235 Build - Page 13 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 1Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #361 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 08:33 AM
AVS Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 2,810
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 345 Post(s)
Liked: 322
The cut doesn't necessarily have to be in the corner - only removing enough material to have the OSB on the side walls drop 1/4" - 1/2" (or whatever is required).

The closest cutting circular saw I am aware of is the Dual Saw: http://www.hsn.com/products/dualsaw-1050w-counter-rotating-saw-and-accessories/6901847?sz=6704&sf=HO0230&ac=INCHO0230&cm_mmc=Shopping%20Engine-_-PLA-_-Home-_-6901847&channel=Froogle&mr:referralID=8635e10d-cdec-11e2-a969-001b2166c2c0

It has a double-wide kerf (two blades), so one saw line might do the trick and it would keep the cut as high up as possible FWIW.
TMcG is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #362 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 09:56 AM
AVS Special Member
 
J_P_A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: L.A. - Lower Alabama
Posts: 4,174
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 283 Post(s)
Liked: 269
Why is the 1/4" important? I must have overlooked it.

Dude, are you made of leprechauns? Cause that was awesome!

The Plains Theater Has Begun
J_P_A is offline  
post #363 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 10:23 AM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Wow thanks for all the support, very much appreciated!

NGiovas, My OSB walls are screwed directly onto the 2x4 wall. I would need to ensure the wall cut is above the highest screw holding up the walls. It sounds like this multi tool will ensure I can keep the cut close to the ceiling and therefore above the highest wall screws.

Mr Tim, The drywall and GG is already installed. If I use a 1/4 spacer then I can't visualize how I would then be able to extract the OSB stub in order to allow the ceiling to drop. I only have access from the inside of the room and there is no room behind the OSB to allow me to push it into the gap between the walls.........

Do they sell thicker blades so that 1 pass would relieve just enough pressure on the ceiling so it is no longer in contact with the joists?

TmCG, AirBenji, yes truly a huge PITA and to top it off there has been some uncomfortable tension with my contractor of late so I'm likely on my own for this fix. Good point about using a level to try and determine which sections might actually be an issue. I did try that but with some large areas of mud on the ceiling (not finished sanding yet) it is somewhat difficult to get a good read on this. Even after sanding I'm not sure how confident I would be with this technique. Thanks for the link to the cheaper tool.

J_P_A, I also like the skill saw idea because then I could control the depth of the cut. However as I noted above I need to keep the cut very close to the ceiling since the other walls aren't like this beam-wall I posted above. With the 3 other walls the wall's top plate would come up very close to the ceiling joists and I don't think the skill saw could cut close enough to the ceiling.


I am still worried about the close proximity of wiring behind the OSB. Do you guys feel I could carefully control the depth of the cut using a multi tool to avoid cutting into some wires? Maybe in those sensitive areas I could set the depth just a bit shy of cutting right through and then do some manual chisel work? Thanks again for all your suggestions!
235 is offline  
post #364 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 10:32 AM
AVS Special Member
 
NGiovas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by 235 View Post



Mr Tim, The drywall and GG is already installed. If I use a 1/4 spacer then I can't visualize how I would then be able to extract the OSB stub in order to allow the ceiling to drop. I only have access from the inside of the room and there is no room behind the OSB to allow me to push it into the gap between the walls.........
Drive a long screw into the wedge you cut out and pull it out.  This will allow you to get a good grip on it.


Do they sell thicker blades so that 1 pass would relieve just enough pressure on the ceiling so it is no longer in contact with the joists?
No, the blades are intentionally very thin.  Unfortunately, it will likely take two passes.

I am still worried about the close proximity of wiring behind the OSB. Do you guys feel I could carefully control the depth of the cut using a multi tool to avoid cutting into some wires? Maybe in those sensitive areas I could set the depth just a bit shy of cutting right through and then do some manual chisel work? Thanks again for all your suggestions!
I would cut all the way across a large section at a very shallow depth and continue to work deeper and deeper moving across.  I have found it easy to control.  I have use it to cut trim on a wall where I didn't want to cut into the wall.  It just takes time.  It won't be quick.
NGiovas is offline  
post #365 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 10:52 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
AV Science Sales 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: A beautiful view of a lake
Posts: 8,450
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 707 Post(s)
Liked: 547
If you know where the screws are, then I would go just below the cables and cut a wider strip out using a skill saw. Say a 4" wide strip. A carbide tipped blade will take out 1/8", so two cuts would give you the 1/4". Then lower the 4" piece down and fasten. Then take screws out of upper section and let it drop down to top of 4" strip. This will be much faster and no risk of hitting the wires. Also no tools to buy. If you cut where the wires are, then one mistake and you have an even bigger problem.

