Best way to mount rigid fiberglass to underside of soffits - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 31 Old 11-29-2011, 04:52 PM - Thread Starter
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Just as the topic suggests. I am confused on how to do this .without it falling down later on. Thanks for any help
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post #2 of 31 Old 11-29-2011, 04:57 PM
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One method I recall hearing (from bpape I believe) was long screws and fender washers. In my case, I have a little 1/2" plywood ledge on one side, and 1/2" plywood soffit extension (for the cove / rope lighting) on the other side, so the fiberglas panels just slide in and rest on top of those ledges.

Not a great picture of it, but its all I have apparently:

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post #3 of 31 Old 11-29-2011, 06:13 PM - Thread Starter
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I am on my tablet so I cant see your pic. How did you get the panels between the two ridges?
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post #4 of 31 Old 11-29-2011, 09:42 PM
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Above the two 1/2" plywood "strips" on the edges, there is a bit more space on each side, so it was a matter of sliding the panel over one edge a little further than where it would end up resting, pushing the other end up, and then sliding it back onto that other edge. If that makes any sense at all.
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post #5 of 31 Old 11-29-2011, 10:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes it does
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post #6 of 31 Old 11-29-2011, 10:16 PM - Thread Starter
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That was a premature reply. I would have more of a problem , my soffits are 30" wide. So mine would require an inside and outside groove,plus a T groove in the middle. Which would look a bit retarded in my opinion.
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post #7 of 31 Old 11-29-2011, 10:28 PM - Thread Starter
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There must be other ways people have done this.
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post #8 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 02:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Please I am at this stage in my build. I am at a loss for ideas other than gluing them up with construction adhesive and holding them in place with supports until dry. This would take forever.
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post #9 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 02:44 PM
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A method I used for my front wall (behind the false wall) was to use roofing nails, and nail through the fiberglas panels into the wall studs. Roofing nails have big wide heads, so they hold up the panels well. You could do the same for in the soffit, if you hit the joists - and if you can find roofing nails that are long enough. Or, if you have 2x members spanning the bottom of your soffits (like I do - see previous picture), you can put the roofing nails, or nails/screws with fender washers, into those members, with the head or washer hanging off to the side to catch the fiberglas sides. Or you could improvise by using thin metal like 1" x 6", screw the middle into the members, and then the long ends of the metal support the fiberglas.

Maybe post a picture of your soffit, if none of those suggestions seem to help, I'm not sure what yours looks like, how deep, what there is behind it that could support the fiberglas, etc.
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post #10 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 02:51 PM
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Rare earth metal magnets is one way and there is a specific fastener made for ceiling mounted panels greater than 1.5" in depth. 1" depth is pushing it for the fasteners. I would use the magents for the 1" or less and the specially made fasteners for thicknesses greater than 1". Hope this helps.

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post #11 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 03:32 PM - Thread Starter
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My so
Ffits are all made out of osb. My rigid panels are 1.5" thick. And they are black faced. I was going to try a method that wouldnt require covering up with material. As the black on the panels looks very nice. They run the full length and width of the room
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post #12 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 03:39 PM - Thread Starter
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And Mike are you referring to the cloud fasteners? If so I checked them out and dont understand how they work totally
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post #13 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 03:42 PM - Thread Starter
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Also thanx for helping out
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post #14 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 03:57 PM
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Ask for the company to send you a sample of the cloud fastener. They should just rotate into the material then snap into a fastener screwed to the ceiling. Pretty easy and simple actually if we are thinking about the same fastener. Good luck!

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post #15 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 04:10 PM - Thread Starter
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How do you lign up the fasteners. Is it simple or a pain? I think we are talking about the same things.
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post #16 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 04:26 PM - Thread Starter
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Also how hard to put into osb as that stuff is hard to screw into?
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post #17 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 04:31 PM
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No need for OSB. Use rigid panelling without the plywood. Adds unecessary weight. The panels are plenty rigid without the need for that. Use OC 705 instead of 703. Not terrible to put up.

