Cotton Batting (recycled denim) as sound absorbing insulation? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 30 Old 12-01-2011, 12:58 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
I am having a riser built in my finished home theater. Don't want fiberglass fibers released into the air. Does anyone know how cotton batts would perform in a broad bass absorbing riser as opposed to what people generally use ie fiberglass? I am thinking of using the batts made by Bonded Logic, called Ultratouch.

Since we are on the topic of green theater building materiels, is there a product that is more green than roofing felt for the in between layers of the top deck plywood? My top deck layers will be 3/4"+1/2"+3/4" I'm sure since it is petroleum based, it has some off gassing. Green glue is the only option I know, but it's fairly expensive? Are these dampin layers really needed, tempted to use Green Titebond construction adhesive then have it screwed down.
G-Rex is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 30 Old 12-01-2011, 04:35 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,724
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 234 Post(s)
Liked: 582
you can see how that compares to other products here

http://www.bobgolds.com/AbsorptionCoefficients.htm
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #3 of 30 Old 12-01-2011, 04:49 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Thanks for the link. I didn't see a 6" or 8" cotton batt on the list (only 2"), but Bondedlogic.com has the acoustic tests under "specs" on their web site....looks good.
G-Rex is offline  
post #4 of 30 Old 12-01-2011, 05:17 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Jive Turkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: good old USA
Posts: 1,461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 16
I retail UltraTouch insulation locally. We lined the walls of an office with it, and I don't worry about anyone hearing conversation.

I'd probably use it in the walls of my audio/video room if I had to do it over again. Surely it won't do much with bass, but then neither does fiberglass insulation. I haven't looked at it's specs in quite a while, but in practice I think it's a pretty good product.

See ya. Dave

"High Fidelity audio has been like a dog chasing his tail. High Fidelity in my marriage has been much more rewarding cause she knows where I sleep."
Jive Turkey is offline  
post #5 of 30 Old 12-01-2011, 06:50 PM
Senior Member
 
aackthpt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: In the mitten, USA
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Rex View Post

I am having a riser built in my finished home theater. Don't want fiberglass fibers released into the air. Does anyone know how cotton batts would perform in a broad bass absorbing riser as opposed to what people generally use ie fiberglass? I am thinking of using the batts made by Bonded Logic, called Ultratouch.

Since we are on the topic of green theater building materiels, is there a product that is more green than roofing felt for the in between layers of the top deck plywood? My top deck layers will be 3/4"+1/2"+3/4" I'm sure since it is petroleum based, it has some off gassing. Green glue is the only option I know, but it's fairly expensive? Are these dampin layers really needed, tempted to use Green Titebond construction adhesive then have it screwed down.

I don't think I've seen flow resistance values, so the Ultratouch can't yet be run in acoustic models. Opinion in the music studio community seems to be that it is too dense to be good in thicker devices or at very low frequencies. Neither is necessarily covered on the Bob Golds page, but the numbers there don't really bear that out so I don't think a decision can be made either way. *shrug* Someone did a pretty comprehensive survey of safety data for various fibers a while ago and it turned out that fiberglass was actually one of the safest - much safer based on currently available data. On what is your dislike of fiberglass based? How would fibers be released into the air; are you talking about during construction or all the time?

As for the roofing felt question, my understanding was that it is used to prevent rattles, and therefore more a mechanical bumper than acoustical damping. At that rate any thin foam or rubber would do - or eliminate the possibility the pieces could move/rattle between each other which construction adhesive would probably do.
aackthpt is online now  
post #6 of 30 Old 12-01-2011, 07:44 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by aackthpt View Post


I don't think I've seen flow resistance values, so the Ultratouch can't yet be run in acoustic models. Opinion in the music studio community seems to be that it is too dense to be good in thicker devices or at very low frequencies. Neither is necessarily covered on the Bob Golds page, but the numbers there don't really bear that out so I don't think a decision can be made either way. *shrug* Someone did a pretty comprehensive survey of safety data for various fibers a while ago and it turned out that fiberglass was actually one of the safest - much safer based on currently available data. On what is your dislike of fiberglass based? How would fibers be released into the air; are you talking about during construction or all the time?

