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post #1 of 68 Old 11-25-2012, 06:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Okay...so I'm finally getting my theater going. I'm finishing it with the basement, and the theater is proving to be the stalling element of the project. I'm having a hard time making decisions and understanding the best way to do things, and it's slowing me down.

First things first...the room. The room is 17'3" deep and 15'7" wide. I have 9 foot ceilings. There are no windows in the room, but there is a double door on one side. Please see the following snapsnot of the layout on graph paper (I'm working on a nice google sketchup, but I don't have time to finish it right now).

2012-11-25-18.32.45-e1353893710870.jpg

I am planning to have a fairly simple stage at the front, a 10" riser in the rear, and two rows of seats. I am hoping I can get 5 seats in the back row and 4 seats in the front row, but I have plenty of time to figure that out. Right now I figure out the riser, and the hvac.

Looking at the room, the wall opposite the door is a concrete wall...the foundation of the house. The room to the right of the door (the top of the picture) borders a family room, and the wall labeled "screen wall" borders a guest bedroom. The wall with the door borders a hallway (obviously).

Okay...back to the HVAC. I live in Utah, and the temperature in the basement has an amazingly consistent temperature. Because of this, I'm going to just pull heat runs off the existing trunk line for the upstairs (we have a rambler) for all the rooms in the basement except the theater. The idea is that most the time, the vents in the basement will be closed because the temperature down there is so ideal year round. The only room I'm concerned about is the theater. I fear that it will get hot in the there with a bunch of people and a projector (all other equipment is rack mounted in the utility room). What are my best options for HVAC in this room? I'm going to build a soffitt/valence around the room to give the ceiling some depth, and I'm thinking I may be able to install a mini split system inside that valence. Does anyone have any thoughts or opinions on that? Will that sufficiently cool the room without any sort of return air? I fear the air in that room may get stale or stagnant. I'm also thinking of installing the projector in the valence, and if I do that I'll mount a whisper quiet fan with a vent to outside. Can anyone offer any suggestions on what I can do to heat/cool this room?

Second question...the riser. I'm going to make it 10 inches high, I am just uncertain on how deep to make it. I realize that 17'3" is somewhat short, and I'm hoping for a 110" screen. Can anyone give me any advice on deep to build this riser? I'll make it the entire width of the room...it's just the depth that's in question. I would like to get all reclining seats, if possible.

I'll get the wiring to the room finished up this week, and I'd like to get the riser built this weekend. I also need to get a handle on the HVAC so I can figure out which way to go there.

Thanks in advance.

Dan
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post #2 of 68 Old 11-25-2012, 07:04 PM - Thread Starter
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So, I've been doing some thinking, and I am thinking a 6 foot riser might make sense. If I go with Berkline seats, that will leave me over two feet of room in front of the seats.

Thoughts?

I'm also thinking that the seating configuration may be 4 in the back and 3 in the front, although I'd love to do 5 in the back and 4 in the front if I could make it work. Has anyone done 5 wide in a room 15' 7" wide before?
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post #3 of 68 Old 11-25-2012, 09:30 PM
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If you really want two rows of recliners, I'd go with a 7' deep riser. This wouldn't leave you much room between the riser and screen however. Are you planning on hanging the screen directly on the wall with speakers to the sides or do you have plans for a shallow false wall? If a false wall with hidden speakers is part of the plan, you might need to look at a different type of seat for the back row (non-reclining) so you can push the front row back and go with a smaller riser. Or you might need to consider shrinking your screen size since the front row will be fairly close.

You are on the right track developing your Sketchup plan. Be sure to include all of the major components in the room (seats, riser, stage, screen, etc) so you can work out all of the kinks BEFORE you start building stuff. You don't want to have to rip apart your riser if you find that it doesn't work for some reason. One thing you should double check is the riser height. 10" seems a bit low. Have you used the riser height calculator? Link

Have you considered soundproofing for this space?
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post #4 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 02:12 AM
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Just a few comments.

I agree that the rear row should probably forgo the recliners. Really needs a lot more depth especially if someone wants to walk past a reclined person.

I have a 17' long room, and used a 6' riser with seats that have reclining backs, but no footrests. So it's nicer than most commercial theaters in that respect.

The other benefits of the 6' riser:

--The rear listeners can keep their ears 2' away from the back wall, which helps the surround effect and avoids massively goosed bass. I see so many room where the seats are flush against the wall, and that's not going to work.

--The front seats can be back far enough to be almost directly aside a wall that can support a surround speaker. Otherwise the surrounds will be further behind, and that will diminish envelopment. (I'm assuming you will have 4 surrounds in a 7.1 setup.)

