DIY Custom-Printed Movie Poster Acoustic Panels - cheap! - Page 56 - AVS Forum
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post #1651 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 08:09 AM
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post #1652 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by kmhvball View Post
Has anyone used Fabric Mate track's with these fabric posters? I realize they are only 1", but my desire is more focused on Aesthetics than acoustic benefits per se.
Not everyone has posted how they built their frames but in general many seem to use 3" with 2" of insulation and 1" of air space towards the wall. If you use less then you'll have less attenuation and performance, especially at the lower midrange. On the flip side, any treatments are better that none. If you could go up to 2" that would get you closer to the performance that others seem to be shooting for...but 1" is still better than no treatments.

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post #1653 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 10:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmhvball View Post
Has anyone used Fabric Mate track's with these fabric posters? I realize they are only 1", but my desire is more focused on Aesthetics than acoustic benefits per se.
I don't think that anyone has used a track system (although I was just thinking about adding to my theater experience and using some tracks...on my ceiling. I would say though that if you are already adding a nice hiding space for some acoustical treatments, then maybe you could add some other spots...

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Not everyone has posted how they built their frames but in general many seem to use 3" with 2" of insulation and 1" of air space towards the wall. If you use less then you'll have less attenuation and performance, especially at the lower midrange. On the flip side, any treatments are better that none. If you could go up to 2" that would get you closer to the performance that others seem to be shooting for...but 1" is still better than no treatments.

David
Agreed that 1" will improve on the upper frequency absorption which will reduce a lot of high echo noise in the room. Just don't go floor to ceiling with 1" material! Some reflection and diffusion is important too.

With that said, and I know where David was going with this, just having 1" treatments actually may degrade the acoustics in the room. If your room's acoustical "problems" (all rooms have them) is in the mid range or low end (every room has low end problems), and the upper frequencies are actually fine. Absorption of those already good uppers will just compound the potential "muddiness" of the mids or lows.

Again, I know where David was going with his statement, and 99% of the time, that is probably good advice for someone who doesn't want to measure their rooms acoustics. I just wanted to point out the potential 1% issue.

If I was doing something with only 1" of space, I would leave some areas with no treatment (maybe 40%, off the top of my head), put 10% diffusion up near the front of the room, and then use 50% absorption of some sort. That can certainly include some 1", but bass traps and something with 2-4" somewhere would be nice.

Again, your call. It is your room, and yes, you will notice an improvement with some 1". Just don't kill *all* of those high frequencies without taming some mids and lows.
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post #1654 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickbuol View Post
I don't think that anyone has used a track system (although I was just thinking about adding to my theater experience and using some tracks...on my ceiling. I would say though that if you are already adding a nice hiding space for some acoustical treatments, then maybe you could add some other spots...

Agreed that 1" will improve on the upper frequency absorption which will reduce a lot of high echo noise in the room. Just don't go floor to ceiling with 1" material! Some reflection and diffusion is important too.

With that said, and I know where David was going with this, just having 1" treatments actually may degrade the acoustics in the room. If your room's acoustical "problems" (all rooms have them) is in the mid range or low end (every room has low end problems), and the upper frequencies are actually fine. Absorption of those already good uppers will just compound the potential "muddiness" of the mids or lows.

Again, I know where David was going with his statement, and 99% of the time, that is probably good advice for someone who doesn't want to measure their rooms acoustics. I just wanted to point out the potential 1% issue.

If I was doing something with only 1" of space, I would leave some areas with no treatment (maybe 40%, off the top of my head), put 10% diffusion up near the front of the room, and then use 50% absorption of some sort. That can certainly include some 1", but bass traps and something with 2-4" somewhere would be nice.

Again, your call. It is your room, and yes, you will notice an improvement with some 1". Just don't kill *all* of those high frequencies without taming some mids and lows.
Thanks for your thoughts..

