solid core door vs. do nothing? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 10-30-2012, 03:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi,

I have a bedroom in my house where I like to play music (saxophone, along with the stereo). It is very close to the bedroom my other half sleeps in, and sometimes she is studying or goes to bed while I am playing. I have standard walls (perhaps 1/2" sheetrock if I had to guess?), and a 30" by 80" hollow core, cheap $19 door seen here

http://www.homedepot.com/Doors-Windows-Interior-Doors/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbuhv/R-100009838/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&storeId=10051&superSkuId=202766729

While I would love to soundproof (for lack of a better word) this room, the logistics just arent there, and I dont have enough dough to build a soundproof shed (original plan). No other room in the house makes sense to use as a practice area. I figure though, since the other half can still manage to somehow sleep, at least somewhat, while Im practicing, I can at least bring the STC and OITC ratings of the door up close to that of the wall in the room.

I know Ted said in another thread that it may not be worth it to put a solid core door setup if that is the only step you will take, but I feel it would help quite a bit in my particular case. I would get exterior opening hardware (w/the threshold and weatherstrip), and then hopefully get an automatic door bottom (probably too much trouble to fully mortise, or not?), along with an adjustable door stop, like the one at soundproof company.

I spoke with 3 local lumber yards today, each said a 1 3/4" interior door would be a special order item, but they could easily get them. For flush doors, I was told by two of them I could get a birch or luan (spelling?) - upon inspection of a table from another thread, birch appears quite heavy. One I spoke to will get me some weight figures tomorrow, for a 30" by 80" door, I would hope for what kind of weight? Thanks.
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post #2 of 13 Old 11-02-2012, 07:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Got an update today - apparently the door I can get weighs 102 pounds - not bad I say. My only concern is that since the door should help cut out more of the highs than the lows, and thus the gf might sense more of the deeper bass tones. She said it wouldnt be a problem, anyone have experience with this?

This door would be mounted on an exterior frame, so I guess this would help seal around all 4 sides - would I still need additional sealing at the bottom of the door, or would that not be necessary? The room is carpeted with a thick pile carpet, and Id rather not cut the carpet to accomodate an automatic door bottom. I guess I wouldnt need the door seal that mounts to the door stop either, I could always add later if I wanted.

Maybe some MLV if there is a gap between the door frame and drywall? Thanks
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post #3 of 13 Old 11-02-2012, 08:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Also, should I go with the single rabbeted or double rabbeted jamb? thanks
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post #4 of 13 Old 11-03-2012, 08:58 AM
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I would get the solid core door. Try and install so the gap at the bottom is as small as you can tolerate. Then look to lay some sort of heavy draft stop to cover the bottom. You might consider trying some closed cell foam tape on the edges of the door stop molding.

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post #5 of 13 Old 11-05-2012, 10:29 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice Ted. When I inspected the door frame closer, I realized it was a metal, one piece frame (including the jambs and casing on both sides. I had a friend from the lumber yard (who I am ordering the new door from) come take a look, it sounds like it will be a pain to get the old frame out. Apparently there is some clip (instead of a shim I guess) near the bottom on both sides, between the jamb and stud. So it looks like I am in for a fun time. The frame appears very sturdy, I am hoping a sawzall has the juice to cut through it.
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post #6 of 13 Old 12-08-2012, 06:37 PM - Thread Starter
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So as an update, I bought a solid core interior door, 1 3/4" thick, mounted on an exterior door frame (so it came with weatherstripping and an oak threshold). I went to put the door in the other day with a carpenter, and guess what? It was too damn tall. So I am having it resent to the manufacturer to have it cut down to size. I havent figured out yet exactly how much I want to take off the door and jambs, so I seek anyone's input.

oak threshold.jpg 21k .jpg file

The oak threshold is similar to this pic, so it extends down an extra half inch on the front. I have a hardwood flooring in the hallway (where the front of the threshold would sit on top of) and then a soft (ie somewhat thick) carpeting in the bedroom I am using the door for. My problem is, if I put the threshold so that the front part is sitting on top of the hardwood floor, the bottom of the door will probably be very high off the floor in the bedroom, since it will be propped up an extra half inch above the level of the wood floor, which is about the same height as the carpet, maybe slightly less. If i recess a notch in the wood floor (about a half inch deep before I hit asbestos laden tile), then the edge of the wood floor will be exposed, vulnerable to damage when stepped on, since the threshold would be sitting behind it, not on top of it.