The front row is 10' from the screen as shown, so you can use a 110" or even a 120" (1.78 diag) screen.

As for HVAC, I found the mini-split a great solution. I used a vented version mini-split from Mr. Slim rather than the in-room type, so the motor/vibration is several feet away. I blow the cold air into the front and rear soffits, and the return is over the middle.

One last major issue is to start thinking about besides the screen wall (or not) is bass performance. How good do you want it? Not just loudness, but smoothness. And not just in the MLP, but in other seats. Is that an issue?


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AV7702 Atmos 7.4.4, SSP-800 PLIIx 7.4
Aerial Acoustics 7B/CC3B fronts, B&W CWM8180 surrounds, Tannoy Di6 DC heights, Hsu ULS-15 subs
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post #5 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 02:30 AM
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You'll need some type of return otherwise forced air may have a hard time entering the room. smile.gif

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Design-Video & Audio Calibration Information

The original Pro Theater Layout
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post #6 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 12:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

If you really want two rows of recliners, I'd go with a 7' deep riser. This wouldn't leave you much room between the riser and screen however. Are you planning on hanging the screen directly on the wall with speakers to the sides or do you have plans for a shallow false wall? If a false wall with hidden speakers is part of the plan, you might need to look at a different type of seat for the back row (non-reclining) so you can push the front row back and go with a smaller riser. Or you might need to consider shrinking your screen size since the front row will be fairly close.
You are on the right track developing your Sketchup plan. Be sure to include all of the major components in the room (seats, riser, stage, screen, etc) so you can work out all of the kinks BEFORE you start building stuff. You don't want to have to rip apart your riser if you find that it doesn't work for some reason. One thing you should double check is the riser height. 10" seems a bit low. Have you used the riser height calculator? Link
Have you considered soundproofing for this space?

Spaceman, thanks for your reply! I haven't used the Riser calculator. I don't have all those detailed measurements to use the calculator, but I am not married to 10" by any means. Are you thinking that 12" would make more sense?

I have considered soundproofing for this space. The ceiling is insulated, and the walls will be insulated. I will double up the drywall, and use GG between the sheets. I will make sure that the stage and riser and screwed AND glued together, and I am planning to lay some roofing felt/material between the concrete and the riser/stage. I am not overly worried about soundproofing to the extent of building a "room within a room". We're not big loud sound people...just going to be watching movies as a family.
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Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Just a few comments.
I agree that the rear row should probably forgo the recliners. Really needs a lot more depth especially if someone wants to walk past a reclined person.
I have a 17' long room, and used a 6' riser with seats that have reclining backs, but no footrests. So it's nicer than most commercial theaters in that respect.
The other benefits of the 6' riser:
--The rear listeners can keep their ears 2' away from the back wall, which helps the surround effect and avoids massively goosed bass. I see so many room where the seats are flush against the wall, and that's not going to work.
--The front seats can be back far enough to be almost directly aside a wall that can support a surround speaker. Otherwise the surrounds will be further behind, and that will diminish envelopment. (I'm assuming you will have 4 surrounds in a 7.1 setup.)
The front row is 10' from the screen as shown, so you can use a 110" or even a 120" (1.78 diag) screen.
As for HVAC, I found the mini-split a great solution. I used a vented version mini-split from Mr. Slim rather than the in-room type, so the motor/vibration is several feet away. I blow the cold air into the front and rear soffits, and the return is over the middle.
One last major issue is to start thinking about besides the screen wall (or not) is bass performance. How good do you want it? Not just loudness, but smoothness. And not just in the MLP, but in other seats. Is that an issue?

Roger Dressler, thank you so much. I like your thought of using rear seats that recline, but have no footrest. People will be able to exit the row from either side, so I'm not overly concerned with having to walk past a reclined person. At most, it would be one person (if I squeeze 5 seats in the back I guess it could be two), but I don't see this being a huge problem.

I like your thoughts on using the minisplit in that fashion. Across the hall from the theater, is a storage room. I think it would be fairly easy to mount the mini split to the ceiling in the storage room, and I could run duct work in to the room, and around the room inside the soffit. I could also create a return air duct, and hide it in the soffit. The other good thing with this is any sound that traveled through the duct, would just go in to the storage room. The storage room is under the front porch and entry way, but the ceiling in the storage room is insulated as well. I will definitely start to look more seriously at the minisplit.

I am going to mount the screen directly on the wall, and mount the front surrounds in the wall as well.

