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Old 07-09-2013, 06:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Congrats on progress ! Looking good.

Thanks Mfusick,

I will be looking to put together some kind of HTPC so I might need a consultation. At the very least I want to do a server system to set up my own cloud for in home and also on the go if possible. I have been looking at the nas stuff from Synology lately but need to finish the room first. Getting ahead of myself here.
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Old 07-09-2013, 06:42 PM - Thread Starter
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Can Light Trims/Bulbs

The cans were wired up and I put in the trims. Here is what I ended up with.

Front



Rear



Right Side



Left Side
I bought one expensive MR16 bulb at the local store just to verify functioning. The package stated that it was 3000K. I then purchased some cheaper bulbs online that were also 3000K. They do not appear to be the same color temperature. The one on the right is the expensive $7 bulb that looks like warmer light. And the one on the left is the cheaper one that was closer to $1 per bulb with cooler blue light. I need to put the warmer light on the other wall to get a more fair representation but you can probably still see what I am talking about. I am sure this will affect how my fabric appears.



The lights are all 50 watt and I am so far pleased enough with the amount of light they are putting out. They will get very hot of course and I don't plan to have them on full brightness very much but it is good to know I can get a decent amount of light output if I need it. I will have the rope lights going in as well and I am not sure how much they will contribute to the total light output. The fabric I am putting in is pretty dark so I don't expect things to be much brighter than this. A pretty dark room overall but I think I can live with it.
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Old 07-09-2013, 07:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Insteon Switches Partial Installation

I decided to put most of the dimmer switches just outside the room in the double door entryway. I didn't really have a great place to put them and don't think they need to be in the room anyway. The main 8 button switch that has the all on/off function (as well as the dimmer for the main cans) will be inside the room. I plan to put it on the side of the 4 inch panel so it will be mostly hidden but easily accessible.

This is taken from outside the room looking into the double door system.



Here is the 4 dimmer switches inside the entryway. It is just a little box and only 2 of the switches are currently installed. I plan to put shelves in that space for most of the height. I put the switches just above eye height so they will not be seen normally but I can still reach them if I need to.



The blue dangling box is the main 8 button switch on the inside of the room by the entry. As of now I plan to mount it on the side profile of the 4 inch panel that will go within a few inches of the door so it will be in a pretty convenient spot. I am still going over my options.

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Old 07-09-2013, 07:49 PM - Thread Starter
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Questions about door hinges.

Plan is to have 2'' treatments on the doors and the walls. So the panels covering those areas will need to be around 2.25'' thick. I would like to have a flush look to the door with the wall. It would be kind of like a hidden door but the important part aesthetically would be the flush look. However, I would need very large hinges to be able to open the door to 90 degrees. The hinge point would need to be 2.25'' out from the door. My door will start as a 1.75'' solid core with 2 layers of .5'' mdf to make a 2.75'' door.

I largest hinge that I could find for a price I can stomach is here.
http://www.hardwaresource.com/hinges/SPECIALTY+HINGES/Heavy+Duty+Hinges/Heavy+Duty+Door+Hinges/Heavy+Duty+Butt+Hinge%2C+Steel%2C+8%22+x+8%22%2C+Ball+Bearing

It is 8x8. This is what I think that I know......kind of. So each leaf is 4''. After subtracting 2.25'' for the panels we are left with 1.75'' of grab onto the 2.25'' door itself. So does anyone know if that will be adequate? Anybody have more options for the hinges?

I found these "swing clear" hinges but there are two problems. The panels would be interrupted around the hinge. And it brings the door just an inch or two more out than before and I have a step for the riser just where I could open the door to 90 degrees with a normal hinge. So it would not quite open to 90 degrees.

http://www.stanleyhinges.com/Five-Knuckle-Ball-Bearing-Standard-Weight-Full-Mortise-Swing-Clear-Butt-Hinges-items.aspx

Any advice is appreciated.
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Old 07-09-2013, 09:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Fabric frame panel questions.

It was recommended to me in the gpowers fabric frame thread that I build furring strips using possibly 2x2's and then use 3/4'' material of some flavor to make the actual panels giving me close to 2.25'' total. I would probably use velcro to attach the panels to the furring strips. This seems like a good plan. (I would also need to make 6 panels of 4.25'' depth)

The carpenters I am working with to build the panels are interested in making them as easy as possible. This part has already been bid out. Out of respect for them I am at least looking into other ways to do the fabric frames that may save us some time. I will also be working with them on the frames for the duration.