As for the roofing felt question, my understanding was that it is used to prevent rattles, and therefore more a mechanical bumper than acoustical damping. At that rate any thin foam or rubber would do - or eliminate the possibility the pieces could move/rattle between each other which construction adhesive would probably do.

If I used fiberglass it would be John Mansville because it's formaldehyde free. The theater is finished, but for the riser. It's carpeted, fabric walls, screen is up...so a bit worried that the particles will latch onto the theater. Depending how the riser is built, if its a broad band base absorber, then ideally open venting would be used with a black out cloth over the insulation. In theory the insulation particles could still get out from vents and into air. Thought cotton would be the safer way to go, but if it impedes the riser as a bass trap I will have to reconsider. I could use fiberglass, and carpet over the holes and not use a carpet pad over side, front, back holes. This will restrict air a bit though, but in the low frequency range I wouldn't think it would matter much.

For the riser top deck, I was thinking of going with a thin foam underlayment that they use under a wood floor to quiet it down...such as the one made by Eternity. I would have the carpenter put down the 3/4 layer, then add a foam layer, then 1/2" plywood, then another foam layer with final 3/4" plywood. Of course all screwed down. Or I could just pay big $ for a 5 gallon tub of green glue and do it the proven way.
G-Rex is offline  
post #7 of 30 Old 12-02-2011, 06:54 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
If you want to select an insulation for environmental concerns the cotton may be a good choice, regardless of the cost.

If you want to select an insulation for performance concerns, especially in the bass region, then standard fiberglass is the choice.

If you want to select an insulation based on the low cost, then fiberglass is again the choice.

Also regarding the absorption coefficients, that data is not germane to the environment within a sealed wall or ceiling cavity. Those absorption coefficients are only relevant when discussing the surface absorption (when the insulation is mounted to the face of a wall as a panel). In-wall data is not the same as on-wall data.

This topic has been brought up for a few years on many different acoustic forums. A search of these forums will reveal that the general theater / studio design group do not spec much other than fiberglass for the reasons I posted. This is one of those times in life where the cheapest material happens to also be the best performance for our needs.

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #8 of 30 Old 12-02-2011, 08:06 AM
AVS Special Member
 
stockmonkey2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Utah County
Posts: 1,707
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Look at the Knauf ECOSE line of insulation. They eliminate the formaldehyde and a lot of other chemicals. Then cover the insulation (or the vents) to prevent fibers from escaping.
stockmonkey2000 is offline  
post #9 of 30 Old 12-02-2011, 12:51 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Thanks for the info. Looks like I should go fiberglass for the reasons Ted pointed out. Knauf Insulation seems one step greener than John Mansville. I emailed them to see where I can buy It. Do you guys feel that if I cover the riser's front, back, and side vent holes with carpet (with no rug pad above holes) that I will be compromising the riser's function as a broad band bass trap?
G-Rex is offline  
post #10 of 30 Old 12-02-2011, 02:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
localhost127's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 2,277
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by aackthpt View Post

Someone did a pretty comprehensive survey of safety data for various fibers a while ago and it turned out that fiberglass was actually one of the safest - much safer based on currently available data. On what is your dislike of fiberglass based? How would fibers be released into the air; are you talking about during construction or all the time?

http://www.gearslutz.com/board/bass-...rs-review.html
localhost127 is offline  
post #11 of 30 Old 12-02-2011, 03:55 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Very kind of you to post that excellent link.

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #12 of 30 Old 12-16-2011, 02:15 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:

Missed the link earlier. Very informative...thanks. There is enough info there to raise concern and limit exposure when possible. Aackphpt, yes I am comcerned about airborn particles released into the air in a finished theater during the construction of the riser that may never get out as it will cling to the fabric walls, carpeting etc. Looks like I am going with a sealed riser so other than offgasing, particles will unlikely get out.

