Drywall finishing for flat black ceiling - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 03:12 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
This might be a stupid question but I've seen answers on both ends of the spectrum in a search of this forum so I'm hoping some folks with experience can chime in.

Depending on the answers to this question, I'm either 95% or 100% done with sanding the drywall in my room. The walls be fabric frames, so no worries there with obtaining perfection on the drywall finish, however, the ceiling has a few places that aren't 100% perfect.

They're probably 95-98% of the way there. Things like small areas where it's a couple millimeters low or high that I'd probably take yet another afternoon to skim, sand, ponder life, skim, sand, regret not hiring it out, etc., etc. if it were the walls in certain areas of the basement, but it's not and I'm seriously stuck in an infinite loop and wondering if I'm wasting my time.

Since the ceiling will ultimately be painted flat mouse ears black, do I really need to do another coat of mud and sand to get it to perfection or is it pointless? In everyone's pictures and comments they all say it's like staring into a black hole, so I'm inclined to think I'm done with drywall sanding. Please God, say I'm done with this terrible, terrible activity.

FWIW, all of my lights will be in the perimeter soffits (none in the ceiling at all) so there will be no direct light on the ceiling other than the rope light in the tray. Thanks!
Unacceptable is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 03:17 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Brad Horstkotte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 5,116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 57
You will always be able to tell where the defects are and obsess about them; noone else will notice.
Brad Horstkotte is offline  
post #3 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 03:21 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
mgkdragn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Illinois, East of St Louis
Posts: 10,503
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked: 543
Flat black drywall is tough tough tough to get perfect .. however, as long as you don't have any direct lighting on the ceiling, and just the dim rope light you've mentioned .. I'd say you'll be OK ..

Yet, as Brad said, you'll still likely obsess .. but you knew that already ..

Oddball: Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?

mgkdragn is online now  
post #4 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 03:23 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Damnit. Not what I wanted to hear! :-)

And then there's the fact that it comes from the guy who's theater I've stolen so much inspiration from. Seriously, I love your build and have used it's thread as a reference the whole time.

Damelon's is the other thread I've relied on so I'm sure he or Big will be next to chime in and tell me the same thing.

Thanks Brad!
Unacceptable is offline  
post #5 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 04:28 PM
Advanced Member
 
longtimelurker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 556
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 12
the more you finish drywall, the more you will notice at other peoples homes, business, etc, that only you are neurotic about it.

rarely is it perfect, and rarely can a trained eye not find the seam crowns (even if they are feathered over 3-4-5-6 feet)....

99.9 percent of people wouldnt notice or even know that seams exist.
longtimelurker is offline  
post #6 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 04:40 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
I truly must be neurotic... thank you interwebs. Because...

Now I'm finding out about "high build" primers that help even things out. Maybe I'll try that and the black paint on the screen wall first to get an idea of what to expect. The screen wall will get covered anyway so no loss other than a little $$$ and at this point, what the hell.

Is anyone using a varnish or similar on the ceiling after paint? I know flat dark paint is notoriously prone to abuse but I doubt I'll have that problem with the ceiling. For some reason, I'm picturing me inadvertently raking a 12 foot piece of timber on the ceiling in the next build phase . Yep, I'm neurotic. Crap.
Unacceptable is offline  
post #7 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 06:09 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,475
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked: 527
the need for a great ceiling finish is partially dependent of the planned lighting, If you are going to have a rope light in cornice molding around the theater it MUST BE PERFECT. A common rookie mistake is too over sand and take too much away from the tapered joints, That result will show with rope light. To test the room put on a coat of dark tinted primer so that the ceiling is one uniform color and hold a single bright bulb near the ceiling. If you can see the joints, add mud sand and re-prime.