Another idea I had was to use a shorter span of horizontal furring strips on the top and bottom and place them just inside of the fabric frame. So the frames would fit around the furring strips to keep them from bowing in that direction and the weight of the panel would be supported as well. The fabric frames would need to be made deep enough to make it to the wall though. So it would be more material and I am not sure it would even be easier.

I would love to hear peoples thoughts about this and any other ideas about how to construct these panels.
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Old 07-09-2013, 09:41 PM
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I went wit the KISS method and ripped 2x4s for my fabric frames. I (wanted) needed 1" thick frames to match my rigid fiberglass so the frames were ripped to 1" thick and so I ended up with 1 1/2 x 1" lumber. I also had purchased a Kreg pocket jig and used it to assemble the frames . Worked great and didn't take too long. The fiberglass panels were cut to fit snuggly inside the frames (in the appropriate height areas) and I used spray adhesive to attach the 1" thick batting to fill out the top potions. To attach to the wall, my design was a little different than some and I used a 1" thick furring strip at the chair rail height and oak chair rail that was 1/4" hanging over the furring strip on the top and bottom to secure the frames there. The bottom frames where finally secured with base molding and the top will be attached similarly with oak trim. I just haven't done the top yet because I want to EQ the room after the carpet and seats are in to see if I need more or less rigid fiberglass.
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Old 07-09-2013, 09:48 PM
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I've made frames for the 2 inch quest panels for a Erskine design. See Curve Frenzy

First 2x2s are basically made from trash lumber and I wouldn't consider using them for this application. I used premium 2x4s that I ripped to 2+ inches. Attached them directly to the wall. You need to understand that frames of the size in your plans will bow with the fabric tension and either add mid span supports horizontally or slip the frame over furring on the wall that keeps the sides from pulling in.

My lumber of choice would be the 5/4 inch thick Finger Joined pine trim boards. More $
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Old 07-10-2013, 07:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BroncoSport View Post

I went wit the KISS method and ripped 2x4s for my fabric frames. I (wanted) needed 1" thick frames to match my rigid fiberglass so the frames were ripped to 1" thick and so I ended up with 1 1/2 x 1" lumber. I also had purchased a Kreg pocket jig and used it to assemble the frames . Worked great and didn't take too long. The fiberglass panels were cut to fit snuggly inside the frames (in the appropriate height areas) and I used spray adhesive to attach the 1" thick batting to fill out the top potions. To attach to the wall, my design was a little different than some and I used a 1" thick furring strip at the chair rail height and oak chair rail that was 1/4" hanging over the furring strip on the top and bottom to secure the frames there. The bottom frames where finally secured with base molding and the top will be attached similarly with oak trim. I just haven't done the top yet because I want to EQ the room after the carpet and seats are in to see if I need more or less rigid fiberglass.

I will look into the Kreg pocket jig.

I am guessing the frames will not be easily removable since you are waiting on EQ before attaching the rest. What kind of EQ are you going to use.
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Old 07-10-2013, 09:53 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I've made frames for the 2 inch quest panels for a Erskine design. See Curve Frenzy

First 2x2s are basically made from trash lumber and I wouldn't consider using them for this application. I used premium 2x4s that I ripped to 2+ inches. Attached them directly to the wall. You need to understand that frames of the size in your plans will bow with the fabric tension and either add mid span supports horizontally or slip the frame over furring on the wall that keeps the sides from pulling in.

My lumber of choice would be the 5/4 inch thick Finger Joined pine trim boards. More $

Ok so if I want them to be removable then it might be a good idea to use short furring strips and fit the panels over the strips. The strips would prevent bowing and support the weight of the panel. Using this method I don't even see a need to use Velcro as long as there is friction between the furring strips and the panel.

I would think the furring strips could be made of whatever material I happen to have available to rip down? And I would also think that the strips could be minimal in size? How small do you think I can go?

It looks like I should go for the ripped 2x4's since the pine is pretty expensive considering the quantity I will be using.
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Old 07-13-2013, 01:26 PM - Thread Starter
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It doesn't look like there are any ideas about my door questions. Maybe my explanations are confusing. Here is a picture just in case it helps.



I could still use the 8x8 hinge I posted a link to above if need be. This is my first door so please correct me if I am wrong here. It is my understanding that the weight is held by the part of the hinge mortised into the door and the jamb. The screws just hold it in place. If this is true then I have made a mistake by using mdf as my door jamb material because it will not hold as much on the edge as other materials. However, the hinge I linked to above is pretty thick at 0.2''. So it does give me more real estate to put into the wood which can only be a good thing.

