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post #271 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 08:15 PM
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TMcG may have the best solution - hiring it out. But I don't give up that easily! wink.gif

I'm not very good with sketchup, but I've added some extra angles to your pieces to help them wrap. As Peter said, they'll need to be bigger. The wider the pieces (fewer joints) the larger the blanks will need to be. The math to figure out how big they need to be is beyond me.

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post #272 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 08:37 PM
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Maybe this will give you some ideas ...



Cheers,
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post #273 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 08:39 PM
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Again, as Peter said, at the seams of these blocks, the profile fills the block, so if the profile were rotated smoothly through the curve, it would extend beyond the limits of the block.

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post #274 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 08:43 PM
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A couple more views ...





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post #275 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 08:46 PM
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One last one ...



Cheers,
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post #276 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 08:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter M View Post

What total angle of curve are you going around ?

What is the inside radius of the curve ?

There are two corners, both 45 degrees, one inside, and one outside.

The radius of each is 15", measured to the point shown below:


Thanks!
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post #277 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 09:01 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Peter M View Post

One last one ...



Cheers,

Wow, incredible! I can see it so perfectly on the screen... now if I could just pluck that out of virtual reality and onto my bar, I'd be set! smile.gif

These do help because they picture where I need to be. I'll play around with another prototype tomorrow and see where I get.

I have so much respect for someone who can model stuff so competently in Sketchup. Awesome stuff...

Bryan
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post #278 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 09:11 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Again, as Peter said, at the seams of these blocks, the profile fills the block, so if the profile were rotated smoothly through the curve, it would extend beyond the limits of the block.


Thanks, Fred. I hope that I'm complicating it too much by adding the second axis of rotation in, as you pointed out earlier. I'm further hoping that moving the router exactly in the plane of the bar surface, which is what I need to marry up to, will be key.

When I have the workpiece skewed at an angle during machining (which is effectively what I'll eventually do for the straight pieces) and then rotate that up for installation, then the router moves along some other path, which is why -- I think -- the piece ends up not fitting.

I'm lame at Sketchup and explaining this, but a little better at making sawdust. Hopefully that will yield something tomorrow morning...

As I said, as you already did, wish me luck... again!! wink.gif
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post #279 of 422 Old 11-11-2013, 09:11 PM
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If only my woodworking skills matched my Sketchup skills !! biggrin.gif

Love your work !!

Cheers,
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post #280 of 422 Old 11-12-2013, 01:48 AM
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Bryan - check this video out with the tilted router jig. Seems like it would work in your situation, although a bit of time to construct the jig: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-FxDj10Fhc&feature=share&list=SP0CFBF09C2948FDF2

And in action making curved molding








Probably looking better and better to hire out this portion of the project.
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post #281 of 422 Old 11-12-2013, 09:01 AM - Thread Starter
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Wow, that was pretty impressive. Thanks, Tim! Envious of that tilting router setup...

I'm going to head out to my shop now, glue up some 3" stock, and see where that gets me. I'll give it one more shot before I wave the white flag and pull out the checkbook... smile.gif
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post #282 of 422 Old 11-12-2013, 09:11 PM - Thread Starter
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Bar Railing - Day 2

Things went better today, I'm happy to report!

Started the process by gluing up two ~3" thick slabs:


From there, it was time for the sections to be joined together. First was to drill the holes for the hardware:



I called upon my old Shopsmith for the horizontal holes:



Glued up and joined:



The two curves, ready for milling:



Mostly through the bottom part of the inside corner:



Looks a lot better this time!



The fit is good. It'll need to be scribed onto the surface of the granite but fundamentally the curves work now:


So, it's back out to the shop to continue this process for the other curve, mill out the top profiles, and then get the straight sections milled and joined with these curves. Stay tuned...
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post #283 of 422 Old 11-13-2013, 06:55 AM
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Good call with the 3" slabs. Why bother with the double miter, if you're going to need thicker stock anyway.

Is this the final material, or is this a test run with "disposable" stock? (Looks like the good stuff.)
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post #284 of 422 Old 11-13-2013, 08:13 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Good call with the 3" slabs. Why bother with the double miter, if you're going to need thicker stock anyway.