If you are just doing down lighting and sconces it needs to be just pretty good.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #8 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 07:44 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

the need for a great ceiling finish is partially dependent of the planned lighting, If you are going to have a rope light in cornice molding around the theater it MUST BE PERFECT. A common rookie mistake is too over sand and take too much away from the tapered joints, That result will show with rope light. To test the room put on a coat of dark tinted primer so that the ceiling is one uniform color and hold a single bright bulb near the ceiling. If you can see the joints, add mud sand and re-prime.

If you are just doing down lighting and sconces it needs to be just pretty good.

Between you and Brad, I'm going to do that extra coat but I'd like to implement this idea of yours. What dark primer would you recommend?
Unacceptable is offline  
post #9 of 35 Old 03-27-2012, 08:02 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,475
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked: 527
Actually drywall and mud should get a drywall primer first, that will normalize the absorption rates of future coats, Ask them to tint it as dark as they are willing.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #10 of 35 Old 03-28-2012, 06:51 AM
AVS Special Member
 
tlogan6797's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 35
The tendency is to overwork the mud. I found that a final, thin (and by thin I mean adding a little water to the mud) skim coat and then very light sanding worked the best. On some of my seams I was able to wet sand it using a slightly damp sponge. Any remaining little pits would be filled with paint.

Tom Logan
Everytime I reply the thread ends
Need motivation? Get LOGANED
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1014847

An as-yet un-named theater designed by Big-WarrenP-BritInVA
tlogan6797 is offline  
post #11 of 35 Old 03-28-2012, 02:21 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
mgkdragn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Illinois, East of St Louis
Posts: 10,503
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked: 543
Of course, there is always the option to texturize the ceiling ..

Oddball: Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?

mgkdragn is online now  
post #12 of 35 Old 03-28-2012, 03:36 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Brad Horstkotte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 5,116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unacceptable View Post

And then there's the fact that it comes from the guy who's theater I've stolen so much inspiration from. Seriously, I love your build and have used it's thread as a reference the whole time.

Thanks!

Mudding and sanding is definitely not a lot of fun - I remember thinking to myself "what am I doing???" when I'd start another coat, but then once you're going, you're all in. I was fortunate though that I hired out most of it, I just added the soffit and had to drywall, tape, mud, and blend that part into the ceiling - but it still sucked.
Brad Horstkotte is offline  
post #13 of 35 Old 03-28-2012, 04:59 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quick update...

I took Big's advice and grabbed some dark primer today and used one of my walls as a test case to see how perfect my finish needed to be. On the seams I considered 99% done, everything covered beautifully. On the ones I felt were 95%.... yeah, more like 80%. They looked terrible.

So I've now added a fifth layer on the ceiling seams and probably will need a sixth on the lower spots. I've always been told "build up really thin layers" but I must be taking it to the extreme and doing them too thin. There's probably a finesse element to it and everything up this point has been shear brute force so I haven't made the transition.
Unacceptable is offline  
post #14 of 35 Old 03-29-2012, 05:52 AM
AVS Special Member
 
tlogan6797's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 35
Again,
Quote:
The tendency is to overwork the mud.

.

Clean your drywall knife (scrape the edges clean on the edge of your container) after each application before picking up the next load. Apply and leave it. If you have any ridges, leave them to dry. You should be able to scrape off the ridges with the drywall knife. THEN lightly sand down the reaming high spots and edges to blend in.

Are you using progressively wider knives for each layer? That helps a lot, too. You don't have to get the most expensive ones, but a decent set is not a bad thing to have around the house for fixing up those little dings when you are painting other rooms.

Tom Logan
Everytime I reply the thread ends
Need motivation? Get LOGANED
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1014847

An as-yet un-named theater designed by Big-WarrenP-BritInVA
tlogan6797 is offline  
post #15 of 35 Old 03-29-2012, 06:26 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,475
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked: 527
You will also see the pros adding water and whipping up the mud with an elecetric paddle. They also never clean their blades off on the top edge of their bucket, they want the mud to be smooth and creamy and don't want to introduce contaminants back in the mix. Get a hand held hopper and use that instead of the bucket for blade scraping and reloading.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #16 of 35 Old 03-29-2012, 06:39 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Yes to both of you. I started with a 3" blade, then a 6" blade and now I'm using a 12" blade. I also use the trough and water the mix down a little to get it a little thinner. Straight out of the bucket is so thick it kills my girlish forearms with that 12" blade.