Mike Garrett, AV Science Sales Call Me: 585-671-2968
Email Me: Mike@AVScience.com
Brands we sell: http://avscience.com/brands/ 
Call for B-stock projectors
Stewart, Seymour, SE, SI, Falcon, DNP & more.
RBH, Martin Logan, Triad, Atlantic Tech., MK Sound, BG Radia, SVS & Def Tech, Denon, Marantz & Yamaha .
AV Science Sales 5 is online now  
post #366 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 10:59 AM
AVS Special Member
 
TMcG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Earth
Posts: 2,810
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 345 Post(s)
Liked: 322
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

Why is the 1/4" important? I must have overlooked it.

Meaning if the OSB is being "forced up" to touch the joists above (and thus defeating the purpose of the resilient channel), then maybe it will only take 1/4" or 1/2" of "release" so the back side of the OSB doesn't touch the joists above. I was only eyeballing the amount of drop needed from the picture and the diagram provided by 235. Just enough material removed to have the OSB not touch the joists above considering the resilient channel is recessed to preserve that extra 7/8" of headroom.
TMcG is offline  
post #367 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 11:24 AM
AVS Special Member
 
J_P_A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: L.A. - Lower Alabama
Posts: 4,174
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 283 Post(s)
Liked: 269
Sorry, TMcG, I was asking why does the cut have to be within 1/4" of the ceiling? Seems like as long as it's between the top channel (or row of screws depending on the building method) and the ceiling, it should work just the same. I won't harp on it anymore, but I think you would have much better depth control with a skill saw. Just set the depth to drywall plus the OSB plus another 1/16" and run it down the wall. If your OSB is within 1/16" of the framing, then even a multitool isn't going to help. If we're talking about a double stud wall, and the drywall is attached at the top anyway, then even cutting out a slice isn't going to let the ceiling drop since walls are attached to the framing.

Dude, are you made of leprechauns? Cause that was awesome!

The Plains Theater Has Begun
J_P_A is offline  
post #368 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 12:04 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
TMcG, I like those dual blades, they would likely remove enough wall material to allow a single pass. I only wish it had some type of depth control so I could avoid cutting too deep and hitting wiring.
235 is offline  
post #369 of 580 Old 06-05-2013, 12:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
HopefulFred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 2,934
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 227
I think Mike's solution is the best. It's definitely more work, but it's easier, and more reliable.

There are a couple potential problems with cutting flush up against the ceiling - the obvious one is cutting the cables. As Mike said, this will be a huge hassle if it happens. The other problem is you can't replace any material you remove. We can't know which sections of ceiling are pressed up against the joists. If you remove a quarter inch of wall and the ceiling doesn't come down, then you have cut a 1/4 inch hole in your soundproofing that you can only fill with caulk. On the other hand if you remove the top ten or 15 inches of the wall - so that you are below the top row of clips, you can make sure it's right all the way around without risking the cabling. Will these areas of wall be hidden in a soffit or behind fabric or something that makes the finish less critical? There are lots of priorities to balance, but I think removing the top section of wall makes the fewest compromises to the final result, while perhaps being less palatable immediately.

I agree with J_P_A that the depth control would be much better - not to mention quicker - with a skill saw, but if you cut anywhere between the corner and the top course of fasteners, the wall boards that you free are left hanging by mud in the corner and otherwise coming out and irreplaceable. If the ceiling were to come down and squeeze it all back together, it might stay together nicely - but what if it doesn't?

Also consider that as the ceiling rebounds in some places, it may crack the mud. It's much better to do this sooner.
HopefulFred is online now  
post #370 of 580 Old 06-06-2013, 12:54 AM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Based on what everyone is suggesting I see 2 main approaches:

Option 1) Use a multi-tool (Fein or other) that allows me to make wall cut(s) that is/are right up near the ceiling. Keeping the cut(s) near the ceiling should give me very good odds of remaining above the highest wall screws (especially the OSB screws). This should allow the ceiling to drop slightly without having to remove any screws.