Is this the final material, or is this a test run with "disposable" stock? (Looks like the good stuff.)

Thanks! Yup, I decided that it was going to be so much work to mill these corners that I might as well just take my time and do it once on the final material. Hopefully the end of today will tell if this will all come together as planned...
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post #285 of 422 Old 11-13-2013, 09:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Bar Railing - Day 3

Well, a long day in the shop, but I'm certainly not going to complain about time spent there... always quality time! smile.gif

I picked up from where I left off yesterday, still milling the curves, but the top side profiles now. Here's the inside corner starting to get machined:
d1_zpsdb6dd4d0.jpg


Done with the first passes; still fairly rough:
d2_zpsc911c340.jpg


And basically completed -- I went back and tried to knock down some of the big ridges with light, secondary passes:
d3_zpsc51c7cb3.jpg


Then a few passes on the router table with a 7/8" roundover bit installed finished off the lower edge:
d4_zpsc55a9b0c.jpg


On to the outside corner. On this one, I decided to hog out most of the material with my most aggressive bit, a 1/2" solid carbide spiral (though still many multiple passes, about 1/8" or so plunge per pass):
d5_zpscdb831c4.jpg


Then a long 1/2" straight cutting bit to define the outside edge:
d6_zps3c599007.jpg


Followed by multiple passes with the 1/2" round nose bit. That resulted in a pretty good fit on the bar:
d7_zpsc25d1e18.jpg



One minor problem -- some chipout from me getting too aggressive on the routing operation:
d8_zps5d946057.jpg
This is on the part of the curve that rests on the granite, so it would definitely be visible...


A goofy clamping setup to glue in a replacement piece:
d9_zps2d3070f0.jpg


And repaired. Hopefully only I'll know it's there when everything is done...
d10_zpsba19260b.jpg



Now on to the straight pieces. SO much easier! smile.gif

First I milled out the bottom profiles with a dado set, tilted at 21.5 degrees:
d11_zps1ede7606.jpg


Then I used the table saw to cut the main coves in the middle of the top profile:
d12_zps7653b8d5.jpg
For this cove, it involved running the piece diagonally across the blade at a 53 degree angle, raising the blade very slightly with each pass. I've never done this technique before but I was pleased with how well it worked!


And back over to the router table to create the edge roundovers:
d13_zps0c5655d4.jpg


Those machining steps got things pretty close for the straight pieces. Then it was over to the workbench for some quality time with my block plane and a little profile template that I'd use to check my progress:
d15_zpsa4b7e8ea.jpg
After all that machine work, it's always so nice to remove the ear plugs and just use hand tools...


Finally, it was time to join the curved and straight pieces and start the final fitting. A block plane, a riffler file set, a curved scraper, and, of course, sand paper:
d14_zps1060e1aa.jpg


I didn't completely finish tonight but I'm only missing the last little piece on the right side, which should be pretty easy:
d0_zpscb8c337c.jpg
As you can see, I still need to complete the finish work on that outside curve which I'll do once I join up that last straight section.


A close-up of the inside curve. Still needs quite a bit of sanding, and the color match between the two pieces of wood isn't great, but hopefully my finisher guy can fix that:
d16_zps7bd681b8.jpg


And the left end, where it hits the theater wall. I did need to mill out a little relief on that so it would fit inside the door casing:
d17_zpse101ca40.jpg


This has been one tricky portion of the overall project and I can't tell you how relieved I am that I'm nearing the end of it. Thank you very much to those who pitched in to help or just to lend an encouraging word! smile.gif
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post #286 of 422 Old 11-14-2013, 02:01 PM
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Cowger..Nice Job on the rail, very impressive!!.. I dont know which I enjoy more, seeing the finished product, or the little gages and fixtures you build in the process.

I began following your thread ~ 6 months ago and have since been trying to derive the appropriate adjective to properly express's my impressions of your work. Today, I settled for " Prodigious", not because I feel this is the most appropriate description of your craftsmanship, but because the other words were just too hard to spell. wink.gif

Thanks for sharing.