Just curious...is that drawing of your theater is did you sketch that up as a drawing of mine based on what I posted? I am not very good with Google Sketchup...the biggest issue I'm having right now is making the "walls" and "objects" an exact dimension. Right now I am dragging the mouse, getting it as close as I can watching the dimensions in the corner, and calling it good. Is there a better way?
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Originally Posted by SierraMikeBravo View Post

You'll need some type of return otherwise forced air may have a hard time entering the room. smile.gif

I realize that SierraMikeBravo...I've just been trying to figure through the solution in my head. smile.gif

So...I'm thinking that a 6 foot deep riser will work...now I just need to figure out the height. Spaceman has me leaning towards 12". Part of it will depend on how far down the soffit goes...if I drop the soffit down 10 inches, and have a 12 inch riser, that gives me just over 7 feet of clearance. Although I do have a friend that is 7' 6" tall...he's used to having to duck anyways smile.gif
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post #7 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 01:09 PM - Thread Starter
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I just got off the phone with the theater chair guy. Now, I'm thinking 6' 6" deep riser, at 12" high. This will allow for 5 of the "Lane 175 Grand Slam" or "Palliser Blade" on the back. They can be curved and recline, and it sounds like I'll have enough room. Then I will build a step on either side that is 2 feet wide, and it will give me plenty of room to clear the straight row of 4 in the front.

I'm getting excited!

Dan
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post #8 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhendriksen View Post

Spaceman, thanks for your reply! I haven't used the Riser calculator. I don't have all those detailed measurements to use the calculator, but I am not married to 10" by any means. Are you thinking that 12" would make more sense?
Just to chime in on riser rise, I'm using a 12" even though the ceiling is only 8' (soffit drops 10"). With 9' you'd have even more headroom for the soffit. Should be fine.
Quote:
I like your thoughts on using the minisplit in that fashion. Across the hall from the theater, is a storage room. I think it would be fairly easy to mount the mini split to the ceiling in the storage room, and I could run duct work in to the room, and around the room inside the soffit. I could also create a return air duct, and hide it in the soffit. The other good thing with this is any sound that traveled through the duct, would just go in to the storage room. The storage room is under the front porch and entry way, but the ceiling in the storage room is insulated as well.
That all sounds good. As for your air return, it could be pulled through the side wall and soffit, above the door. The red in the diagram. Blue is the cold air feed.


Quote:
I am going to mount the screen directly on the wall, and mount the front surrounds in the wall as well.
Just to clarify the Ls/Rs will be in-walls, as I showed? How about the rear surrounds? I used in-walls for all 4 and mounted the rears in angled cabinets to get them to crossfire.

Are you mounting the L/C/R in-wall behind the screen, or are they floor-standing?
Any thoughts about subwoofers?
Quote:
Just curious...is that drawing of your theater is did you sketch that up as a drawing of mine based on what I posted?
That is my interpretation of your theater. I used your dimensions for the room and doorway. This is not Sketchup, but a 2D graphics program called Corel Designer. If sketchup is too steep a learning curve (it was for me), you might try Sweethome3D. It can whip out a rendering like this pretty quickly. But it does not have all the fancy dimensioning callouts.

attachment.php?attachmentid=167670&d=1266632936
Quote:
I am not very good with Google Sketchup...the biggest issue I'm having right now is making the "walls" and "objects" an exact dimension. Right now I am dragging the mouse, getting it as close as I can watching the dimensions in the corner, and calling it good. Is there a better way?
Yes. Just type in the dimensions into the measurement bar. It is explained here.

Deadwood Atmos theater
AV7702 Atmos 7.4.4, SSP-800 PLIIx 7.4
Aerial Acoustics 7B/CC3B fronts, B&W CWM8180 surrounds, Tannoy Di6 DC heights, Hsu ULS-15 subs
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post #9 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 03:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhendriksen View Post

Spaceman, thanks for your reply! I haven't used the Riser calculator. I don't have all those detailed measurements to use the calculator, but I am not married to 10" by any means. Are you thinking that 12" would make more sense?

I'm guessing something in the 12-14" range. As you can see in the calculator, there are many variables that can change that number. As you work through your plan, your seating distances will start to come together. For eye and ear heights, you can figure those out sitting in any old couch or recliner.