My overall plan for 'sound treatment'... is something like this:

Use 2" of a Ductliner product on the screen wall (1" layer, a 6 mil 1" poly layer, and another 1" layer), floor to ceiling (using an AT screen), and am doing floor to ceiling 'fabric panels' using Fabric Mate tracks (current plan) of different 'back fills' on the side walls. I am planning on 1" ductliner on the side walls from floor to ~ ear height (stepped up for 2nd row ear height). Above that, I planned to use poly cotton type batting for some diffusion. My tentative plan is if I can figure out how to do these Fabric Posters - I would use the poly-fill behind those. I'll have 3 columns on each side which will be partly MDF creating some deflection & partly 'open' fabric covered panels filled with pink fluffy for some absorption. The rear wall will be 1" layer of Duct Liner as well.

I am also planning to cut a few 'vents' in the perimeter of my Riser, and have it filled with pink fluffy, hoping for some bass trap type benefits. I figure if I can learn how to measure my room, I can then 'adjust' as needed - adding or removing treatments behind the walls, given the fabric mate structure makes materials removable. I could also later add some 'bass traps', i.e., the corner OC 703 type things later if needed.

I was thinking if I could put the Custom Printed Fabric panels 'flush' with the balance of my treatments, that it might look 'nice', and make it a little less bland than solid colors. I like the idea of movie posters, given the obvious theater theme - but do worry about about 'dating' the theater, although, if I upgrade a few / year as I have seen suggested on here - that could keep it a little more fresh. The other alternative is finding Art, Sports Team images, or family photos which are less 'dated' (although, family photos probably need updated periodically with younger children as well).

I have never used photo shop or any similar photo editing, so, not exactly sure if I'll go this path as all the DPI & pixel data seems a bit daunting.
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post #1655 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 12:35 PM
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Nickbuol - I was thinking all of that...yep........or methinks you give me too much credit.

Kmhvball - I'm not sure 1" on the front and back wall is enough, especially on the back wall as you don't want any reflections off the back wall. Beastaudio tried a few things on the front wall and is happy with his current setup...you might want to ask him about what he used...cheaper too since you can get it from an HVAC supplier.

Regarding the sides, I'm with Nickbuol that if you're doing floor to ceiling, you might have too much absorption, especially at the high frequencies and not enough in the midrange.

And you mention about maybe adding corner traps...you should consider those at any 90 degree angle including ceilings to wall.

Also, you mention trying to keep everything flush...or maybe that's what I read but some diffusion and multiple levels is a good thing too.

But overall it sounds like you're focused on designing a nice room, it should be nice. Don't let the details of the pictures slow you down, there are several of us that can and will help you.

David
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post #1656 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 01:13 PM
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Got my first trial order from Spoonflower and they look amazing. The quality of the printing is just fantastic. Photos don't come close to showing the quality, it's that good. Of course I used the high-est res images I could find and photoshop to enhance them but still, just wow.

Has anyone used 1/2" MDF to make their frames? I've got 4 sheets sitting around (my friend believed to his core using MDF instead of drywall for walls, ceilings and bulkheads was the smarter, easier and cheaper way to go) and now he's trying to insist I use it all up. My concern with MDF, especially 1/2", is that it would flex and possibly droop along the top and bottom.

Also, what's the air passage like for the performance knit material? I'm thinking of using some to 'close off' the space around the projector without actually building a box that would contain all the air and heat. Would this stuff (or another tested material) work well for allowing heat dissipation?
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post #1657 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 01:32 PM
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post #1658 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Batiatus Rules View Post
Got my first trial order from Spoonflower and they look amazing. The quality of the printing is just fantastic. Photos don't come close to showing the quality, it's that good. Of course I used the high-est res images I could find and photoshop to enhance them but still, just wow.

Has anyone used 1/2" MDF to make their frames? I've got 4 sheets sitting around (my friend believed to his core using MDF instead of drywall for walls, ceilings and bulkheads was the smarter, easier and cheaper way to go) and now he's trying to insist I use it all up. My concern with MDF, especially 1/2", is that it would flex and possibly droop along the top and bottom.

Also, what's the air passage like for the performance knit material? I'm thinking of using some to 'close off' the space around the projector without actually building a box that would contain all the air and heat. Would this stuff (or another tested material) work well for allowing heat dissipation?

