Installing moulding/crown/baseboard over fabric? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 40 Old 04-22-2012, 08:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Ok, trying to understand some basics of installing GoM. Here is the floor plan of the theater followed by a 3D mockup (link to my build/planning thread in my sig):






So the rear wall will be covered with 4" OC703, which in turn will be covered in plastic and then GoM. I like the idea of using fabricmate track for a clean look and for the ease of installation, but I have the following questions:

1) Can I attach 1" fabricmate tracks onto 1" x 3" furring strips (on edge) to achieve the total of 4" thickness needed to cover the OC 703? What would be the best way to attach tracks to furring strips?

2) How would I install the crown moulding and baseboard in such an application? Do I attach another 1"x4" furring strip on edge above the 1"x3"+1" track and then nail the crown onto the 1"x4" strip?

3) Can I glue or attach the moulding for the two false panels on the rear wall directly onto the fabric? Can I glue or attach the chair rail over the fabric seam and directly onto the fabric?

Is there a better way to do what I am thinking?
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post #2 of 40 Old 04-23-2012, 04:32 AM
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You need furring under the fabric where you want to attach any molding. You will not have any success trying to attach anything to the fabric for support over an acoustical treatment. If you want to save money on track you can just staple the fabric to the furring under where the base board and crown will go and hide the staples with the molding. You need to support wide molding with more than one furring strip. For instance the base board will require two. One for the top edge and one for the bottom.
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post #3 of 40 Old 04-23-2012, 09:12 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks! So, the chair rail also needs furring support? And for the two panels at either side of the rear wall, if the moulding is only one inch wide, I should also fur it out and not try to glue it on top of the fabric?
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post #4 of 40 Old 04-23-2012, 01:12 PM
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Don't even think about gluing anything to the fabric. You may not need continuous support some strategically placed stand off spacers may work. Something to nail into. Keep in mind I haven't attempted to mount something of your design.
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post #5 of 40 Old 04-23-2012, 02:53 PM - Thread Starter
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The chair rail will be easy enough to fur out. The moulding/frame is another story. I don't want to have a bunch of seams showing if it can be avoided.

So I was thinking: put 1"x 4" strips where the moulding frames would go, stretch the fabric over those strips to avoid seams, and then nail the frame into the strip (through the fabric). Is that what you mean by spacer bars?
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post #6 of 40 Old 04-24-2012, 07:07 PM
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My theaters walls are very much like yours. And the finished product, if done well, looks so tight and profesional. Furring strips need to also be placed under where your "picture frame" moulding is going to go. Do not attempt to glue anything to the GOM. I used a lot of staples and glue to get the furring onto the wall. Like Big Mouth said, putting two strips at the baseboard, the chair rail and the top where I planed on larger crown moulding under my sofit. Then, for each section of wall between columns, I attached only one verticle furring strip to the wall. You should allow the glue on all these strips to dry. You are going to stretch this stuff pretty tight and I was worried the strips might pull off the wall. Have some patience. The other verticle strip I would attach to the frabric first useing alot of staples. Then I glued and stapled this strip to the wall turning the stapled side to the wall, pinning the frabric against the wall. Allow this glue to dry also. When all the glue has dried, pull the frabric towards and past the first verticle strip and keeping it tight, you staple it to the side of the strip so you will not see any staples from the front. Thease should be hidden by your columns. By the way, this method only works if you do your columns after your fabric, so plan accordingly. After you stretch and attach your fabric from side to side, you can now do top to bottom easily by simply stapling it to the strips you put up before. I started on the top and pulled tight to the chair rail. And then went from the baseboards up to the chair rail. I know this may be confusing so I'm getting some pics together to help illustrate.

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post #7 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 04:19 AM - Thread Starter
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dkroom, thanks for the info! I look forward to seeing the pics. For some reason, I find this to be one of the most intimidating aspects.
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post #8 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 04:31 AM
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Working with fabric was intimidating for me years ago I found another local member who was almost done with his fabric who let me come over for a tutorial. There are lots of tricks that you learn along the way about hiding staples. One is to attach fabric to a furring strip off wall then twist it and attach to the wall, the result is hidden staples on at least that one edge. You can make fast work of securing the furring with liquid nails and two inch wide crown construction staples, remember to leave room for the fabric when mounting things next to a yet to be secured strip.
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post #9 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 06:38 PM
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What Big said about attaching the fabric to the strp and then twisting it towards the wall is exactly what I was talking about in the part about pinning the fabric against the wall. It is hard to get at first but once you do it is actually quite easy.

