39 AM
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Excellent summary Eyleron, thanks!

Question concerning the wood substrate - you have labeled as "Platon+OSB" in the table above. Most are recommending T&G plywood which I assume is due to keeping the floor even and interlocked together while not being too rigidly attached to the subfloor (concrete in most our cases). Has anyone used OSB (non-T&G material) and what were your thoughts? OSB is cheaper, easier to work with (in theory) but would require some other means to interlock the pieces, I would think...

I am concerned about loss of ceiling height in my application and therfore plan to use Platon. I have used DITRA material a lot for under tile work (thanks to M.Holmes), and Platon seems very similar and easy to use. No luck finding it in a retailer out here on the east coast yet and Menards will not ship to me per their website...
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post #28 of 30 Old 04-09-2014, 10:15 AM
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Yeah, really all of the OSB references should be OSB/plywood. Unless one wanted to treat them as different methods.
 

They do make OSB t&g that resists water: Advantech: http://www.huberwood.com/advantech/performance/moisture

 

So in recent years (last 2-4?) there's plywood and OSB for water resistance. Not sure which is better?

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post #29 of 30 Old 04-09-2014, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eyleron View Post

I'm looking for low expense, less loss of ceiling, more resistance to water and less mold (I've had problems with both), and more insulation. I want it all! smile.gif

The weak link in many of the systems is that the top substrate for adding ceramic, laminate, carpet, etc. is organic. Is there something like Barricade that uses plastic instead of OSB?

One consideration that I'd say warrants its own column in the table is Labor so it can be a distinct value versus Product Expense, whether it's DIY or contracted. Assuming DIY, then I'd say:

1" XPS+OSB= High
Ovrx Barricade (XPS+OSB)= Low

I've done both, and the Barricade was easy to do versus sheet XPS and OSB. I actually used 1/2" XPS+TG Plywood but same labor. The reason it was high was because of all the tapcons that had to be installed. It took a lot of time to do this, and I'll never do it again.

Something else to consider is while carpet is what everyone should use for flooring in their theater, and carpet needs a wood subfloor for nailing strips etc, for the benefit of others not building a theater, but looking at installing a subfloor for the reasons you mention, is to consider just the insulation layer and laminate wood floors. The PSI rating on XPS is sufficiently high that you could consider doing 1/2" XPS and 12mm laminate wood floors for less than a 1" loss in ceiling height.
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post #30 of 30 Old 04-10-2014, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Swervepf View Post


One consideration that I'd say warrants its own column in the table is Labor so it can be a distinct value versus Product Expense, whether it's DIY or contracted. Assuming DIY, then I'd say:

1" XPS+OSB= High
Ovrx Barricade (XPS+OSB)= Low
 

 

Good ideas!  I copied the list to its own thread here: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1526646/list-of-basement-theater-sub-floor-products-methods/  I added your labor column to the list there.

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