In order to fully mortise the hinge into the door even though the door is 2.25'' away from the hinge point I have considered screwing on a 2x4 onto the hinge side of the door so the hinge can be mortised into more material.

Does anyone have any advice on whether or not grabbing approx 1.75'' of my 2.75'' door is enough? Keeping in mind it will be fully mortised (if that is the correct terminology) on both sides? As you can see in the picture I have made my jambs stick out 2'' from the wall so I can mortise into that as well. I have considered putting 2x2's behind the jamb material if I need to for more stability for the jamb.

I don't know how the physics of this work out but I also considered just getting a normal sized heavy duty ball bearing hinge. It would be mortised into my extra long jamb up to 2'' away from the wall. The screws would go into the 2x2's behind the jamb and the 2x2's would be screwed into the framing via long screws that go through the osb and drywall layers. On the door side the hinge would be mortised into the 2x4 that is screwed into the door itself. This situation creates more leverage for the hinge to support. So I don't know if it is a good idea. But it would save some money. The 8x8 hinges are about $45 ea and I have 2 doors. I need 3 hinges for each door so that is 6 hinges.

Anyway, I am getting ready to order some doors and hardware so any advice is great.
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Old 07-13-2013, 01:33 PM
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My understanding is that you can have part of the hinge extend beyond the jamb, and that it not necessarily true that all the weight is carried by the mortise into the wood jamb. I would use the long screws that go through the jamb and into the wall framing behind the jamb. I would question the need for the 2x4 screwed onto the door.

Also, it seems to me that you will only need the hinge pin sticking out 1/2 the thickness of the wall panels, since it will extend the door out twice that far when the door is swung open. (Hard to express in words -- hopefully you get my drift).
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Old 07-13-2013, 01:48 PM - Thread Starter
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Screen and Fabric Ordered!

I placed an order with Techht which is run by avs member getgray. He was great to work with and has a nice discount for avs members for GOM fabric.

Here is what will be coming:

Screen

Screen Excellence EN4K material in a Seymour AV frame with magnetic masking panels. I am getting the 110' wide 2.37:1 version.

Link

http://www.seymourscreenexcellence.com/fixedframes.asp

This fabric measured very well in Jeff Meier's (of Accucal) tests. Jeff was very helpful and knowledgable. Here is a link to this great document.

http://www.accucalhd.com/documents/accucal_front_projection_screen_report.pdf

Fabric

As previously mentioned I will be going with a combination of colors which are more into the gray side of things and which are also rather dark. I am hoping I will be happy with the tradeoff and that the final result will be aesthetically pleasing.

All fabric is GOM

Front wall:

FR701 Black

Side and Rear walls:

Anchorage
Graphite
Fossil
Goose

I have decided to texture and paint the underside of the soffits to make things a little easier (and cheaper) for myself. I am leaning towards the Graphite color for the underside of the soffits which will be quite dark.

There is a pic of the color combo in a previous post.

I am hoping to start the fabric frames next weekend.
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Old 07-13-2013, 01:52 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeBon View Post

My understanding is that you can have part of the hinge extend beyond the jamb, and that it not necessarily true that all the weight is carried by the mortise into the wood jamb. I would use the long screws that go through the jamb and into the wall framing behind the jamb. I would question the need for the 2x4 screwed onto the door.

Ok good to know. Like I said I really don't know what I am doing here.

I was absolutely planning to use long screws that go into the framing as you suggested.
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Old 07-13-2013, 01:55 PM
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Check my edit above about the hinge extension necessary. Just for simplicity, if your door is 2". and you wall panels are 2", then a 3 " hinge should allow the door to swing clear of the wall panels. And when you use the wide hinges, you need to worry about the door swinging clear of the opposite jamb.
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Old 07-13-2013, 02:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeBon View Post

Check my edit above about the hinge extension necessary. Just for simplicity, if your door is 2". and you wall panels are 2", then a 3 " hinge should allow the door to swing clear of the wall panels. And when you use the wide hinges, you need to worry about the door swinging clear of the opposite jamb.

Well, if that is true it will help my cause. I will probably go ahead and place the order for the hardware and see what happens unless something comes to light soon.
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Old 07-13-2013, 02:16 PM - Thread Starter
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Quest Perfsorber panels arrived

I took delivery of 4 2x4 Quest Perfsorber panels from Dennis Erskine.