I dont really care for the wood floor, it is a glueless, spongy floating floor that wasnt really installed professionally, but Id rather not crack it up if I can help it. And I dont have extra pieces laying around in case it does crack. Finally, how much of a gap should I leave between the header and top jamb? If I leave only half an inch, is that too tight as far as expansion/contraction and the fact I will have to make adjustments when I put the door in? I plan to fill that with non-expanding foam and acoustical sealant anyhow. Thanks for any input, much appreciated.
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post #7 of 13 Old 12-09-2012, 03:55 AM
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A full 1/2 inch is fine. Your bigger problem is that the oak threshold should not be sitting on top of a spongy laminate floor. Your carpenter should have mentioned that. In your case I would take a multi tool and carve out the foot print of the door. You also need to cut the carpet. The door needs to sit firmly on the subfloor


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post #8 of 13 Old 12-09-2012, 03:58 AM
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You can put a piece of quarter round molding over the joint. If oak isn't high enough put some plywood under it.


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post #9 of 13 Old 12-09-2012, 07:49 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks very much for the prompt response, I kind of need to let the lumber yard know asap. I didnt realize it could be a problem with the oak threshold (the edge of it) sitting on top of the edge of the hardwood floor (its floating but still hardwood), considering I would have supported the rest of the threshold underneath with some plywood to level it off ( I may not have been clear about that). My gut instinct was to notch it into the floor, so Im glad I dont have to go buy/borrow another tool for that job, as I already have a ridgid multimax. I guess success lies in keeping the edge of the floor tight to the edge of the threshold, and a nice piece of quarter round sounds like a good way to finish it.

At this point, just want to make sure my calculations sound right, because they sound right inside my head. From the bottom of the threshold (the lowest point, the part that hangs down in front) to the top of the top jamb, is 80.5". My rough opening, from the hardwood floor surface to the header, is 80". If I cut into the 1/2" hardwood floor, now both heights are equal (frame and opening). So if I have them take off 1/2", thats my gap I need between top jamb/header. Part of me just wants to tell them 0.75" just to be safe, but Id rather not incresae the gap unneccesarily. Thank you very much again.
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post #10 of 13 Old 12-10-2012, 04:48 AM
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Putting plywood under the threshold is valid alternative. I would make sure that you don't capture the cushy hardwood, If you can slide it out at some point in the future then everything should work fine. My logic is the door is "forever", the flooring on both sides comes and goes.


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post #11 of 13 Old 12-10-2012, 06:30 AM - Thread Starter
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Thats a great way to think of it, and it applies in this situation. I am now thinking I may not have to spend the dough to have the door cut down at all. I measured last night, and if I draw a level line from the carpet inside the room to the threshold (I have a couple pieces of the front edge of the threshold laying around since we cut part of the horns off last time), it gives me 7/16" of threshold that sticks above the carpet. Combined with Im guessing a typical 1/8" gap between bottom of door and threshold, that would mean the bottom of the door theoretically, without taking into account shimming for level and plumb, would swing 9/16" above the carpet. The front of the threshold extends down like I said about a 1/2" below the rest of it, so I have that much I can cut off the bottom.

If I cut the 1/2" off the front, then theoretically it gives me 1/16" for the door to swing above the carpet, and 1/2" at the top of the jamb. If I have to raise above this point at all, I will need exta space at the header area, and could always plane off only what I need (not sure what tool would work best for precision and evenness), and still not have it look too funny (I have 4 other doors, same height in one small hallway). Or I could have them plane off 1/4" and give myself a little wiggle room.
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post #12 of 13 Old 12-10-2012, 06:47 AM - Thread Starter
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Tonights task is to go home and remeasure the other 4 doors, from the floor to the bottom of the casing, and make sure that measurement matches to what Im doing. The other 4 doors have those metal one piece frames, and I will be putting the wood standard New England colonial pine casing (I tihnk thats what its called) on this door.
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post #13 of 13 Old 12-14-2012, 12:03 PM - Thread Starter
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So looks like the trim casing should match up pretty evenly in terms of height of the header trim, maybe slightly higher. I plan to trim the bottom front of that threshold - it sticks down 1/2" extra in the front, so I will trim that 1/2" off.

One thing I am wondering tho

I do not want to prop up threshold at all, since it may make the overall frame a little too tall. The subfloor right now is partially cracked tile (perhaps asbestos), and I dont know whether I need to basically level this off, especially since I dont want to raise the threshold height.
I am getting the door back fromthe lumberyard tomorrow, as I decided not to have the door and frame cut down at all.
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