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post #10 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 07:14 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkroom View Post

What Big said about attaching the fabric to the strp and then twisting it towards the wall is exactly what I was talking about in the part about pinning the fabric against the wall. It is hard to get at first but once you do it is actually quite easy.

Easy for you to say! I really envy you guys who have skill! I've reread your post several times and I understand what you're saying a little more each time. Can't wait to see some pics!
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post #11 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 07:18 PM
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In this very busy picture you see one of my walls with most of the furring strips already in place. The blue arrows point to chair rail, baseboard and one set of verticle strips. The black arrows point to where the crown furring strips will go (there just not there yet in this pic). The pink arrows are where the strips will go that have the material already attached to them. The orange squiggle line is showing the framing for the collumn that at this point in the build has not been secured in place but in this pic it is just standing in its future spot. After attaching the strips with the material ( pink arrows), you pull the fabric across over to the strips where the collumn is at and then (with the column out of the way), you staple the material to the side of those stips.

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post #12 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 07:37 PM
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In this pic of the same wall, you can see the upper furring strips in place as well as the strips I placed for the backing of the "picture framing" moulding that will ride on top of the material. Note; it is important that the "picture frame" backing be exactly where you plan on placing the moulding later, otherwise you would have to undo alot of work to change this. Also I did not attach the material to this backing in any way. I let the "framing" pin the material down when I attached it later on. You'll notice that I also framed around a couple of electrical outlets. I did this so the plate that goes here later did not push the fabric in. I'm very glad I did that.

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post #13 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 07:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Now, one difference with my build is that I'm going to cover 4" thick OC703. So my furring strips are going to have to be 1" by 4" on edge. Is it ok to screw these furring strips into the drywall? How would I secure the horizontal strips onto the drywall -- will liquid nails be enough to hold them?
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post #14 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 07:47 PM
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I'm not too sure about that. I filled the space between strips with 1" batting above ear height and lineaccoustic below, so my stips only had to be 1" thick and therefore much easier to glue and staple to the wall. I am sure you will come up with something or someone will.

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post #15 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 07:53 PM
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Here is another wall and you can see I painted the strips to closely match the GOM incase after stretching it the light colored wood might show through.


But then why diddn"t I tint or dye the batting? I don't know.

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post #16 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 07:58 PM
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Now that I think of it small L-brackets might work to attach your strips, if I am pictureing this correctly.

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post #17 of 40 Old 04-25-2012, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rs691919 View Post

Now, one difference with my build is that I'm going to cover 4" thick OC703. So my furring strips are going to have to be 1" by 4" on edge. Is it ok to screw these furring strips into the drywall? How would I secure the horizontal strips onto the drywall -- will liquid nails be enough to hold them?

Pocket hole screws would be perfect. Any jig system and self tapped screws will give you all the stability you need.

I'd just get the kreg kit if it were me. They are cheap and work well for this type of work. There are other kits that would be better for furniture building but these joints dont have to be perfect even though I figured out a way to make the kreg system work perfect for furniture grade joints. You'll need a box of screws, the clamp style jig, and a couple pieces of wood to make a jig to actually work with. Very easy and if need help I'd send you some pics of how to set it up for fast drilling with few pieces of wood. But you wont have too aweful much to drill and screw so may not need any helpful setup.

Lowes carries a few different kits and the screws. Saw them there after ordering mine online.
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post #18 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 10:55 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by audiovideoholic View Post

Pocket hole screws would be perfect. Any jig system and self tapped screws will give you all the stability you need.

I'd just get the kreg kit if it were me. They are cheap and work well for this type of work. There are other kits that would be better for furniture building but these joints dont have to be perfect even though I figured out a way to make the kreg system work perfect for furniture grade joints. You'll need a box of screws, the clamp style jig, and a couple pieces of wood to make a jig to actually work with. Very easy and if need help I'd send you some pics of how to set it up for fast drilling with few pieces of wood. But you wont have too aweful much to drill and screw so may not need any helpful setup.

Lowes carries a few different kits and the screws. Saw them there after ordering mine online.