Shawn Byrne spec'd them in my layout for the first reflection points and here they are.





To my understanding it is a pretty unique product that successfully combines absorption with diffusion. It widens the soundstage in narrow rooms. I think they call them Q Perf. Here is a product page. (previously gave the wrong link, here is the correct one)

http://www.questai.com/downloads/QuestAI%20QPerf%20Brochure.pdf

Here is hoping they can work some magic in my room!
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Old 07-13-2013, 02:26 PM
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Take a look at this:


You definitely need a large hinge. Check page 16 of this pdf.. You want a wide throw hinge because you want to bite into the meat on the door, not the fabric frame affixed to it.

I think you need every bit of an 8" wide hinge. You could do 4-1/2x8 instead of 8x8.

Tim
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Old 07-13-2013, 03:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Tim,

Thanks for the link. Very helpful in determining the hinge size. It looks like I might just make it with an 8'' wide hinge.

Just to clarify: I was thinking about adding a 2x4 to the hinge side of face of the door to extend the surface area that the hinge would be mortised into. I was not going to put the hinge through the fabric frames.

I realize I could do 4 1/2 x 8 but I can't find one that I can afford. The only 8'' wide hinge that I found that I could afford just happened to be 8x8. If you know of one then please share. If I buy the 8x8 then that will be 24'' of hinge showing on a 78'' door!

Thanks,

Grant
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Old 07-13-2013, 03:47 PM
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$27/ea at the site you link to before.. Here.

I also found a Hager hinge here for $43/ea.

I know the Hager hinge will be a quality piece. I don't know about the other.. You could order the $27 hinge and see. The Hager is ball bearing.

Tim
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Old 07-13-2013, 09:42 PM - Thread Starter
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Yeah I saw the other one you linked to before but as you pointed out it is not ball bearing. It was suggested to me to get a ball bearing hinge. Is it necessary?

The Hager is a great find. Hager are basically the hinge experts from what I hear.

The page states that it is "standard weight". I am not sure what that means but I will look into it. It does not specify on Hager's product page either as far as how much weight each hinge will support. I would estimate my door at around 150 lb's. If I have to buy 4 of them then I am better off with the 8x8 hinge. I would rather buy the Hager name for quality purposes of course.

http://www.hagerco.com/products/architectural-hinges/full-mortise/WTBB1279

They do have a heavy weight wide throw hinge that is model number wtbb1199 but it is several hundred bucks.
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Old 07-14-2013, 04:46 AM
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A standard weight ball-bearing 4-1/2" hinge will handle a 150lb door. Non-ball-bearing is good up to 125.

There is some additional info here.

I believe the issue with 8x8 will be the holes are drilled throughout the hinge, so some screws might be in the door and others might be in the fabric frame.

Tim
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Old 07-14-2013, 11:20 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Tim View Post

A standard weight ball-bearing 4-1/2" hinge will handle a 150lb door. Non-ball-bearing is good up to 125.

There is some additional info here.

I believe the issue with 8x8 will be the holes are drilled throughout the hinge, so some screws might be in the door and others might be in the fabric frame.

Tim

I think you are right about the screw placement on the 8x8 hinge. It looks like it goes about halfway into the hinge which means about 2'' therefore that column of screws would just miss my door. If I put the 2x4 onto the face of the door it would make the effective door thickness enough to accommodate all of the screws.

I did find this specification on the $27 hardware source 4 1/2 x 8'' hinge.
http://www.hardwaresource.com/images/products/4.5_WideThrowJPG.jpg
So the screws are no further than an inch away from the end of the hinge which would be ideal. However the product page states that the hinge is for doors of medium weight.........

The Hager link you provided was really helpful. I was going to search for something like that last night to educate myself but had to take care of the kids. That is great info for those of us trying to figure out our thick heavy doors (or maybe I am the only one who didn't know).

Here is an excerpt from that link:
Quote:
There are three dimensions to know in order to determine the
minimum width of the hinge: door thickness, backset, and
clearance required.
1. When figuring the calculations for a wood door and wood
frame, the door is flush with the casing or face of the frame.
When figuring the calculations for a wood or metal door with
a hollow metal frame, the door is inset approximately 1/8”
(3.2 mm).
2. For doors up to 2-1/4” (57 mm) thick, the hinge is set back
1/4” (6.4 mm) from the back face of the door.
3. For doors over 2-1/4” (57 mm) thick, the hinge is set back
3/8” (9.5 mm) from the back face of the door.
Once these dimensions are known, the formula can then be
applied. Take the door thickness, subtract the backset,
multiply by two, and add the clearance required. If the
hinge size is not standard, then go to the next larger hinge
width. If the width of the hinge is greater than the height of
the hinge [example: 4-1/2” x 6” (114 mm x 152 mm)] this is
referred to as a wide throw hinge. This would apply only to
full mortise hinges.