Took a look at it this morning and it looks much better. I'll probably give it a light pole sanding tonight and see where I'm at. I'm dying to get past the drywall phase and into the fun stuff but don't want to rush it on the ceiling.
Unacceptable is offline  
post #17 of 35 Old 03-29-2012, 07:56 AM
AVS Special Member
 
tlogan6797's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 35
Quote:


Get a hand held hopper and use that instead of the bucket for blade scraping and reloading.

That's what I had in mind by "container." Even the plastic ones have a metal edge for scraping.

Glad it's looking better. I found that there is a knack to the pole sanding, too. I found that raising my arms and sanding with pole as parallel to the ceiling as possible worked much better than using lower arms and the pole at a sharper angle to the ceiling.

Tom Logan
Everytime I reply the thread ends
Need motivation? Get LOGANED
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1014847

An as-yet un-named theater designed by Big-WarrenP-BritInVA
tlogan6797 is offline  
post #18 of 35 Old 03-29-2012, 09:57 AM
Advanced Member
 
advertguy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlogan6797 View Post

I found that there is a knack to the pole sanding, too. I found that raising my arms and sanding with pole as parallel to the ceiling as possible worked much better than using lower arms and the pole at a sharper angle to the ceiling.

Never thought I would say this to you Tom, but thanks for the suggestion! I'm going to be finishing my reno'd living room soon and this tip will hopefully help.
advertguy2 is offline  
post #19 of 35 Old 03-29-2012, 05:36 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Ok...now we're definitely getting somewhere with this. I took a chance on throwing $40 at a Hyde dustless pole sander (which doesn't come with a pole, btw ) and a drywall bag for my Shop Vac off Amazon.

Everything came in today so I headed down to the theater to give it a go and WOW am I impressed. I've been using the stupid hand sander on the walls up to this point and even with my "dust control" compound it makes a terrible mess on the floor (hence why I ordered the dustless sander in the first place) and my arms want to fall off every time.

Not only does this thing get 99% of the dust (seriously) but it does the work with a quarter of the effort of the hand variety.

Tom's dead on, too, with the technique. With this thing sucking itself to the wall it's almost impossible to move it without being virtually parallel to the wall/ceiling at which point you can actually finesses it around with relative ease.

I might finally see paint on the ceiling by the weekend... so sweet!
Unacceptable is offline  
post #20 of 35 Old 03-30-2012, 05:40 AM
AVS Special Member
 
tlogan6797's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 35
Glad to help. I found that the pole technique I used keeps more of the dust off your head, too because you are standing behind the sanding head instead of right under it.

Good luck!

Tom Logan
Everytime I reply the thread ends
Need motivation? Get LOGANED
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1014847

An as-yet un-named theater designed by Big-WarrenP-BritInVA
tlogan6797 is offline  
post #21 of 35 Old 03-30-2012, 06:14 AM
AVS Special Member
 
wkearney99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Bethesda, MD USA
Posts: 1,277
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Horstkotte View Post

You will always be able to tell where the defects are and obsess about them; noone else will notice.

This is why I always pay someone else to drywall and paint. A mistake I make is something I notice every time I'm in the room. I'm stuck with the memory of when it happened and then reinforce it every time I see it. Versus not knowing when a mistake was made and thus not reinforcing the memory of it every time. That and being able to make someone else do the job right or not get paid.
wkearney99 is offline  
post #22 of 35 Old 03-30-2012, 07:34 AM
Senior Member
 
stevegravley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 414
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unacceptable View Post

Ok...now we're definitely getting somewhere with this. I took a chance on throwing $40 at a Hyde dustless pole sander (which doesn't come with a pole, btw ) and a drywall bag for my Shop Vac off Amazon.