Media, in the above Gear link, mentioned wrapping the insulation in a thin plastic membrane. If I leave my riser sealed ( and not vent it), then how would the Joghn Mansville formaldehide free insulation that comes sealed in the thin plastic membrane work? The plastic membrane has a pattern of very small holes in it. Would this have any detrimental effects on the acoustic properties of the fiberglass? ...or going with Knauf and precutting and wrapping the batts in a clear membrane outside, then bringing them in for installation. This would greatly reduce airborn contaminents into the room. If the riser is not vented, then mostly low frequencies will get in. I would think the bass would pass right through the plastic membrane...but could any middle or upper frequencies get into the riser and be effected bynthe plastic membrane?

The wool batts seem interesting, but the thought of a musty smell is not that inviting. Not sure how wool would perform being in a sealed riser.
G-Rex is offline  
post #13 of 30 Old 12-16-2011, 08:37 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
The thin plastic would not harm anything. Not enough of a mass to cause us issues. Any of those fiverous insulatons will work similarly presuming they are of similar initial density and we avoid compaction.

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #14 of 30 Old 12-16-2011, 10:04 AM
Senior Member
 
aackthpt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: In the mitten, USA
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Rex View Post

Missed the link earlier. Very informative...thanks. There is enough info there to raise concern and limit exposure when possible. Aackphpt, yes I am comcerned about airborn particles released into the air in a finished theater during the construction of the riser that may never get out as it will cling to the fabric walls, carpeting etc. looks like I am going with a sealed riser so other than offgasing, particles will unlikely get out.

LOL. The point of the link is pretty much that the fibers are not a concern. Formaldehyde or other solvents could be a concern, especially for rigid fiberglass boards which have a much higher level of binders. If you're _really_ concerned, unroll or unpackage it in your garage for a few days with a fan blowing over it and the garage door cracked. Do it a week if you're really paranoiac. In use, cover openings to it in fabric so that fibers won't make their way into the room in mass quantities if at all.

Then go watch some movies and stop worrying about every little thing!
aackthpt is online now  
post #15 of 30 Old 12-16-2011, 01:28 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by aackthpt View Post


LOL. The point of the link is pretty much that the fibers are not a concern. Formaldehyde or other solvents could be a concern, especially for rigid fiberglass boards which have a much higher level of binders. If you're _really_ concerned, unroll or unpackage it in your garage for a few days with a fan blowing over it and the garage door cracked. Do it a week if you're really paranoiac. In use, cover openings to it in fabric so that fibers won't make their way into the room in mass quantities if at all.

Then go watch some movies and stop worrying about every little thing!

I have read the link among many others that show conflicting info relative to the safety of airborn particulates. After reading the article what surprised me was how the cotton fibers could stay in the lungs indefinitely. I don't recall seeing Media's links to these studies advocating the safety or dangers of these particles.

The concerns of formaldehyde are a given....it's nasty and a known carcinogen. Phenol is also known to be quite toxic and a carcinogin. One rep at Knauf may have had little concern to the formaldehide and phenol in other company's insulation, but was that particular person qualified to make such a statement? I bet if i called another rep he would say the total opposite as would the medical community. I agree that once enough time has passed off gassing becomes a much lesser concern, though the product continues to minimally off gas for years. However, particle shards will stay in a room indefinitely. Fiberglass just needs to stay in the lungs long enough to scar them. Asbestos with its barb like shards anchors into lung tissue and is very difficult to expel. They both cause lung inflamation and scarring.

The medical community of which I have spoken with believes that the dangers of fiberglass particles will eventually be realized. I believe someone in that link stated the same re the medical community. Yes for now there is conflicting info. Fibrosis is something no one wants. If one has an underlying condition, such as asthma then particular caution should be used. My son is asthmatic and I am being careful for him and my family. My house was built with green products, green adhesives, paint poly and was insulated with cellulose so off gasing would be minimal.