Ok here goes and someone correct me if I am wrong. So for my situation my door is 2 3/4 and my hinge backset is 3/8. I need a clearance of 2 1/4 for my fabric frames.

2 3/4 minus 3/8 equals 2 3/8

2 3/8 times 2 equals 4 3/4

4 3/4 plus 2 1/4 equals 7

So I would need a width of 7''. If this math is correct (and it may not be) then it must mean that the hinge point does not need to be flush with the outside of the panel. I might get the 8'' hinge just to make sure as long as it does not break the bank.

The other interesting thing was looking at the bearings and the frequency requirements.

Excerpt:
Quote:
Minimum Cycle Requirements
Plain Bearing = 350,000
Standard Weight Ball Bearing = 1,500,000
Heavy Weight Ball Bearing = 2,500,000

Judging by this I only need a plain bearing as it relates to frequency. However, Tim stated in a previous post that plain bearings are good for 125 lbs and ball bearings for 150 lbs.

So now I am trying to calculate my door weight more precisely. I don't have my interior doors yet but I am getting ready to order them. I do have the exterior doors and they are 1 3/8 solid core Masonite Safe n Sound interior doors. I weighed them and it came out pretty close to 70 lbs. I don't know what my 1 3/4 slab will weigh. If the extra 3/8'' adds 20 lbs then it will be closer to 90 lbs. I found here http://www.hooddistribution.com/resources/product_weights.html
that 1/2'' mdf is 2.2 lbs per square foot. I have about 18 square feet so that is 40 lbs per sheet. 40 times 2 is 80 lbs that I will be adding to my 1 3/4 slab. We could have a 170 lb door after all is said and done. My fabric frames will add a few pounds too. My math could be obscenely bad here folks so if anyone knows different please correct me.

So does that mean I really do need the ball bearing hinges? There is no mention of weight in the Hager link as it relates to width. It does specify height though. It also talks about number of hinges for sizes of doors. Thanks for being patient with me as I work this out. Almost there!
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:04 AM - Thread Starter
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I spoke with Hager earlier this week and I did clear a few things up. But, the waters are still a little murky. Hager and other hinge manufacturers try to stay away from strict weight guidelines because there are just too many variables and liability issues. Here is what I found so far. These are generic guidelines and it was kind of difficult to get them to even say this much so take it for what it is worth.

-The standard weight ball bearing non wide throw hinge will support a 150 lb door that is 36'' wide.
-The plain bearing version is 125 lbs.
(So basically Mr. Tim was SPOT ON!)
-As expected the weight rating will drop with a wide throw hinge. By how much they would not say. I found this frustrating and called on multiple occasions hoping to get an answer but no dice.

According to the man I spoke with I should not have to place the hinge point even with the fabric frames in order to open the door 90 degrees. This is consistent with my calculations in the above post. I need to verify this again before ordering.

Here is a table for helping to calculate door weights. I don't know how accurate it is.

http://www.hardwaresource.com/hinge-resource-center/hinge-by-function/door-hinges/door-weights-2/

It states that a solid core 2'' door is 5.25 lbs per sq ft. It looks like they are adding 0.75 lbs per sq ft for every 0.25'' the door thickness is increased. So if my door will be 2.75'' I would have a 7.5 lbs per sq ft door. My door is approx 18 sq ft so 18 x 7.5 is 135 lbs. My previous calculations were much more than this so I don't know which one is correct.

I think what I will do is go ahead and order the doors and then weigh them when they get here. Then weigh the 1/2'' mdf and see where I end up. I am hesitant to order the hinges until I do this. I may be forced to order heavy weight hinges. If so then Hager would be out for cost reasons.

I may only be able to add one layer to my door. This is not the end of the world. It would still be a 2 1/4'' door north of 100 lbs with a damping layer and great seals. Not knowing how much the wide throw spec of the hinge is reducing the weight capacity is very frustrating.