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post #18 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 04:36 PM - Thread Starter
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The osb is already up and ready. And yes it was heavy and way overkill.
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post #19 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 04:45 PM
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Last week I came across these screws that have 9/16 inch wide flat heads. Then you just add the press on black peal and stick heads and you are done.





They come in various lengths and should be perfect.


http://www.cabinetparts.com/g/powerh...-wood-fastcap/
http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/fas...cover-caps.asp
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post #20 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 05:19 PM
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Does anyone have pictures of soffit-mounted acoustic board? I'm trying to figure out the best way to make it look good.
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post #21 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 05:30 PM
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I would run a decorative molding of some kind that is 1 inch thick on the outside edge of the soffit. Then make fabric covered panels with acoustical board inserts and mount under the soffit.

From the Bacon Race:





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post #22 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 07:21 PM - Thread Starter
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I wish I could see your pics better. Between the tablet and my eyes it makes it real hard. I will say this though your theater looks awesome. I hope mine looks half that good.
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post #23 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 07:53 PM
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I wish it was mine, I helped Damelon build his. I can see the pictures just fine on my 24 inch diagonal monitor.
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post #24 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 08:04 PM
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Cover in pegboard is another option, depending on purpose

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I must admit to not having really paid attention to the intended energy needed to be mitigated or to the the actual design goals, so please bear with me as I am simply responding to methods that have proven to be useful for the support of non- or semi-rigid porous materials at similar orientations...

Assuming that one is not into designing a tuned rigid perforated absorbent membrane (which is actually not difficult!), an alternative material that provides superior support without overly imposing its own characteristics upon the task is to use common plastic orchard bird netting*. Not only is is relatively low cost (if you look a bit) and easy to work with in conjunction with any number of commonly available fasteners as well as fastening topologies.

Supported at reasonable intervals one can avoid sag while providing more than adequate support over and around even irregular surfaces, further augmented by its tensioning.


*Various perforated and expanded metals are also useful and effective, although at generally higher cost.
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post #26 of 31 Old 11-30-2011, 08:46 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I wish it was mine, I helped Damelon build his. I can see the pictures just fine on my 24 inch diagonal monitor.

Haha I wish I had a 24" screen
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post #27 of 31 Old 12-02-2011, 03:55 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragonfyr View Post

I must admit to not having really paid attention to the intended energy needed to be mitigated or to the the actual design goals, so please bear with me as I am simply responding to methods that have proven to be useful for the support of non- or semi-rigid porous materials at similar orientations...

Assuming that one is not into designing a tuned rigid perforated absorbent membrane (which is actually not difficult!), an alternative material that provides superior support without overly imposing its own characteristics upon the task is to use common plastic orchard bird netting*. Not only is is relatively low cost (if you look a bit) and easy to work with in conjunction with any number of commonly available fasteners as well as fastening topologies.

Supported at reasonable intervals one can avoid sag while providing more than adequate support over and around even irregular surfaces, further augmented by its tensioning.

*Various perforated and expanded metals are also useful and effective, although at generally higher cost.

I think this one shut us all up. Is it over my head? I would have to say yes.
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post #28 of 31 Old 12-02-2011, 03:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Has anybody else even tried leaving the black stuff uncovered? If I could get away with it. It would save me approximately 475.00 dollars
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post #29 of 31 Old 12-02-2011, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhale64L7 View Post

I think this one shut us all up. Is it over my head? I would have to say yes.

he said "you can hold up fiberglas using bird netting"
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post #30 of 31 Old 12-02-2011, 04:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhale64L7 View Post

Has anybody else even tried leaving the black stuff uncovered? If I could get away with it. It would save me approximately 475.00 dollars

Can't say I have seen anyone do that within the room - there are health concerns with exposed rigid fiberglas (even if it has a coating) - some leave it exposed if its behind a false wall. You can also use cheaper fabrics, such as speaker cloth, to cover it.
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