I think being careful is prudent, especially in the days we live in where environmental exposure plays such a big role in rising cancer rates... particularly lymphoma. Lung cancer rates have also been rising even with nonsmokers and those with little to no second hand smoke exposure. I build things once and I like to do it right, especially when there are health concerns.
G-Rex is offline  
post #16 of 30 Old 12-17-2011, 11:24 AM
FOH
AVS Special Member
 
FOH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Midwest
Posts: 4,747
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 208
G-Rex; very good, thought provoking contribution.

------------------------------------
Flat, Deep, Clean, Linear, and Loud
------------------------------------
Active 16.8kw, 7.3 system
(3)Seaton Cat12C up front, (4)QSC K8 sides/rears
(2)Seaton SubM-HP, (4)18" IB
FOH is offline  
post #17 of 30 Old 12-17-2011, 07:07 PM
Member
 
hamptonht48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Clayton, NC
Posts: 97
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Check out my build thread, that's exactly what I used in both the walls and in my riser, which is built as a simple trap with a bit of resonator characteristics. It's less itchy than fiberglass, but wear a dust mask! I found putting a circular saw blade in backwards is a pretty good way to cut it, but it's not an easy chore! Still, very quiet, easy to use, and not a bad price when picked up here locally (I live south of Raleigh).

Hope that helps!

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1377460
hamptonht48 is offline  
post #18 of 30 Old 12-18-2011, 03:31 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

The thin plastic would not harm anything. Not enough of a mass to cause us issues. Any of those fiverous insulatons will work similarly presuming they are of similar initial density and we avoid compaction.

Thanks for the info Ted.
G-Rex is offline  
post #19 of 30 Old 12-18-2011, 03:38 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
G-Rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOH View Post

G-Rex; very good, thought provoking contribution.

Glad I could contribute. On a side note, my carpet in the theater is defective and needs replacing under warranty. I just learned that my carpet installer passed away from lymphoma. He was in his mid to upper 40s and had been installing and been around carpets for over 20 years. I know that carpets are riddled with chemicals which off gas for months. Is there a link between this off gasing and his cancer? It does make you think.

We can't avoid carpets in theaters, but there is always the option to go natural fibers, such as wool. I will likey go synthetic due to the design I want, but I will vent my home with an ERV (see below).

It's always advisable to install a fresh air intake in your home, such as an ERV or HRV. These units keeps in-home gases to a minimum by constantly exchanging the home's stale air with outside fresh air.
G-Rex is offline  
post #20 of 30 Old 12-28-2011, 04:07 PM
Senior Member
 
rms8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 238
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Just an FYI,

The OC pink fluffy is "...Verified to be formaldehyde-free"

See the Supercharged 10second II here :
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3131345
See the ConcreteBunker Build w/8x18" IB subs here:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1445270/27l-x-22w-x-10h-diy-concrete-bunker-w-eight-18-ib-subs/0_70

rms8 is offline  
post #21 of 30 Old 12-29-2011, 09:17 AM
Senior Member
 
aackthpt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: In the mitten, USA
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Rex View Post

-snip-I don't recall seeing Media's links to these studies advocating the safety or dangers of these particles.
-snip-
The medical community of which I have spoken with believes that the dangers of fiberglass particles will eventually be realized.
-snip-
I think being careful is prudent, especially in the days we live in where environmental exposure plays such a big role in rising cancer rates... particularly lymphoma.
-snip-

Not sure what "Media" you refer to here.

You spoke to _members_ of the medical community, which means you got opinions, not the opinion of the medical community or any sort of scientific consensus.

To tell you the truth, I don't really trust the outdoor air quality where I live either, making outdoor air exchange a bit less exciting.