Option 2) Use a skill saw and make a cut below the top row of wall screws. Locate the upper row of OSB layer screws beneath the drywall and remove then to allow the upper portion of the wall to shift down slightly before being refastened.

Option 1
+ If no drop detected then only opened up thin cut that can be caulked.
+ Don't have to locate and dig out screws under drywall and mud
- Could need more than 2 passes. If drop detected then perhaps make another cut to ensure enough clearance
- Some cuts close to wiring
- Stub OSB not fastened to anything


Option 2
+ Stay away from wiring
+ No stub piece of unfastened OSB
+ If no ceiling drop after screws removed then only lost blade-width on wall
- Have to locate and dig out screws under drywall and mud


Option 1 along beam wall with wiring......




Option 1 along other 3 walls......




Option 2 along other 3 walls.....





I hope I summed up the suggested main approaches fairly closely. I am leaning towards Option 1 mainly because I am unsure how I could locate and remove all those screws buried beneath the drywall and GG as required for Option 2. I looked over my pictures and video of the OSB stage but couldn't see where the screws were located. My main concern about Option 1 was the lack of control over the depth of the cut using a multi-tool and the associated risk of hitting wires beneath the surface. However it looks like Fein (maybe others too) does have some depth stop attachment that might do the trick. The other concern with Option 1 is the little unfastened OSB stub. For 3 of the walls I expect the wall's top plate will provide backing to prevent the stub from popping out of place. The beam wall won't have that backing but if the stub did tilt out of position then I would expect the wall's drywall layer would also provide the ceiling support.

edit: Oh and Option 3) Do Nothing. Part of me sees this contact with the joist simply as another whisper clip rigid connection between ceiling and joist. I thought I remember Ted saying there is nothing magical about the whisper clips. It's the channel and its flexibility that make this all work. Having the very edge of the ceiling touch the joist does not take away from the flex except at the very end of the channel......but who am I kidding, I doubt I would be able to leave it as-is tongue.gif

Thanks for all the great analysis on this major headache! I haven't ordered any multi-tool yet so if you have any more feedback then please feel free.....
235 is offline  
post #371 of 580 Old 06-06-2013, 11:39 AM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Sheesh such a flood of helpful advice and now crickets wink.gif
Is that a good sign? Thoughts on my summary?
235 is offline  
post #372 of 580 Old 06-06-2013, 03:22 PM
AVS Special Member
 
AirBenji's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 1,394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked: 76
Good summary. smile.gif

Unfortunately, there is no fun option here (master of the obvious, I know). Drywall has been up for a month and the GG will be fully cured...I know it remains somewhat elastic but I think digging the top row of screws out of that OSB sounds like an absolute friggin nightmare. frown.gif My palms are sweaty just thinking about it. So I vote for option one.

However, you need to assess how bad it will be if you cut one of the cables behind that OSB. It sounds quite possible that you'll end up slicing one, and if that's just going to open up a whole new can of worms, I might lean towards option two. That way you can just rip out a foot or so of wall and be 100% sure that the problem is corrected - and you don't have to worry about cutting cables. Ok now I vote for option two. Am I helping? Ugh rolleyes.gif

If you do go with option one, I would test all of the cables running through that area before you start your cutting and then test them again as soon as you're done. You don't want to go another ten steps down the path and then realize you have a big problem behind the wall.

Have you spoken to Dennis and/or Ted about this? Might be time to call in the big guns...maybe they have a creative solution we haven't thought of.

The Esquire Theater Construction Thread:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1289590
AirBenji is online now  
post #373 of 580 Old 06-06-2013, 06:46 PM
Member
 
xjagox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Maryland
Posts: 190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by 235 View Post

I was tidying up some wiring just outside the theater room and came upon this eek.gifmad.gifmad.gif
I kept a close eye on the contractor when he did the ceiling OSB and all was good. I didn't follow him when he later put up the OSB walls! Ugh. I told him not to leave any gap between wall and ceiling (per Mr Erskine and others) but I guess he took that a bit too far. I only have this type of access to a small portion of the theater so not sure if this is a problem all around. Looks like it might be too late to rectify this now unless anyone has any suggestions? What a huge disappointment after all this effort in soundproofing.


