Time to buy some tools, I think - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 01:23 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
colleycol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Seattle Area
Posts: 422
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Guys,

I am going to conquer my fears and try to DIY my riser and stage construction using the knowledge here.

Only thing is I don't have any idea what the most efficient tools would be. I want to keep the costs down so please keep that in mind.

What tools should I invest in for these projects?

Also, are Harbor Freight tools really that bad? :-)

_________________________________________________
My Gear:
JVC RS4810, Prismasonic HD6000M anamorphic lens, Screen Excellence 4K 115 inch wide
Lumagen Radiance 2021
Onkyo 818, Emotiva Amp
B&W CT700 Series Speakers, (2) PowerSound Audio XS30s
Custom HTPC running Mediabrowser, 12TB Server for storage
...
colleycol is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 01:34 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
programmergeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: summit, nj
Posts: 1,047
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Don't need much a miter saw, or you can use a saws all. framing hammer and nales and a circular saw to cut the plywood. If you plan to carpet it you will need a stapler and carpet tape and a razer. I would avoid Harbor freight like the plage for the power tools, the hammer and knives it is a good resource. Goto the local home store and see what they recomend that is cheap. Last inexpensive miter saw I bought was a dewalt and it is still going but there mighet be something cheaper.

Jason
Note: Any posts are of my personal opinions and not to reflect upon any business.

Jason@programmergeek.com

908 578-6466

programmergeek is offline  
post #3 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 02:12 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Spaceman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Houston
Posts: 1,964
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 96
You could probably do without the miter saw and get by with just a circular saw to cut both your framing members and plywood. If you aren't real handy with a hammer (like me), use a drill with a screw bit to secure everything with deck screws. I don't have a router, so I also used the circular saw to chamfer the front lip of the plywood (where your carpet will wrap).
Spaceman is offline  
post #4 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 03:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 7,816
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 133 Post(s)
Liked: 353
Or use this as the perfect excuse *to* buy some tools like a mitre saw! biggrin.gif It's why I've got a Sawzall now!

And yes, use screws - easier for us non-trade-skilled guys and also avoids potential squeeks...

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht

jautor is offline  
post #5 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 03:37 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
AV Science Sales 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: A beautiful view of a lake
Posts: 7,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 234 Post(s)
Liked: 385
Depending on the shape of your front stage, the only power tool that you would have to have is a circular saw. I would get one that is no less than 13 amp. You do not have to screw the decking down to avoid squeaks. Just apply some Liquid nails glue to the top of the joists right before placing the plywood, then nail. Remember measure twice, cut once. Good rule to follow for newbies or if you are working with expensive stuff like crown molding. Have fun. smile.gif

Mike Garrett, AV Science Sales Call Me: 585-671-2968
Email Me: Mike@AVScience.com
Brands we sell: http://avscience.com/brands/ 
Call for B-stock projectors
Stewart, Seymour, SE, SI & many more.
Klipsch, RBH, Martin Logan, Triad, Atlantic Technology, MK Sound, BG Radia, SVS & Def Tech.
AV Science Sales 5 is offline  
post #6 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 04:59 PM
Senior Member
 
calimark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
if doing mouldings- get a mitre saw- get dual bevel compound if you ever think you will do crown. I bought a hitachi 12" refurb for 199.
Table saw- picked up a lowes turkey day special for $69- it wont last a lifetime but it got the job done and still works.
Jig saw- picked up a display model <$100 after discount.
Circle saw
Framing Nailer craigslist $100 with 1000 nails.
FInish Nailer
Staple Gun

I do own a few harbor freight tools- some are very good and others are crap! I'd stay away from their electric tools.
HF Air tools I dont have a problem with them- have owned a few for a # of years, no issues.
calimark is offline  
post #7 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 05:00 PM
AVS Special Member
 
petew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
Posts: 2,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Please don't buy cheap tools. You can buy a $30 dollar saw at walmart or HD that might get you through the project. If it breaks you can waste a couple of hours exchanging it in the hopes that #2 will get your project done. A $50 saw most likely won't break. But it'll be hard to adjust. It will be noisy. It will have a cheap cord. It might last a few years. A $90 saw will last for the rest of your life.

