Tips for painting a white drop down ceiling black - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 06-22-2012, 06:44 PM - Thread Starter
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My HT room has a white drop down ceiling (T frame with tiles). I'm thinking about painting it flat black. It's a dedicated room with 100% light control.

What's the best way to do this? Would it be stupid to use my HPLV sprayer and just spray it flat black and then worry about some places that may not have covered? Would that even work well with the sprayer pointing straight up?

Or, is it recommended I take out each tile and spray them individually. This would mean I'n need to roll or brush the T frame --- but I'm doubtful that would turn out "smooth".

Any and all thoughts are appreciated!

... Altan
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post #2 of 8 Old 06-22-2012, 08:44 PM
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Never did ceiling tiles but I would use a roller. I have painted lots of things black and the really nice thing about black it is covers REALLY good!
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post #3 of 8 Old 06-23-2012, 10:53 PM
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I took ours down and painted them with a brush. If you use a roller, you need to brush the sides and any grooves anyway. Make sure to prime them first because they soak up paint like a sponge. Even with the primer, I needed to do 2 coats. And use a flat finish. I used Behr paint with a flat enamel finish from Home Depot.
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post #4 of 8 Old 06-24-2012, 07:53 AM
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I belive some companys recomend painting both sides so they dont sag/warp

been working for awhile and still to shy to post my own build thread
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post #5 of 8 Old 06-24-2012, 08:07 AM
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I had this dilemma when building my theater a few years ago. I was trying to select ceiling tiles and started off with just some samples and small amounts of paint. I ran into all the aforementioned problems:

1. Consumes an awful lot of paint ($$) and still there are white speckles in the pits of the acoustically formed surface.

2. Takes a lot of time to work the paint into the pits. While I could start with a roller, I would need a brush to get into all the pits and grooves.

3. Probably changes the acoustical properties of the tile given the now smooth layer of paint on the formerly rough surface.

4. The tile warped. (I didn't think of painting both sides which would at any rate cost more).

I eventually chose hardboard (Masonite) instead of tiles. Panels of appropriate size could be cut and then be painted easily prior to installation. A simple paint roller job. I guessed at the time that by the time an acoustical panel was painted to cover all the white, the acoustical properties would be almost the same as a flat panel.

Because there wasn't enough headroom in the basement for a full suspended ceiling with grid, I omitted the grid and screwed the panels directly to the joists (actually set off with small blocks to clear pipes that were clamped directly to the joists.).

.

Remember when lines and logos burned the TV screen? I was at a concert where a musical selection made extremely heavy use of about four of the keys of the piano.
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post #6 of 8 Old 06-24-2012, 12:13 PM
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quickly scuff the frames in place, and spray paint black.

buy new black tiles. you will save hundreds in labor.
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post #7 of 8 Old 06-26-2012, 06:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by longtimelurker View Post

quickly scuff the frames in place, and spray paint black.
buy new black tiles. you will save hundreds in labor.

^^^This is what I did. Except I painted the grids with a brush, 1 coat. Make sure you scuff the grids. the black tiles are kind of expensive ( i got hem on ebay, don't remember the name offhand) and a little flimsy, but they haven't sagged after 2 years and look good and you don't have to mess around with painting them, which I think is harder than it sounds, to make it look good anyway.

photobucket-3257-1322763627385.jpg
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post #8 of 8 Old 07-09-2012, 03:50 PM - Thread Starter
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