There's a difference between care and prudence and paranoia. I'll take reasonable precautions also (and yes, I have plenty of asthmatic and allergenic people around) but there is also a point at which I fully intend to stop worrying and enjoy life.
aackthpt is online now  
post #22 of 30 Old 01-06-2012, 05:27 AM
AVS Special Member
 
localhost127's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 2,277
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 24
localhost127 is offline  
post #23 of 30 Old 01-09-2012, 11:32 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Looneybomber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 4,668
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 23
In regards to the UltraTouch cotton batting, my local HD only sells 2" thick batts of it, and it's not sold as "accoustic" insulation. There's no info on it in bobgold's website, so I was wondering if anyone has used it and what they thought.

It would help if I linked to the exact item.
http://www.homedepot.com/Building-Ma...atalogId=10053

YID DIY
Looneybomber is offline  
post #24 of 30 Old 12-30-2012, 10:08 PM
Newbie
 
skinnymonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looneybomber View Post

In regards to the UltraTouch cotton batting, my local HD only sells 2" thick batts of it, and it's not sold as "accoustic" insulation. There's no info on it in bobgold's website, so I was wondering if anyone has used it and what they thought.


It would help if I linked to the exact item.
http://www.homedepot.com/Building-Ma...atalogId=10053

I know this this thread is dead, but I was wondering the same about the UltraTouch via home depot if anyone has experience with it.
skinnymonkey is offline  
post #25 of 30 Old 12-31-2012, 09:56 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,724
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 234 Post(s)
Liked: 582
Ultra touch is one product from a company called Bonded Logic. If you dig around on their Wed site and do some Googling here is what I have found. The cotton batting sold as Ultra touch insulation has a density of 1 lb per cu ft. The acoustical batts they sell have densities of 3 and 6 lbs per cu ft. The published data they show for the acoustical batts indicates an increasing overall NRC rating with the increasing density.
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #26 of 30 Old 12-31-2012, 10:09 PM
Newbie
 
skinnymonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Ultra touch is one product from a company called Bonded Logic. If you dig around on their Wed site and do some Googling here is what I have found. The cotton batting sold as Ultra touch insulation has a density of 1 lb per cu ft. The acoustical batts they sell have densities of 3 and 6 lbs per cu ft. The published data they show for the acoustical batts indicates an increasing overall NRC rating with the increasing density.

Great, thanks for your input! I couldn't even find the R-8 product on their site.
skinnymonkey is offline  
post #27 of 30 Old 01-01-2013, 05:32 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,724
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 234 Post(s)
Liked: 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinnymonkey View Post

Great, thanks for your input! I couldn't even find the R-8 product on their site.

It is listed in their Construction Insulation PDF brochure but it only shows Acoustical data for the 3 1/2 inch

http://www.bondedlogic.com/pdf/denim-insulation/ut-denim-insulation-brochure.pdf
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #28 of 30 Old 01-04-2013, 09:46 PM
Newbie
 
skinnymonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

It is listed in their Construction Insulation PDF brochure but it only shows Acoustical data for the 3 1/2 inch
http://www.bondedlogic.com/pdf/denim-insulation/ut-denim-insulation-brochure.pdf

I contacted Bonded Logic yesterday regarding the product sold by Home Depot. They claimed a NRC of .85 on the 2" multipurpose.

I'm going give some a shot, it's on sale right now for 20% off and free shipping over $45.

Thanks again for the help.
skinnymonkey is offline  
post #29 of 30 Old 01-05-2013, 04:48 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Midland, MI USA
Posts: 8,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Curious, what is your attraction to this product? You've read above where it doesn't perform any better than fiberglass, cellulose, polyester or mineral wool?

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #30 of 30 Old 01-06-2013, 10:15 PM
Newbie
 
skinnymonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

Curious, what is your attraction to this product? You've read above where it doesn't perform any better than fiberglass, cellulose, polyester or mineral wool?

I've worked with fiberglass products over the years and my throat/lungs are very sensitive to it. I thought I'd give this a try since it's cheap. If it bothers me I'll remove it and nothing will be lost as I have no acoustic panels right now.
skinnymonkey is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off