One of the things I have going for me is my door is only 32'' wide and Hager's weight ratings are for a 36'' door. Exactly how much weight can be added back for a 32'' door they would not say.
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:14 AM
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I helped hifiaudio2 (I think that's his UID) with his door and the hinges he chose. I think he documented them in the "Tennessean" build thread if that helps. He may have some more details that would help.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:32 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GetGray View Post

I helped hifiaudio2 (I think that's his UID) with his door and the hinges he chose. I think he documented them in the "Tennessean" build thread if that helps. He may have some more details that would help.

Wow, that is a heavy duty DIY door! Here is the link:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1409757/tennessean-cinema-build/60

It looks like he used the same 8x8 heavy duty ball bearing hinges from hardware source that I linked to before. He did not try to do the flush hidden door look with fabric frames like I am going for so that does add a wrinkle.

The poplar frame with 1x4's is a great idea. Now I am worried that my hinges will not hold into the solid core door and thinking about starting from scratch with a total DIY door like he did.


It might actually be a better idea to go with the 8x8 heavy weight hinges and increase my door thickness to accommodate this hinge.........
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Check my edit above about the hinge extension necessary. Just for simplicity, if your door is 2". and you wall panels are 2", then a 3 " hinge should allow the door to swing clear of the wall panels. And when you use the wide hinges, you need to worry about the door swinging clear of the opposite jamb.

Lebon,

What do you mean by swinging clear of the opposite jamb? Do you mean that when the door closes the outside edge could catch on the jamb? I hope that would be true only if I did not use the correct backset from the hinge to the edge of the door. Is that true or did I miss the point? I want to make sure that I understand this before I order the hinges in case the size of the hinge and its placement on the door effects what you are talking about.

It looks like you were correct about the hinge point not needing to be clear of the panels. It makes sense to me now after visualizing it but it escaped me before. I should only need a 7'' hinge for what I want but I need to make sure first and my planned door thickness may change.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:46 AM
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If you are using the big hinges you really need to attach them well, and therein lies the fundamental problem with a normal door. I don't think you have to worry about the ball bearing issue, if you go with the higher rated ones. The majority of the force is pushing down on those bearings and the extended hinge won't change that much.

Anyway, an important followup post I made in that thread repeated here:
Quote:
Originally Posted by GetGray View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

I am between your method of an overlapped poplar frame filled with MDF (drywall in your case) and Green Glue or starting with a solid core slab door and building up the layers from there. Did you go with the drywall because of its higher mass per square foot?
Typical "solid code" flush birch or luan doors have pretty low quality interiors. Best case is low density particle board. Depending on where you are, you can get higher end solid core doors, but it's usually difficult without moving to a commercial fire rated door. Those slabs are listed as having gypsum interiors. But even those doors don't usually have anything more than pine 1x2 frames with some possible extra blocking around the door handle area. By using a high end poplar 1x4 (minimum) frame you end up with a more substantial place to attach hinges for these heavy doors, and you can fill the core with select materials of your choice, including scrap drywall from your project, or MDF. Sheath with MDF, or if it's a decorative door maybe a layer of vernier plywood.

And if you build one like this, you better be sure you have a BEEFY jamb. One that can take the pull on the top hinge ans well as the push in on the bottom hinge. Otherwise in a few months your strike won't line up anymore.
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:26 PM - Thread Starter
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Now you have me questioning my 3/4'' mdf jambs. They are screwed directly into double framing. But still I should have used a harder wood. How worried should I be? If we rip it out and start over it will definitely add to the cost.

One good thing if I go with the heavy duty hinges is that they are 0.2'' thick so it will be recessed into the jambs quite a bit for better hold. I do plan to use extra long screws to go into the framing as much as possible of course.
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Old 07-18-2013, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

What do you mean by swinging clear of the opposite jamb?

The wider the hinge, the wider its swing radius. So when it opens, the door will move toward the opposite jamb by an amount determined by the hinge swing radius. So you need to allow enough clearance so the the opposite edge of the door does not hit the opposite jamb before it swings far enough to clear. So if the door has to swing 5 degrees to clear the opposite jamb, the distance between the edges of the leaves of the hinge will be twice as far for an 8" hinge, as for a 4 " hinge, when the hinge is open 5 degrees.
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Old 07-18-2013, 02:31 PM
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If you have framing that the screws will hit, you will/should be OK. If you planned to screw a heavy door into MDF alone, you are asking for trouble. Problem is usually that especially with double drywall, there isn't much to screw to other than the jamb for the outer row(s) of screws.
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