Everything came in today so I headed down to the theater to give it a go and WOW am I impressed. I've been using the stupid hand sander on the walls up to this point and even with my "dust control" compound it makes a terrible mess on the floor (hence why I ordered the dustless sander in the first place) and my arms want to fall off every time.

Not only does this thing get 99% of the dust (seriously) but it does the work with a quarter of the effort of the hand variety.

Tom's dead on, too, with the technique. With this thing sucking itself to the wall it's almost impossible to move it without being virtually parallel to the wall/ceiling at which point you can actually finesses it around with relative ease.

I might finally see paint on the ceiling by the weekend... so sweet!

I'm doing drywall sanding in a few weeks. Can you give me links to what you bought? I'd like to get the same thing since it worked really well for you!

My home theater build thread
LEVEL 4: Center for Entertainment
stevegravley is offline  
post #23 of 35 Old 03-30-2012, 11:09 AM
Senior Member
 
stevegravley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 414
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevegravley View Post

I'm doing drywall sanding in a few weeks. Can you give me links to what you bought? I'd like to get the same thing since it worked really well for you!

I'm just going to answer my own question here: The attachement for sanding, and I went to Ridgid's site and found the bag for my dry/wet vac.

My home theater build thread
LEVEL 4: Center for Entertainment
stevegravley is offline  
post #24 of 35 Old 03-30-2012, 03:11 PM
Advanced Member
 
Chris_Holmes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Toronto,Ont
Posts: 589
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
How many static shocks have you got from that thing yet?
That's what I use and it works well -except that with all that dust going through the plastic pipe it does generate static....
And here's my tips for drywalling -take them or leave them
1) round of the end of the drywall knifves a little with a file or sandpaper. I find it helps preventing accidental gouges -especially when doing joints in corners etc
2) Use a hand held trouble light with a 60W bulb and shine it along the wall -not at it. You'll see any little defects better because of the shadows.
3) I find it easier to sand the edges of the seams with a circular motion and prevents the drywall screen from making little channels in the compound....

Home reno pics and Craftsman inspired home theater

http://s205.photobucket.com/albums/b...ome%20Theater/
Chris_Holmes is offline  
post #25 of 35 Old 04-01-2012, 09:44 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Unacceptable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevegravley View Post

I'm just going to answer my own question here: The attachement for sanding, and I went to Ridgid's site and found the bag for my dry/wet vac.

Yep, that's the sander I got. Not sure about the static shock thing mentioned, though, as I didn't have any issues at all. My only slightly negative experience with it was that it will glide along fine if the block is against the wall straight up and down, long-ways, but a couple times I did it sideways and if you don't hold the pole at about a 45 degree angle, the attachment head will bend at the pivot point and slam itself into the sanding area, dinging up the joint. Hopefully that makes sense, otherwise it will when it happens to you the first couple times.

And I paid $26 for it last week and now it's down to $21. It did take a week to get it delivered and there was no Prime option. Good luck!
Unacceptable is offline  
post #26 of 35 Old 04-01-2012, 12:18 PM
Member
 
boundermt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I own a drywall company...

A piece of advice on the ceiling flats. When doing the tapered seams you are looking at a tape coat, a fill coat, and then a feather coat. The feather coat is best done with "topping compound." On a level 4/5 finish, which is what you are looking at on a flat black ceiling, you will want to pull the mud past the normal 6" taper built into the drywall. I use what is called a "flat box" on seams and I'll wipe all of my tapered seams with at least a 10" box with the crown set flat.

To do these by hand once the seam if filled use your 12" knife and pull a loose mixture of topping compound over the entire tapered seam. Once dry, go over the seam with the 12" knife setting it perpendicular to the wall to look for high/low spots. I use this sander, called a "radius 360."



On the dreaded "butt" seams I make my joints in the "field" by using butt splicers which are nothing more than thin OSB ripped to 4". This prevents the natural crowns that always exist in floor joists and trusses from negatively affecting your seam plus it gives you significantly more area to screw to making a stronger joint which leads to less cracking.