Could you use an oscillating tool to get in and just shave away a little chunk of the OSB right where it meets the joist, or is this only accessible enough to reach a camera up into?
xjagox is online now  
post #374 of 580 Old 06-06-2013, 08:01 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Only a small percentage of the ceiling is accessible as seen in the picture. However now that you mention it....the area that is accessible also happens to be where most of my wiring runs so maybe I can use a mix of cutting from inside and outside the room. Thanks!
235 is offline  
post #375 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 09:41 AM
AVS Special Member
 
cw5billwade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: GA
Posts: 1,488
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
Liked: 131
if i remmember your walls are floating on nails. Anyway to go to the bottom and use a skill saw to take out the nails. Whole wall will drop problem solved.
cw5billwade is online now  
post #376 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 10:46 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Milt99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: West Of California
Posts: 5,176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Liked: 96
Been a long time since I've looked at this forum.
So am I understanding this correctly?
There is a portion of the room ceiling that is touching the joist and you want to cut a narrow slice out of the wall to allow the ceiling to lower thus eliminating the contact.
It seems that you contracted D. Erskine for plans etc., I would definitely contact him before you do anything.

Personally, I think the above methods are fraught with peril and even if successful could end up having a larger impact than what exists now.
I'm assuming that you are concerned with sound transmittal via the contact with the joist and that as designed, you are doing a room-within-a-room build.
I would think that given the wall\ceiling construction that the impact to sound isolation would likely be minor compared to slicing the wall and hoping that somehow it neatly
drops down into place. If fact it may not drop at all and now you have a nice slice in your wall.
Like someone above posted with the wall "sandwich" construction any conventional circular saw blade would get gummed up quickly could seriously affect the quality of the cut and your control of the saw.

Please excuse my post if I am totally misunderstanding the problem.
Again, I would contact Dennis asap before doing anything..

 

It ain't ignorance causes so much trouble; it's folks knowing so much that ain't so

Milt99 is offline  
post #377 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 11:19 AM
AVS Special Member
 
damelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Woodbridge, VA
Posts: 1,746
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 115
Ugh, that sucks. So either his mountings weren't level or the joists werent. In any case, they need to be parellel. You do NOT want to trim the joists themselves, and shaving the OSB would be problematic. I'd personally rip it out and do it again... properly, it just sucks. There aren't really ways to adjust it once it is in place. You can adjust the parts inside but the OSB is connected already, you would have to take it down to make corrections. frown.gif

Or... you could just live with it and accept that you lost some decoupling.
damelon is online now  
post #378 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 12:00 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Nightlord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Southern Sweden
Posts: 1,935
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 382 Post(s)
Liked: 155
Get some speakers in and blast away and listen/measure the results.

Under construction: the Larch theater
Nightlord is online now  
post #379 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 12:19 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post

if i remmember your walls are floating on nails. Anyway to go to the bottom and use a skill saw to take out the nails. Whole wall will drop problem solved.

I wish it were that easy. I have a gap at the top of the walls not the bottom.
235 is offline  
post #380 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 12:57 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milt99 View Post

Been a long time since I've looked at this forum.
So am I understanding this correctly?
There is a portion of the room ceiling that is touching the joist and you want to cut a narrow slice out of the wall to allow the ceiling to lower thus eliminating the contact.
It seems that you contracted D. Erskine for plans etc., I would definitely contact him before you do anything.

Personally, I think the above methods are fraught with peril and even if successful could end up having a larger impact than what exists now.
I'm assuming that you are concerned with sound transmittal via the contact with the joist and that as designed, you are doing a room-within-a-room build.
I would think that given the wall\ceiling construction that the impact to sound isolation would likely be minor compared to slicing the wall and hoping that somehow it neatly
drops down into place. If fact it may not drop at all and now you have a nice slice in your wall.
Like someone above posted with the wall "sandwich" construction any conventional circular saw blade would get gummed up quickly could seriously affect the quality of the cut and your control of the saw.

Please excuse my post if I am totally misunderstanding the problem.
Again, I would contact Dennis asap before doing anything..