Brad

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post #287 of 422 Old 11-14-2013, 06:16 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by KNKKNK View Post

Cowger..Nice Job on the rail, very impressive!!.. I dont know which I enjoy more, seeing the finished product, or the little gages and fixtures you build in the process.

I began following your thread ~ 6 months ago and have since been trying to derive the appropriate adjective to properly express's my impressions of your work. Today, I settled for " Prodigious", not because I feel this is the most appropriate description of your craftsmanship, but because the other words were just too hard to spell. wink.gif

Thanks for sharing.

Brad

Thanks Brad! This very nice compliment made my day!! biggrin.gif
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post #288 of 422 Old 11-14-2013, 07:48 PM
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Outstanding work ... hugely impressive as always !

Cheers,
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post #289 of 422 Old 11-15-2013, 10:50 AM
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Outstanding. smile.gif
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post #290 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 10:40 AM - Thread Starter
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The final design element for this project will be the "top shelf" liquor bottle display. I've planned for this space from the beginnning, just under the bar's TV and in the center of the back bar, but hadn't really given it much thought as to the details until now.

Here's roughly what I'm thinking:
Capture_zps42cd03cc.jpg

Couple notes:
- The columns are meant to be scaled-down versions of the ones in the front of the bar.
- The back wall (shown gray) of this will be mirror (though I don't know how to make that in Sketchup).
- The glassy-looking parts of the shelves will be frosted glass, with strips of RBG LEDs a few inches underneath them. Hopefully the frosting of the glass will effectively diffuse the LED light to make it seem like just one big glowing source of light.

I'm struggling a bit on what to do with the columns... two or four of them? Having two is certainly easier but may make it seem like the front of what's above is supported but the rear isn't. But with the mirror, you may perceive the illusion of having four... If I put four in, one in each corner, then the rear columns are just 11" tall, versus the fronts at around 19" -- in that case would I just cut them off so only the top 11" is shown? Or somehow scale them to be shorter (without making them look squashed)?

The other challenge is that the back shelf only has just over 11" of headroom, so that will need to be reserved for shorter bottles (for reference, a bottle of Remy XO is 8.5").

Any and all ideas are welcome! And if anyone wants my Sketchup model to play around with, I'd be more than happy to share!! smile.gif

Bryan
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post #291 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 11:02 AM
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I'd be tempted to say zero columns, because that's more room for booze! smile.gif But if you want to stick with columns I'd say go with the two that you are presenting in the drawing with one change....I'd dump the column's pedestals (having them terminate directly with the bottom of the cabinet recess) and make the full left to right space into shelving for the bottles otherwise the bits at the side would seem like wasted space.

I'd also change the stairstep so the rise is solid mahogany and the run is the frosted acrylic panels. I think it looks better than a full acrylic stairstep and it would be much easier for your to construct as a single assembly.

You illustrate this:


I'm proposing this, only in Mahogany for the rise, of course.

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post #292 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 11:53 AM - Thread Starter
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I'd be tempted to say zero columns, because that's more room for booze! smile.gif But if you want to stick with columns I'd say go with the two that you are presenting in the drawing with one change....I'd dump the column's pedestals (having them terminate directly with the bottom of the cabinet recess) and make the full left to right space into shelving for the bottles otherwise the bits at the side would seem like wasted space.

I'd also change the stairstep so the rise is solid mahogany and the run is the frosted acrylic panels. I think it looks better than a full acrylic stairstep and it would be much easier for your to construct as a single assembly.

Thanks, Tim! I think this is what you're suggesting:


I like that... Seems a bit more traditional and thus more appropriate for this style of bar.

Other thoughts?
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post #293 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 11:58 AM - Thread Starter
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No column base on the left vs. with base on the right:

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post #294 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 12:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowger View Post

No column base on the left vs. with base on the right:


Close. I was suggesting to go with something like the column on the left, so no pedestal underneath the column like on the right. Further, I was proposing to extend the lighted acrylic step the full width instead of leaving any mahogany on the sides.
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post #295 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 07:07 PM
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Awesome workmanship on the bar. I am impressed!
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post #296 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 07:59 PM
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+1 on no column base and full width acrylic.