When doing your initial tape-coat on the butts make sure you wipe the seam fairly hard and make sure you ALWAYS thin your All Purpose mud when taping. This helps to insure a good bond between the tape and the drywall and keeps the tape bump as small as possible. Avoid using fiberglass mesh tape like the plague. It has it's place - but it's more difficult to work with.

Once your initial tape coat is fairly dry take a 10" knife and make two swipes along each side of the seam meeting in the middle of the tape. Don't worry about covering the tape at this time though and don't over work the mud. Lap marks are to be expected - they sand off very easily once dry but you'll create more problems if you try to work them out with your drywall knife. You are trying to build up the angle on each side of the tape. Once these two "stripes" are dry take a 10" knife and fill the crater in the middle. Let that dry and lightly sand - your butt seam will be flat to the eye with very little sanding.

The above technique is how professionals get flat butt seams using "flat boxes" but you can do it with standard drywall knifes as well.

Many professionals will, when dealing with a level 5 finish, spray the entire wall or ceiling with thinned down drywall mud through a special sprayer almost like paint.

When painting a smooth wall be sure to use proper painting techniques - don't try to eek out that last bit of paint on the roller. This leads to tiger striping which can be seen.

Below is a pic (not mine) which shows lap marks and the proper method to feather out the butt seams. This was done with a flat box but you can achieve similar results with knives...
Notice that the tapered seams extend past the 6" taper...

On edit... I always buy my mud in boxes and mix it with some water in a bucket. This gives you butter smooth mud with no chunks and an even consistency which is important. When you are done working for the day clean the side of the bucket all the way down to the level of the mud (in the bucket) and pour enough water into the bucket to completely cover the mud. This is called a water cap and it eliminates crusty mud from getting into your working mud. When you are ready to work again just pour the water off and re-mix your mud.

There are a ton of pics and videos on the web that show how to finish drywall but you really just have to do it to get it...



Doug
boundermt is offline  
post #27 of 35 Old 05-01-2012, 12:10 PM
Advanced Member
 
advertguy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Just wanted to bring this thread back to say that I tried Tom's method of sanding with the pole parallel to the ceiling (using the attachment linked above with sanding screens). I didn't like it. Found it much more difficult and the screens left all sorts of lines. Went back to using those sanding sponges (red sponge, black grit from the HD paint section). Sure they're messy, but oh well. I hate sanding drywall...
advertguy2 is offline  
post #28 of 35 Old 05-01-2012, 12:21 PM
Advanced Member
 
BroncoSport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 19
I obessed about a perfect flat ceiling and even though it was probably good enough I opted to apply "knock down" texture to my ceiling and sofits. I really like the light knock down and after the flat black went on, it really looks great. Plus, to me, it adds a little visual interest to my ceiling.

PS Knock down is very easy to do as long as you buy the large knock down tool.
BroncoSport is offline  
post #29 of 35 Old 05-01-2012, 01:19 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tlogan6797's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 35
Hmmmm...I didn't use the attachment. Just a broom handle for a pole and the sanding head. That attachment may be sucking the sanding head tighter to the ceiling. I was able to get very light strokes. Just enough to take off the high spots. I used the "dustless" for the final coat and it wasn't too bad of a mess. It tended to fall straight to the floor.

Sorry it didn't work out for you. I'll be trying it again as I have some drywall ceiling work in the kitchen coming up real soon.

Tom Logan
Everytime I reply the thread ends
Need motivation? Get LOGANED
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1014847

An as-yet un-named theater designed by Big-WarrenP-BritInVA
tlogan6797 is offline  
post #30 of 35 Old 05-01-2012, 01:27 PM
Advanced Member
 
advertguy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Unfortunately for me I'll have drywall work in the future as well. I'll try it without the vacuum turned on.

Did you use a sanding screen or actual paper?
advertguy2 is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off