High Desert Theater - work in progress
Building Bass - Subs

Surrounds - Easy as Pi

Storage - unRAID unDELL

petew is offline  
post #8 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 05:12 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,708
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked: 580
I have all the tools and the best tool for cutting plywood for the decking is the guy in the orange apron at home depot. When working at client sites I plan how the stage and riser are going to be covered and get the guy at HD to rip and cut the plywood/OSB on the panel saw for an exact fit. It is a real time and finger saver. I then bring it in from my pickup and install. If you are making a 7 ft deep riser buy 8ft framing lumber and have them cut a foot + 3inches off each board. Slap a board on the front and back (also cut at HD) and you are done. I usually cut my own framing lumber because I can do it quicker but there is no reason if you have the time, first cut is usually free. Being your own tape and a marker. Measure each piece as it is cut and if he screws up don't buy it.

Word of caution, if you have to go on the weekend go early on Sunday morning. Never go 6-9 am on a weekday.
jautor likes this.
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #9 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 05:32 PM
AVS Special Member
 
aaustin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 1,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
There's some awesome tips in this thread!

I'll add that if you will be driving a lot of screws then an impact driver may be a better option than a power drill. I'll never regret purchasing mine as it makes putting in 3" deck screws a breeze.

The Austin Home Theater:
A DIY high school project (now complete and being enjoyed everyday)

aaustin is offline  
post #10 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 05:40 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,708
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked: 580
Home depot is selling a Rigid 18v drill and impact driver set for $179, I always use star drive deck screws and the impact driver. So easy you will laugh the first time you try it.
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #11 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 05:48 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,708
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked: 580
Stage and riser to go, three carts. The sand was delivered separately.

DSCF5144.jpg

it fits

DSCF5145.jpg

click Bacon Race in my signature for the final product.
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #12 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 05:53 PM
AVS Special Member
 
petew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
Posts: 2,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Big, isn't that the stage kit where they even provided pre-bent plywood?

High Desert Theater - work in progress
Building Bass - Subs

Surrounds - Easy as Pi

Storage - unRAID unDELL

petew is offline  
post #13 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 06:38 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Elill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1,436
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I have all the tools and the best tool for cutting plywood for the decking is the guy in the orange apron at home depot.

Not in this country, they're always out by ~2-3mm at Bunnings (the equivalent shop in Oz)

I'm a beleiver in buying the best tools you can afford, assuming you're going to use them again. I like Festool, but if not Makita who make a great track saw, as good drop saws (the Japanese made line) and really good cordless gear (batteries are nearly as good as Panasonic (who make the best) but fit into a lot more tools)

Bosch make the best Jigsaw on the marke (they invented it)

Cheap tools can be dangerous (under powered, less torque) are often less accurate and difficult to maintain accuracy once calibrated.

Get yourself a good impact driver and cordless drill - you'll not beleive how you got through life without them once you own them

IMHO if you're not going to use them again for other jobs, then I'd hire a contractor and forget about it.

Oh one other thing - nail guns are dangerous, I've never used a cheap one but I'd google around for ones that might jam easily

Peter the Greek

Downunder Theatre MkII
Redefining snail pace construction
"what is worth knowing is difficult to learn"

Elill is offline  
post #14 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 07:19 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,708
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked: 580
Quote:
Originally Posted by petew View Post

Big, isn't that the stage kit where they even provided pre-bent plywood?
As we used to say in Minnesota, ya-betcha

You wouldn't believe that I actually had people seriously ask me what else they could use because they couldn't find the pre-bent variety.
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #15 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 07:42 PM
Advanced Member
 
Jon_B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Land of the Shining Mountains, US
Posts: 622
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by colleycol View Post

=
Also, are Harbor Freight tools really that bad? :-)

I was given a Harbor Freight drill/driver as a birthday present. Chicago brand I believe. The battery life on that thing is amazing. Compared to my hitachi impact driver, the battery last longer and does not seem to discharge when I don't use it. The down side is that it doesn't seem to have much power (torque). Long story short would I buy or have someone buy me another Harbor Freight tool?.....thanks but no thanks.
Jon_B is online now  
post #16 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 07:54 PM
AVS Special Member
 
petew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
Posts: 2,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

...they couldn't find the pre-bent variety.

I'll bet the orange apron guys are still laughing about that question.

High Desert Theater - work in progress
Building Bass - Subs

Surrounds - Easy as Pi

Storage - unRAID unDELL

petew is offline  
post #17 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 08:11 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
colleycol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Seattle Area
Posts: 422
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks guys!!

This is starting to feel a little overwhelming for a desk jockey like myself, lol!!

Looks like a good drill and saws-all tops the list.

