Fabric Wall Build on top of existing panel? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 07-31-2011, 10:11 AM - Thread Starter
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I am going to build fabric walls and trying to decide if I should install them on top of the existing panel in the room? See pic below.

It will serve as backing for the acoustic treatments under the fabric and would still be there if I ever took out the fabric walls, so wanted to get input from the group. Thanks!



I debated about posting this within another post I made about how to hide staplest, but I was thinking this is a different question - please let me know if I shouldn't have posted this separate.
LL


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post #2 of 6 Old 07-31-2011, 11:00 AM
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If there is nothing behind the panel you will leak lower frequencies out of the room like a screen window. I would take off and add a couple layers of drywall. Of course that suspended ceiling needs to go as well.

If you could care less about sound containment just leave the paneling assuming it is tight to the studs and won't rattle. Hang your fabric right over it. The paneling will be a poor anchor for furring so you will need to keep that in mind.


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post #3 of 6 Old 07-31-2011, 12:07 PM - Thread Starter
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If I leave it up, the furring strips will be screwed into studs behind it. I'm trying to avoid drywall to 1) preserve the width of the room which is only 10' 7", and 2) I absolutely hate doing drywall and I'll never get the project done.

Will Linacoustic 1" up to ear height and poly batting above that help with containment?


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post #4 of 6 Old 07-31-2011, 12:19 PM
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Nope. Your enemy is the sub-woofer rumble of action movies and it takes a well engineered room to stop it. As a general rule insulation only affects the higher frequencies and one inch is not going to do diddly. You can read more in the library at soundproofingcompany.com.


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post #5 of 6 Old 07-31-2011, 01:49 PM
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I couldn't be more pleased with how it turned out for me, and would definitely go this route again if/when I move and have to build a third theatre. I used to have my build pics posted online, but the webserver recently closed and I'll have to find a new host.
As others have said, I'd recommend hanging drywall first; the finish wouldn't have to look pretty because you'd be covering it over, anyway.
Before you do anything else, however, this is the best time to be sure you've run all the cables for A/V and lighting that you can ever imagine needing.

I applied the Fabricmate framing channel all around the room, using Liquid Nails glue and a finish nailer to tack it in place. Then I applied 1" panels of Roxul mineral wool up to 42" height, and poly batting above that level. These were held in place by a few dabs of LePage contact cement. Then the fun began with applying sheets of Guilford of Maine fabric (check their website - they'll mail you several free samples of your choice). You cut the fabric slightly oversize (I found Black and Decker electric scissors were GREAT for this) and then press the perimeter of the fabric into the Fabricmate gripping channel, using a pizza cutter. Every time you press fabric into the channel, it tensions the fabric, yet doesn't cut it or tear it, as you might think. It gives you a really professional looking finish without hundreds of staples, wrinkles and sags. I built my theatre about 5 years ago and I haven't had to re-tension any part of the fabric. Check out my low-res pic to see the finished result. I built a decoupled stage at front, filled with sand, and a riser at the rear for the second row of seats. PM me if you want more info - I could upload pics to my site at Box.net.
Good luck and have fun!
LL

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post #6 of 6 Old 07-31-2011, 07:24 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemoss
I couldn't be more pleased with how it turned out for me, and would definitely go this route again if/when I move and have to build a third theatre. I used to have my build pics posted online, but the webserver recently closed and I'll have to find a new host.
As others have said, I'd recommend hanging drywall first; the finish wouldn't have to look pretty because you'd be covering it over, anyway.
Before you do anything else, however, this is the best time to be sure you've run all the cables for A/V and lighting that you can ever imagine needing.

I applied the Fabricmate framing channel all around the room, using Liquid Nails glue and a finish nailer to tack it in place. Then I applied 1" panels of Roxul mineral wool up to 42" height, and poly batting above that level. These were held in place by a few dabs of LePage contact cement. Then the fun began with applying sheets of Guilford of Maine fabric (check their website - they'll mail you several free samples of your choice). You cut the fabric slightly oversize (I found Black and Decker electric scissors were GREAT for this) and then press the perimeter of the fabric into the Fabricmate gripping channel, using a pizza cutter. Every time you press fabric into the channel, it tensions the fabric, yet doesn't cut it or tear it, as you might think. It gives you a really professional looking finish without hundreds of staples, wrinkles and sags. I built my theatre about 5 years ago and I haven't had to re-tension any part of the fabric. Check out my low-res pic to see the finished result. I built a decoupled stage at front, filled with sand, and a riser at the rear for the second row of seats. PM me if you want more info - I could upload pics to my site at Box.net.
Good luck and have fun!
Wow, nice HT, your walls look super clean. I may need to take another look at the Fabricmate channel.


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