I had originally bought a sheet of 1/2" MDF that I planned to rip down to make my frames with, but I don't have a large table saw, so I was fearful of making straight rips. I took it back and got some 1x4 which gave me a 1.5" air gap behind my 2" insulation. The MDF is a good option if you can get it ripped as it is solid, smooth, and less expensive.
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post #1659 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 08:35 PM
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I've got a full shop to use so ripping the MDF isn't a problem (just fricken dusty). I was just concerned with it's flex. Seems finding 40" of clean, straight dimensional lumber has been rather difficult, unless I go with super expensive red oak!
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post #1660 of 1675 Old 10-13-2014, 09:48 PM
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When I built Coach's treatments for him, I used 1x4s, cut them in half, and then glued some 3/4" plywood in the middle. I wanted to make sure there wasn't any wood movement.

David
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post #1661 of 1675 Old 10-14-2014, 06:16 AM
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Quote:
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I've got a full shop to use so ripping the MDF isn't a problem (just fricken dusty). I was just concerned with it's flex. Seems finding 40" of clean, straight dimensional lumber has been rather difficult, unless I go with super expensive red oak!
I used poplar. It is a lot easier to find some straight pieces, has a smoother finish, etc than pine. I still say that MDF will work. Put a brace across the middle and it will be rock solid.
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post #1662 of 1675 Old 10-14-2014, 08:48 AM
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I used poplar. It is a lot easier to find some straight pieces, has a smoother finish, etc than pine. I still say that MDF will work. Put a brace across the middle and it will be rock solid.
we used "black label" from Menard's to build our movie screen - a tad expensive but it was absolutely perfect in terms of being straight and no warp.
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post #1663 of 1675 Old 10-14-2014, 09:06 AM
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^^^Good point JRock.

I used finger jointed pine for my 138" screen frame. Super straight and easy to work with for not much $$$, but the finger joints would show up for a poster frame probably... Behind my Seymour XD screen, you can't see any wood texture anyway. Just another option too if someone wants to sand a little.
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post #1664 of 1675 Old 10-17-2014, 11:13 AM
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In case anyone is curious about using these ideas in alternative ways, I wanted to use the same idea for picture frame types of things (not movie poster sizes nor having the acoustic backing but effectively imitating picture frames). I don't really have the tools to cut and customize the frames so I wanted to find something else.

At hobby lobby you can buy these stretcher strips - http://shop.hobbylobby.com/products/...-strip-592063/ - in a variety of sizes. 8,9,10,11,12, and then 14-40 in 2" increments, as well as 48". The pieces fit together (you probably could staple/glue them but I didn't even bother) to make the frame and are CHEAP. The four pieces for a 8x10" frame set cost me a total of about $3.00 which is obviously cheap. Even if I went with a 48x24 frame I think the total would be around $15/frame. The edges are raised so only a small portion of the fabric on front is touching.

They work GREAT for this and are super cheap. I wanted to test how this works for the potential of xmas gifts this year and so I had printed a fat quarter (27"x18") print on the silky faille.

If you are just making pictures to put on walls or otherwise this is a really cheap and easy way to make the frames.

The combination is good. A few notes:
  • You CAN stretch the SF material to tighten it up
  • The frame is slightly noticeable on a white background and not at all noticeable on darker backgrounds
  • When cutting the SF material, I recommened using heat on the edges to melt them together first (especially for smaller frames) - the SF material frays somewhat easily and if you don't have much to work with you can lose some of it. Alternatively making the print 2" or larger eliminates this problem as you can just tack further back and trim the frayed material
  • Having about 1.5" worth of fabric makes this trivially easy to tack on the back

Hopefully this is useful to someone else. The final product looks amazing on my first attempt. I made a test print with a picture of my fiance and myself and originally wanted to give it to her but might keep it myself as it looks really nice
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post #1665 of 1675 Old 10-17-2014, 11:14 AM
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In case anyone is curious about using these ideas in alternative ways, I wanted to use the same idea for picture frame types of things (not movie poster sizes nor having the acoustic backing but effectively imitating picture frames). I don't really have the tools to cut and customize the frames so I wanted to find something else.