_________________________________________________
My Gear:
JVC RS4810, Prismasonic HD6000M anamorphic lens, Screen Excellence 4K 115 inch wide
Lumagen Radiance 2021
Onkyo 818, Emotiva Amp
B&W CT700 Series Speakers, (2) PowerSound Audio XS30s
Custom HTPC running Mediabrowser, 12TB Server for storage
...
colleycol is offline  
post #18 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 08:11 PM
Advanced Member
 
longtimelurker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon_B View Post

I was given a Harbor Freight drill/driver as a birthday present. Chicago brand I believe. The battery life on that thing is amazing. Compared to my hitachi impact driver, the battery last longer and does not seem to discharge when I don't use it. The down side is that it doesn't seem to have much power (torque). Long story short would I buy or have someone buy me another Harbor Freight tool?.....thanks but no thanks.

hmm.....there must be a clue here somewhere....hmmm
longtimelurker is offline  
post #19 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 08:26 PM
Advanced Member
 
Jon_B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Land of the Shining Mountains, US
Posts: 622
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Jon_B is online now  
post #20 of 45 Old 06-14-2012, 08:28 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Spaceman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Houston
Posts: 1,964
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by colleycol View Post

Thanks guys!!
This is starting to feel a little overwhelming for a desk jockey like myself, lol!!
Looks like a good drill and saws-all tops the list.

If we are still just talking about riser & stage construction, I would move a circular saw up the list and a Sawzall down the list. And like you said, a good drill or impact driver should be at the top as well.
Spaceman is offline  
post #21 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 07:09 AM
Advanced Member
 
advertguy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Sawzall (recipricating saw) are only really good for demolition type work or something that requires little to no accuracy. Circular saw and drill are your basic power tools. Impact drivers are nice, but not necessary. My cordless drill drives screws just as easily (Ridgid). The only problem is that the drill is heavier and not balanced as nicely. Much quieter though. A good hammer is a must. I stay away from the ones that have the head and handle made from different materials. Sooner or later they loosen. A good utility knife, measuring tape, framing square and 2 and 4 foot levels are also ideal. Those few simple tools will go a long way.
advertguy2 is offline  
post #22 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 08:37 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,708
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked: 580
Quote:
Originally Posted by advertguy2 View Post

Impact drivers are nice, but not necessary. My cordless drill drives screws just as easily (Ridgid).

Then I suspect you've never screwed 3 1/2 inch deck screws with a quality impact driver because there is a HUGE difference,
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #23 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 08:49 AM
Advanced Member
 
BroncoSport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 20
*admitted tool junkie and accomplished woodworker

There are a few tools that I wouldn't want to be without while doing my HT construction (or a lot of other construction):

DeWalt 18v Drill
DeWalt 18v Driver (SCREWS! I don't have a single framing nail anywhere in the theater room. A good driver is invaluable)
Dewalt 18v mini circular saw (with a good sharp blade, this dude will cut very well. I cut out ALL of the components of my 8 columns with it and it worked well.)
(They all take the same charger and the batteries interchange)
Tablesaw. I have the big one in the wood shop but in the basement is a used portable. I snatched it off craigslist for $100 and that is a lot better than up and down the stairs all the time.
Kreg pocket hole jig kit. Simply the easiest and fasted joining method around. I started with the cheap single hole one and immediately ordered the large kit for the large bench jig. LOVE IT
Fein Multimaster. Forget jigsaws and sawzalls. This tool is unbelievably awesome. For example, I cut 9 recepicle box holes through 2x6's on my riser in less than an hour and they were straight!
(this tool is expensive at $250, but since I started using it, I wouldn't want to be without it)
Framing square, 2' and 4' level, utility knife, hammer
Speed square
Power miter saw. I use a el cheapo Ryobi for framing lumber. Cost me $99 a long time ago and it works pretty good for basic cuts. The $500 Hitachi Compound miter saw in the shop is A LOT better, but again...its up the stairs and in the shop!
Small compressor, upholstry stapler, brad gun (for wood trim)


There are a multitude of other specialty tools that I own and use but I didn't buy them just for the HT, I just have the fortune of using them. (for example a plywood edge bander)

Used or reconditioned tools can save you a ton. I have bought a lot of recon/used tools from eBay and craiglist.
BroncoSport is offline  
post #24 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 08:51 AM
Advanced Member
 
BroncoSport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Then I suspect you've never screwed 3 1/2 inch deck screws with a quality impact driver because there is a HUGE difference,

