Hiding cables - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 08-30-2012, 10:28 PM - Thread Starter
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Howdy,

I don't know if this is the right place, by I am trying to figure out how to hide a HDMI cable from my receiver to projector.

I am afraid of trying to do an in-wall installation, I wouldn't know where to start, so I am wondering if there is something out there which will adequately hide a cable on the ceiling.

Also, do you think I can run a 35ft monoprice cable and still get 1080p?

Thanks
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post #2 of 9 Old 08-31-2012, 06:38 AM
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The monoprice should work at 35 ft. Monoprice sells several grades, and I would recommend getting the best one.

There really isn't much to do with the ceiling. You really didn't provide enough information. Is this a basement? Is there an attic above it, or another floor? Do you know which way the joists run? Basically the best answer is to run it in the ceiling. Ermember, you also need to run power up there as well.

The other answer is to use cable races (plastic channel), but that will be visible.
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post #3 of 9 Old 08-31-2012, 09:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply.

It is a 1st floor game room, with another floor above. The joist run in what I believe would be considered the desire direction - from the projector to the screen. I have never tried to run anything through a wall or ceiling. How hard is it without making massive holes?

Monoprice sells cables with 'Redmere' that guarantee high speed over 25', but they are kinda pricey. I was wondering about the standard speed cables they sell.
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post #4 of 9 Old 08-31-2012, 02:51 PM
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It is not hard if you have a hole saw and a knack for drywall patching. I actually had to do this twice in my own basement. First time when I made a decision to get a projector and 2nd time when I moved the mount and switched HDMI for DVI cables.

I like cutting 4 inch round holes with the hole saw and a drill, Then I save the part I cut out and use it as the patch. With that size hole you can reach in and really grab hold of things, An experienced installer can do it with MUCH smaller holes, but you need the right drill bits, snakes and push rods.
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post #5 of 9 Old 08-31-2012, 07:27 PM
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Do it the easy way, and cut as many holes as you like, and hire a painter who does drywall.

Easy peasy.

If the ceiling joists are running in the right direction, to your AVR (not the screen), then you'll prob only need drywall repair where the ceiling meets the wall, getting the cables around the corner.

And +1 don't forget power to the projector. And you might want to run a couple category cables too.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. -Buddha

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post #6 of 9 Old 09-01-2012, 12:53 PM - Thread Starter
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So the more I think about it, the more tempted I am to go the in-wall/in-ceiling route.

Has anyone here run a new outlet from the back of an old one? How hard would this be? Are there any code ramifications? Do you need secure the new cable you run to the studs and joists?

So once you cut a hole with the hole-saw, how do 'stick' it back in place?
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post #7 of 9 Old 09-01-2012, 09:34 PM
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My drywall guy charges about $20/hole.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. -Buddha

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post #8 of 9 Old 09-02-2012, 09:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hubbs1982 View Post

So the more I think about it, the more tempted I am to go the in-wall/in-ceiling route.
Has anyone here run a new outlet from the back of an old one? How hard would this be? Are there any code ramifications? Do you need secure the new cable you run to the studs and joists?

We talking about power now? You don't have to secure the wire - that's mostly done to prevent damage to the cable during construction. With the drywall already up, not going to get damaged... Now, if you've got a hole open big enough to tack the romex to a stud, do that.

If you haven't done this work before, you might find an electrician that can do that for you for not a lot of money... Especially if you're going to poke some holes for the low-volt stuff to be repaired anyway...
Quote:
So once you cut a hole with the hole-saw, how do 'stick' it back in place?

There's mesh kits or other ways to "back" the piece and hold it in place during patching. But honestly, the chunks get so damaged during removal that most repair guys I've seen will just use a new scrap piece as it's less work.

Jeff

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post #9 of 9 Old 09-02-2012, 05:51 PM
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A good trick, if you know you're going to patch the hole, is to cut the hole with a beveled edge, so the piece doesn't need a scrap of wood to hold it in place.

Minor import; takes 2 minutes to screw in a wood scrap, for support of the patch.

http://www.icanfixupmyhome.com/images/DrywallRepair2_JeffCrist.jpg

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