You understand the problem correctly. I designed the room myself using sketchup with all details drawn to scale.
You raise an interesting point with green glue gumming up the blade. Has anyone tried cutting through GG that has cured for a month?
As far as the ceiling not dropping back down nicely.....hmmm. The clips were installed such that there is a 3/8" clearance between the ceiling and the joists above. I suspect the ceiling OSB has been under a fair bit of tension around the perimeter from the walls pushing it up. My room is 13' wide but the channel I used is only 12' wide so there is 6" at the ends that are unsupported. This is what allowed the ceiling OSB to be pushed up when the walls were installed. Do you think that once the wall is cut back that the 6" span that has been pushed up 3/8" for a month will want to spring back? I am planning on using an multi-tool with a very thin blade for the 1st cut. If there is no spring back from the ceiling then that thin cut would remain open and I could stop there and caulk it up. If it does spring back then I could make another cut 1/8-1/4" lower to allow more drop. Am I being too optimistic on how this would work? Thanks for your thoughts.

235 is offline  
post #381 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 01:01 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by damelon View Post

Ugh, that sucks. So either his mountings weren't level or the joists werent. In any case, they need to be parellel. You do NOT want to trim the joists themselves, and shaving the OSB would be problematic. I'd personally rip it out and do it again... properly, it just sucks. There aren't really ways to adjust it once it is in place. You can adjust the parts inside but the OSB is connected already, you would have to take it down to make corrections. frown.gif

Or... you could just live with it and accept that you lost some decoupling.
Yup, still having trouble swallowing this one. Everything was mounted parallel, it's just the unsupported ends that curve-up into the joists as I tried to describe in the last post. I am still hopeful that trimming the wall above the top row of screws will allow the perimeter of the ceiling OSB (and attached drywall) to spring back and close the gap.....
235 is offline  
post #382 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 01:03 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
I wish I could do a pre and post test to actually measure the difference. I just ordered my solid door yesterday. I won't be here for another 3-4 weeks.
235 is offline  
post #383 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 01:10 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Michigan, USA
Posts: 8,187
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 35
That was looking so neat and tidy, too...

So what's your current thought on a solution? cut the ceiling or wall?

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #384 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 01:29 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

That was looking so neat and tidy, too...

So what's your current thought on a solution? cut the ceiling or wall?


Everything is so much neater on the computer monitor. I wish I had a CTL-Z for the real world.
I am leaning towards cutting the wall where I don't have access from outside the room.....like this (red lines are where the blade would be run):






I just bought this and getting ready to pull the trigger. Would this cut through cured GG very well?

235 is offline  
post #385 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 01:49 PM
AVS Special Member
 
HopefulFred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 2,934
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 227
Ted just said the best solution. Cut the ceiling. There are no wires behind it. It doesn't matter how far it moves.

You defeat the neat overlapping seams in that corner, but that's the only long-term negative that I see.

You'll need mud and whatnot obviously. Were you going to put anything over it. Moulding or soffit?
HopefulFred is online now  
post #386 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 01:54 PM
Member
 
xjagox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Maryland
Posts: 190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Cutting the ceiling perimeter seems like an ok solution too. Will you have soffits covering those corners anyway? (an opportunity to mitigate the loss of the woven corner).

I think that a horizontal cut through the wall will work poorly. There will be lots of pressure downward on the blade of your cutting tool. I'd imagine it will want to bind up constantly.
xjagox is online now  
post #387 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 02:20 PM - Thread Starter
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Ted just said the best solution. Cut the ceiling. There are no wires behind it. It doesn't matter how far it moves.

You defeat the neat overlapping seams in that corner, but that's the only long-term negative that I see.

You'll need mud and whatnot obviously. Were you going to put anything over it. Moulding or soffit?

I will be covering the entire perimeter with 3/4" MDF soffit so prettiness of the chosen solution doesn't count for anything. I can't visualize how cutting the ceiling will help. Won't the wall still be coupled to the joist above?
235 is offline  
post #388 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 02:21 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Ted White's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Michigan, USA
Posts: 8,187
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by xjagox View Post


I think that a horizontal cut through the wall will work poorly. There will be lots of pressure downward on the blade of your cutting tool. I'd imagine it will want to bind up constantly.

I agree, and also with Fred. The wall cut is likely to jamb that cutting tool. Pretty cool tool, though!

__________________

Ted



The Soundproofing Company
Ted White is offline  
post #389 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 02:47 PM
AVS Special Member
 
HopefulFred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 2,934
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by 235 View Post

Won't the wall still be coupled to the joist above?
well there's the part I didn't consider...
HopefulFred is online now  
post #390 of 580 Old 06-07-2013, 03:33 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 21,526
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 591 Post(s)
Liked: 746
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

Tags
Panasonic Pt Ae7000u 1080p Full Hd Projector
Gear in this thread

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off