At hobby lobby you can buy these stretcher strips - http://shop.hobbylobby.com/products/...-strip-592063/ - in a variety of sizes. 8,9,10,11,12, and then 14-40 in 2" increments, as well as 48". The pieces fit together (you probably could staple/glue them but I didn't even bother) to make the frame and are CHEAP. The four pieces for a 8x10" frame set cost me a total of about $3.00 which is obviously cheap. Even if I went with a 48x24 frame I think the total would be around $15/frame. The edges are raised so only a small portion of the fabric on front is touching.

They work GREAT for this and are super cheap. I wanted to test how this works for the potential of xmas gifts this year and so I had printed a fat quarter (27"x18") print on the silky faille.

If you are just making pictures to put on walls or otherwise this is a really cheap and easy way to make the frames.

The combination is good. A few notes:
  • You CAN stretch the SF material to tighten it up
  • The frame is slightly noticeable on a white background and not at all noticeable on darker backgrounds
  • When cutting the SF material, I recommened using heat on the edges to melt them together first (especially for smaller frames) - the SF material frays somewhat easily and if you don't have much to work with you can lose some of it. Alternatively making the print 2" or larger eliminates this problem as you can just tack further back and trim the frayed material
  • Having about 1.5" worth of fabric makes this trivially easy to tack on the back

Hopefully this is useful to someone else. The final product looks amazing on my first attempt. I made a test print with a picture of my fiance and myself and originally wanted to give it to her but might keep it myself as it looks really nice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enderland View Post
A few notes:

  • When cutting the SF material, I recommened using heat on the edges to melt them together first (especially for smaller frames) - the SF material frays somewhat easily and if you don't have much to work with you can lose some of it. Alternatively making the print 2" or larger eliminates this problem as you can just tack further back and trim the frayed material
Conceptually I understand the notion of 'melting' the edges and that makes sense, but "How" do you recommend doing this... A high heat Iron? A Heat Gun? Something else?
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post #1667 of 1675 Old 10-17-2014, 01:55 PM
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this thread needs some videos...
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post #1668 of 1675 Old 10-17-2014, 08:11 PM
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Conceptually I understand the notion of 'melting' the edges and that makes sense, but "How" do you recommend doing this... A high heat Iron? A Heat Gun? Something else?
I just used a lighter with a flame (this is a very fast "cauterizing" process).
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I just used a lighter with a flame (this is a very fast "cauterizing" process).
That would be my preferred method too. For those who have never done this, do NOT burn the material (like you could do to a nylon rope to prevent the end from fraying). Just keep the flame moving back and forth and don't melt it too much.
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post #1670 of 1675 Old 10-18-2014, 06:25 AM
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And you do this before you cut? When I have used lighters in the past for rope, etc, it was always after cut....
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post #1671 of 1675 Old 10-18-2014, 06:56 AM
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And you do this before you cut? When I have used lighters in the past for rope, etc, it was always after cut....
After cutting. It is more important if you have a small amount of fabric to tack on the back as fraying will cause more problems.

I used an exacto knife to cut the fabric too, with a 1meter metal ruler as a guide (I couldn't cut nice straight lines to save my life! haha).
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post #1672 of 1675 Old 10-18-2014, 07:14 AM
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Full res pics: http://imgur.com/a/870Dx#Tp9uWam

Finished product!



This is what the frame looks like:


Some of the SF print mid-chopping.


Super easy to tack staple.


This was also surprisingly easy to do corners like this. Don't tack the sides too close to the corner initially (leave maybe an inch or so).


You can barely see the frame even this close up.


With sunlight streaming through the back...

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post #1673 of 1675 Old 10-18-2014, 08:37 AM
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Great job and result Enderland! Thanks for sharing.
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post #1674 of 1675 Old 10-18-2014, 08:38 AM
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We've used those same frames for several of these posters in our kids' bedrooms. And I'm actually ordering three more prints from Spoonflower right now for the same purpose, and they'll each be 24x18 posters for the kids.


I use wood glue in the joints, though.

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post #1675 of 1675 Old 10-18-2014, 12:44 PM
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I use wood glue in the joints, though.

I assumed I was going to want to, but after checking for fit in the store, I couldn't get them apart so I figured they probably weren't going to fall apart on me...
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