And to my eye the columns could be a bit more slender.

Cheers,
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post #297 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 11:03 PM - Thread Starter
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While I ponder what to do with the liquor display, I've been turning my attention to the other end of the room, where we have a card table, dart board, etc. As you can see, it still has the basic base molding from when we built the house, along with no crown molding:



And the door to outside, which we upgraded to Mahogany, still had the original painted casing:

I'm not sure they ever had that installed there straight. Or maybe I just forgot to take a "before" picture until I was well into demo... smile.gif


I wanted to replace that with Mahogany casing that matches what I did in the theater. That meant getting some 5/4 rough stock:



Running it through the jointer to get one face straight:


And then through the planer to get it to thickness:

Note the arrows... When running it through the planer, I try to get an idea of which direction the wood likes to be machined. I've found that what works best in the planer will help things when it comes to the molder.


Here are the two knives, mounted in the molder:



And here's a shot of the rough wood going into the molder and door casing coming out the back. This is always a fun process for me!



Unfortunately, though two of the pieces came out looking good, the top piece in this picture got some pretty bad tearout in about a 2" long section (adjacent to the dado blade):



Since I didn't have any more 5/4 stock and didn't want to have to go get some just to fix this, I decided to cut out the bad section and re-join the two pieces with a biscuit:



Here's the fixed piece, along with the section I removed:

That joint will be mounted down around shin level on the door, and hopefully only I'll know that it's there once the finish gets applied. Along with any of you who come to visit, I suppose... smile.gif
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post #298 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 11:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Next is base molding. Again wanting to match what I did in the theater, I made the base out of three pieces: 6" wide plywood on the bottom + 2 milled pieces of solid wood on top.

I was able to get two of the pieces of plywood joined using pocket screws, but the results weren't nearly as good as when joining solid wood:



The 2nd piece is just a 1/2" thick piece with a bullnose, and a rabbet cut along the bottom so it sits on top of the plywood and covers that rough edge:



The 3rd piece is milled using this router bit:



The best way I could figure out how to run that is via a somewhat unconventional method in which the wood passes between the fence and the bit:

That, of course, requires that the wood is fed backwards, from left to right. I did three passes to ease the amount of wood being removed at one time.


Here's how the base goes together. Pretty simple...



To minimize nail holes in the top piece, I use this hot melt polyurethane glue:

I like this because the glue will hold a piece securely, even if you've had to force it into place, after just a minute of pressure.
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post #299 of 422 Old 11-19-2013, 11:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Finally, crown molding. Many years ago I had purchased the crown that I used for the theater. Unfortunately, I didn't have enough to go all the way around the room, so I took a piece of paper, traced around the old molding, and sent that to a guy who makes custom knives:

In about 3 days he sent back the blue template that he made from my drawing along with 2 custom-ground knives.


After running some stock, here's a comparison between the new stock (behind) and the old stock (darker brown):

Close enough for me!


Then it's just a matter of ripping the back bevels on the table saw:



I used these little helpers to hold up the crown while I fiddled with it:

Worked great.


Here's the door with the new casing:

I'll have my finisher do a wood faux finish on the remaining white of the door jamb. He did an entire door for us before, which turned out great, so I'm confident he can make that go away nicely.


And the new base and crown around the card table:

I'll eventually want to case out the windows with real wood, but that can wait for another project...


I did manage to finish up the bar railing:

I couldn't figure out anything better so I just terminated the end of the railing with a flat cap.


And today I started work on the plumbing for the external CO2 distribution for the kegerators. Here's a shot with the flash on in order to show detail:



And here's what it looks like normally. I used a bit of extra LED strip lighting to illuminate the gauges:



The list of woodworking "to do" items now fits onto the back of an envelope. Getting there...
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post #300 of 422 Old 11-20-2013, 04:37 AM
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Looks great Bryan. Nice work.

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Is it solipsistic in here, or is it just me?
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