Simple Texas theater - nearing completion - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 38 Old 07-04-2013, 05:07 AM
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Very nice job! I just completed my "Second Row Bar" a few months ago and it is one of the best upgrades I have done in the room. 

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post #32 of 38 Old 07-04-2013, 10:00 AM
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Really nice and reasonably simple. You are obviously very skilled with the wood too and I have a couple of questions please.

The cabinets ... you said Lowe's but I don't see them (as you said). Can you elaborate on them a bit more? Is it one unit (size?) of two units stacked? Did you make the door face and size?

On your front wall I don't understand how it is make. Is it out from the back wall (how far) and the speakers behind? If so did you just make if as a frame and did you cover it with something? Looks like you put the black soundproof material on the wall behind the screen ... ?

Where did you get the material for your wall panels and is it expensive?

Again, real nice build and looks exactly what I have in mind - simple, clean and efficient design and not quite so "decorative and theoretically perfect"
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post #33 of 38 Old 07-04-2013, 06:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rader View Post

I was planning on building knockoffs of the RPG BAD panels based on their patent and published whitepapers.

The panels are constructed of 3/4" plywood. I made them 2 1/4" wide, to accommodate 2" of linacoustic (2 layers x 1" each), with room for 1/8" perforated hardboard for diy attempt at diffusive absorption panels (similar to BAD panels).

I think the patents expired, didn't they? There seem to be a number of commercial knock offs with similar designs. No harm for DIY, but I bet it kills them to see others having commercial success with their IP.

 

 

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post #34 of 38 Old 07-05-2013, 09:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rexlan View Post

Really nice and reasonably simple. You are obviously very skilled with the wood too and I have a couple of questions please.

The cabinets ... you said Lowe's but I don't see them (as you said). Can you elaborate on them a bit more? Is it one unit (size?) of two units stacked? Did you make the door face and size?

On your front wall I don't understand how it is make. Is it out from the back wall (how far) and the speakers behind? If so did you just make if as a frame and did you cover it with something? Looks like you put the black soundproof material on the wall behind the screen ... ?

Where did you get the material for your wall panels and is it expensive?

Again, real nice build and looks exactly what I have in mind - simple, clean and efficient design and not quite so "decorative and theoretically perfect"

The cabinets are one unit per side. In the second picture of this thread you can see that I built a rectangular base for the cabinet to sit on, which raises the cabinet up about 8 inches. I did that to get the shelves at a more comfortable height for me. I could have added additional shelves above that, but figured that one set of shelves per side is plenty. Currently, that space behind the upper door on each side is just empty space - you can see the top of the cabinet, look behind the screen wall, etc. Right now I'm storing my camping sleeping bags stacked up to the ceiling behind the top door. LOL.

Also in the second picture, you can see from the base under each cabinet, I added 2x4 sides that go up to the ceiling to a cross piece - effectively creating a rectangular frame. The top is attached to the ceiling with construction adhesive and a few screws to keep it in place. The center two frames are just that, rectangular frames made out of 2x4 - actually I ripped them down to 2 1/2 inches wide to get a little more space on the floor behind the middle of the screen wall for subwoofers to go. The alder face frame is just that, a face frame glued to the 2x4 side frame, with openings that line up with the cabinet, and the upper area. I put on 2 doors for esthetics. One door and a massive open area of just wood didn't look right to me, so I added a second door to balance the look of the face frame all the way up to the ceiling.

The cabinets and their frames are 24" out from the wall, and the center screenwall is 18" out from the wall. I like how the screenwall is recessed relative to the cabinets, and the side frames taper back at an angle (look at the first sketch up picture/drawing) esthetically, and it gets the screen 6" further back from the viewing position than if it were flat all the way across. That being said, 18" is very limiting as to what you can put behind the middle section. Most of the larger commercial subs won't fit, and you have to get more creative with DIY subs. If I had it to do over again, I make it 24" across the whole front, or bring the cabinets out another 6" and make it 24" in the middle, and 30" on the sides.

The panels that go around the frame are made out of 3/4" thick pine frame with acoustically transparent cloth (GOM FR701) covering. There's a ton of great threads on here on how to make these frame and panels, so just do a quick search and you'll come up with days of reading on that. smile.gif My frames are sized so they are a press fit. No glue or nails to hold them in place. They're very snug, but if needed I can remove them to move speakers around, get to wiring, etc.

The side acoustic panels on the wall are covered in upholstery fabric. Nothing special there. I went to an upholstery store in town and looked for something that I liked to go with the decor, then made sure it wasn't rubber backed and I could blow air through it without too much trouble. The other shoppers may look at you a little funny walking around trying to blow air through fabrics in the store... As to expense, I can't recall exactly how much I paid. Maybe $12-15 a yard? The prices in that store ran the gambit from clearance $3/yd to $40/yd.

The black stuff on the back wall is 1" linacoustic - a black fiberglass sheet. I used it to line the front wall to absorb high frequency reflections off the back of the screen, and doubled it up to 2" for the inside of my wall panels. It was press fit in the panels so I've been able to add or pull pieces out of the panels to adjust the amount of absorption to taste.
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post #35 of 38 Old 07-05-2013, 09:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabident View Post

I think the patents expired, didn't they? There seem to be a number of commercial knock offs with similar designs. No harm for DIY, but I bet it kills them to see others having commercial success with their IP.

I don't know if they've expired. It would be great if there was an option to purchase just the grating material.
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post #36 of 38 Old 07-05-2013, 09:58 AM
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Thanks for the information. So, you made the door faces ... well above my pay grade. Can these be bought someplace?
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post #37 of 38 Old 07-05-2013, 12:58 PM - Thread Starter
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They're custom made to fit the room and cabinet exactly, so no.

You're best bet for the face frames is a cabinet shop, in which case just have them make cabinets to fit your room to whatever specs you desire with a thin piece of moulding on the side to tuck the edge of the fabric frame behind.

Don't know how much that'd cost but couldn't hurt to price it out.

I'm a hobbiest woodworker so I took it as an opportunity to learn some new skills and justify buying a piece of equipment or two I could use for other projects. LOL.
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post #38 of 38 Old 07-08-2013, 11:01 PM - Thread Starter
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Trim done with rail and stile bit - CHECK!

Sanding done - CHECK!

Time to move on to staining. The gaps at the bottom of the bases will be covered with the base molding. I'm staining that separately and attaching it last so I can mask off the carpet better during the stain and sealer. I plan on using the same stain regimen as the front cabinetry. 1/2 lb shellac coat to even the grain for the stain. Then General Finshes Brown Mahogany stain - 2 coats. Then clear times a bunch of coats.

P7080006.jpg

P7080005.jpg

P7080007.jpg

The eyebrow detail on the end was a pain in the &%#, but goes with the detail in the front doors, so I figure it was worth the effort. Only one major boo-boo, we'll see if anyone pics it up. smile.gif

Best,
Christopher
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