Hoboy, now you're speaking in tongues! I'll be meeting with my contractor this weekend, I'll run it by him and see if he understands how to make it work.
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post #19 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 11:31 AM
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Watch a youtube video of kreg pocket hole jig or system. It will show up in searches. Very easy to use little tool! You'll understand as soon as you see it work, trust me!
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post #20 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 11:57 AM
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Pocket screws? good product for other applications. Positioning and holding the jig is too time consuming. If you need four inches of furring just use two layers of two inch furring, Screw and glue up the first and then screw and glue the second to the first.
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post #21 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 12:17 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Pocket screws? good product for other applications. Positioning and holding the jig is too time consuming. If you need four inches of furring just use two layers of two inch furring, Screw and glue up the first and then screw and glue the second to the first.

Even for the ones where the 1" face has to be attached to the drywall?
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post #22 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 12:26 PM
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On the Bacon Race I cut 2 inch pieces from a 2x material and put the 1 1/2 against the wall. No problem. Then we added 2 inch thick fabric panels made off wall. In your case 1 inch may be tough I would try for 1 1/2 and that will speed up your construction as you are just ripping off the shelf 2x.
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post #23 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Pocket screws? good product for other applications. Positioning and holding the jig is too time consuming. If you need four inches of furring just use two layers of two inch furring, Screw and glue up the first and then screw and glue the second to the first.

I'm gonna disagree on that one Big (maybe the first time ) Takes about 30 seconds per hole and would use less wood too. But if the $50-60 for the jig is an issue then yeah rip, glue, screw, and rip, glue and screw again. But I only say this because he says wants to use 1x4s if the 1" doesnt matter then sure rip some 2x2s.
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post #24 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 06:19 PM
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I'm not feeling love for attaching a 4x1 on the sort edge to the wall with screws at an angle. I feel better about 1 1/2 inch wide strips secured with screws perpendicular. Yes, I own a pocket screw jig, I've also broken more bits than I want to admit.
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post #25 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 07:01 PM
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Just a few more pics. Some right when the cloth went on and a couple almost finished.





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post #26 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 08:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I'm not feeling love for attaching a 4x1 on the sort edge to the wall with screws at an angle. I feel better about 1 1/2 inch wide strips secured with screws perpendicular. Yes, I own a pocket screw jig, I've also broken more bits than I want to admit.

Big, I don't think I understood your method initially but now I get it. I will run this and avholic's idea by the contractor and see what he thinks.
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post #27 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 08:28 PM - Thread Starter
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dkroom, thanks for the pics. They really help me visualize it. What color fabric is that, btw?
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post #28 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 09:39 PM
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Heres what it looks like



You would have the wood turned the other way. I have it mounted to a small piece of ply and use a 2x4 on each side of it as a jig to keep the wood level way all you need to do is slide it to the next mark to drill (in your case OC of the stud spacing). There is a clamp on the other side of the wood sticking up in the air that holds the wood in place while drilling the holes. Oh and note the shop vac hooked up to it as it is extremely messy. I wouldnt attempt to use it without a vac hooked up.

IDK how in the world Big has broken the bits. I have drilled literally thousands of pockets without a single problem with the same two bits that came with my kit.

You really need to ask yourself if using the 1x4s are necassary though. If you can get away with the extra wood surface inside of the panels then the 2x2 will most def be stronger than the 3/4" end of a 1x4. But if you are needing 1x4s and would have them butted up against each other or something else then the only other way to put a 1x4 up that way would be with L brackets. You could even add some of them to the pocket holes and they wouldnt take away any space for whatever material will be on the inside.
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post #29 of 40 Old 04-26-2012, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
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Just a few more pics. Some right when the cloth went on and a couple almost finished.





That fabric and wood work is really nice! I just cant see myself making my theater look so nice since I want black everywhere or really close to black. I'm gonna attempt fabric later once everything else is done and can just do it in small sections at a time. Gonna go with black and dark dark grey lol. Black carpet is going down sometime before the 8th as that was all I was guaranteed.
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post #30 of 40 Old 04-27-2012, 03:58 AM - Thread Starter
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You really need to ask yourself if using the 1x4s are necassary though. If you can get away with the extra wood surface inside of the panels then the 2x2 will most def be stronger than the 3/4" end of a 1x4. But if you are needing 1x4s and would have them butted up against each other or something else then the only other way to put a 1x4 up that way would be with L brackets. You could even add some of them to the pocket holes and they wouldnt take away any space for whatever material will be on the inside.

I don't know why I though 1" x 4" was necessary. Got tunnel vision there for a bit! I think 2 x 2 will be the way to go.
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