Amen to that! My DeWalt driver will pull lag bolts into a 4x4 deck post, super quickly! (and snap off the heads if you aren't carefull) smile.gif
BroncoSport is offline  
post #25 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 09:31 AM
AVS Special Member
 
NickTheGreat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Posts: 1,648
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Liked: 82
I really think a miter saw would be worth it for something like this. Circ saws and sawzalls are nice and all, but if you're cutting much to length, the miter saw would be so much easier (and more accurate) that it'd make you mad eek.gif
NickTheGreat is offline  
post #26 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 10:19 AM
Senior Member
 
macfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Fenton, Michigan
Posts: 232
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 29
I agree. I bought a Ryobi 18v battery powered miter saw a long time ago. The thing is indestructible and keeps on going. It is pretty handy not to have to run a power cord and the miter saw has plenty of power. I pretty much have the entire line of Ryobi power tools. They again are pretty much indestructible. I have dropped them several time off of a 6 foot step ladder on to concrete without any problems. A lot of the contractors have gone to using Ryobi in Michigan. Even if you have to replace the tool, you can do it almost 3 times and come out ahead of what you would pay for a major brand name. I have driven lag bolts all day long with both the Ryobi drill and impact driver and have drilled all kinds of holes for running wiring. Also, the drill works great with a hole saw or mixing paint. I know there are people who put the Ryobi brand down but this is the same company that makes Rigid and Milwaukee. BTW, they are on sale at the big orange this weekend. I first bought Ryobi when I went to replace the batteries for my Dewalt drill and found out I could buy the whole Ryobi starter set for the price of one Dewalt replacement battery. I am not going to pay that kind of price for a fancy Black and Decker battery for a drill that has plastic gears inside and is known for transmission problems.
macfan is offline  
post #27 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 10:24 AM
AVS Special Member
 
aaustin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 1,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroncoSport View Post

Amen to that! My DeWalt driver will pull lag bolts into a 4x4 deck post, super quickly! (and snap off the heads if you aren't carefull) smile.gif

No need to countersink screws with the impact! I swear that mine will send the screw all the way through the board if you keep going. biggrin.gif

The Austin Home Theater:
A DIY high school project (now complete and being enjoyed everyday)

aaustin is offline  
post #28 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 10:27 AM
Advanced Member
 
advertguy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Then I suspect you've never screwed 3 1/2 inch deck screws with a quality impact driver because there is a HUGE difference,

Au contraire Monsieur Grande.... cool.gif I've driven thousands of 3" screws (I assume deck screws are the same as construction screws etc...) with my impact when sistering joists, installing subfloor, walls etc... When I switch to my drill, it's pretty much just as effortless, but without the noise. I'm just saying that an impact driver isn't "necessary" if you have a good cordless drill. Better to get another tool in the mean time. If I had to choose between a cordless drill and a driver or a cordless drill and a circ. saw, I'd go drill and saw. Good quality basics is all I'm saying.
advertguy2 is offline  
post #29 of 45 Old 06-15-2012, 07:35 PM
AVS Special Member
 
J_P_A's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: L.A. - Lower Alabama
Posts: 4,116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 244 Post(s)
Liked: 254
I actually bought that Ridgid combo pack yesterday. My 10 year old Dewalt drill doesn't seem to make it as long between charges, and I've got a few projects coming up (yeah, I'm trying to convince myself, not you guys rolleyes.gif). I tried out the impact driver, and it is nice. It's also louder than I expected, but I use ear plugs most of the time anyway. I can see where it will be really nice for driving screws at odd angles where you can't really get behind it, or driving screws into hard lumber.

However, now that I've got one, I'll second what advertguy2 said. If you've already got a cordless drill, you're probably better off putting your money into another tool. If you don't have a cordless, I'd spend the extra $50 or so and get the combo pack with the drill and the impact driver. It's hard to argue with a cordless being at the top of the list of must haves, and the impact driver is a nice bonus!

Dude, are you made of leprechauns? Cause that was awesome!

The Plains Theater Has Begun
J_P_A is offline  
post #30 of 45 Old 06-16-2012, 12:05 AM
AVS Special Member
 
olyteddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,278
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat View Post

I really think a miter saw would be worth it for something like this. Circ saws and sawzalls are nice and all, but if you're cutting much to length, the miter saw would be so much easier (and more accurate) that it'd make you mad eek.gif
Easier? Perhaps. More accurate? That depends on who's putting the 'Skil' in Skil Saw...I can cut 45s and 90s all day with my 6.5" DeWalt Cordless and a speed square for a guide. wink.gif
olyteddy is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off