My riser is 12-3/4" high (2x12 with 2 layers of 3/4" ply). Even with that, I still need to add a mini-riser directly under the footprint of the rear seats to get them up to the correct height. I can't recall what that is at the moment. I think I need another 4" or so. By doing a mini-riser just under the seats, I can keep the main riser low enough to maintain sufficient headroom under the soffits. You might need to look at that, depending on how far you drop your soffits.
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post #10 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 03:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhendriksen View Post

I just got off the phone with the theater chair guy. Now, I'm thinking 6' 6" deep riser, at 12" high. This will allow for 5 of the "Lane 175 Grand Slam" or "Palliser Blade" on the back. They can be curved and recline, and it sounds like I'll have enough room. Then I will build a step on either side that is 2 feet wide, and it will give me plenty of room to clear the straight row of 4 in the front.
I'm getting excited!
Here's what a curved set of 5 Gran Slams would look like on a 6.5' riser. Pretty grand, but also slammed. As you can tell, it will be very helpful for you to have your graphics program running as you iterate the design among the myriad options. It took me several months to get it all decided.


Deadwood Atmos theater
AV7702 Atmos 7.4.4, SSP-800 PLIIx 7.4
Aerial Acoustics 7B/CC3B fronts, B&W CWM8180 surrounds, Tannoy Di6 DC heights, Hsu ULS-15 subs
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post #11 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Here's what a curved set of 5 Gran Slams would look like on a 6.5' riser. Pretty grand, but also slammed. As you can tell, it will be very helpful for you to have your graphics program running as you iterate the design among the myriad options. It took me several months to get it all decided.

It took me two years to get through the research and design phase.mad.gif
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post #12 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 04:48 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Here's what a curved set of 5 Gran Slams would look like on a 6.5' riser. Pretty grand, but also slammed. As you can tell, it will be very helpful for you to have your graphics program running as you iterate the design among the myriad options. It took me several months to get it all decided.

Thanks for sketching that up for me. I'm thinking of having the middle 3 straight, and then the last two curved. That's the idea that I'm kicking around right now. I've got 3 kids, and I want to make sure we have room for their friends our family when we all get together.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Just to chime in on riser rise, I'm using a 12" even though the ceiling is only 8' (soffit drops 10"). With 9' you'd have even more headroom for the soffit. Should be fine.
That all sounds good. As for your air return, it could be pulled through the side wall and soffit, above the door. The red in the diagram. Blue is the cold air feed.

Just to clarify the Ls/Rs will be in-walls, as I showed? How about the rear surrounds? I used in-walls for all 4 and mounted the rears in angled cabinets to get them to crossfire.
Are you mounting the L/C/R in-wall behind the screen, or are they floor-standing?
Any thoughts about subwoofers?
That is my interpretation of your theater. I used your dimensions for the room and doorway. This is not Sketchup, but a 2D graphics program called Corel Designer. If sketchup is too steep a learning curve (it was for me), you might try Sweethome3D. It can whip out a rendering like this pretty quickly. But it does not have all the fancy dimensioning callouts.
attachment.php?attachmentid=167670&d=1266632936
Yes. Just type in the dimensions into the measurement bar. It is explained here.

RE: Google Sketchup - Thanks for linking me to that Google Sketchup Link. I think I'll spend a little more time playing with that.

RE: HVAC - You hit the nail right on the head with what I was thinking RE: the heating and cooling runs.

RE speakers: the Ls/Rs being in-wall, I haven't decided for sure. I have speaker wire ran for both applications at this point, so I am undecided. I had/have the wire available in whatever quantity I need, so I'm playing it safe and planning for the future as much as I can. The L/C/R are going to be in-wall, but not behind the screen. I'm planning to put them on either side of the screen, and just below the screen. Subwoofers...I have given it thought. I've ran 4 dedicated circuits and 4 x RG6 to each corner of the room. Well, not quite the corner...they are on the front and rear walls, about 18 inches in from the corner. I figure this way I can play around with subwoofer placement.

RE: the interpretation of my theater. That is a very cool drawing, and I would give anything to be able to work something like that up quickly. You're interpretation is not quite right though. The riser is the full width of the room, and there is a double door (63" opening) that enters just in front of the riser and step. Currently I'm thinking a riser at 6' 4" long and 12 5/8" high, going the full width of the room. Then on either side I will build a 6" stall step, that is two feet wide. The set of 4 seats will fall nicely between the steps with about 6" of clearance on either side.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

I'm guessing something in the 12-14" range. As you can see in the calculator, there are many variables that can change that number. As you work through your plan, your seating distances will start to come together. For eye and ear heights, you can figure those out sitting in any old couch or recliner.
My riser is 12-3/4" high (2x12 with 2 layers of 3/4" ply). Even with that, I still need to add a mini-riser directly under the footprint of the rear seats to get them up to the correct height. I can't recall what that is at the moment. I think I need another 4" or so. By doing a mini-riser just under the seats, I can keep the main riser low enough to maintain sufficient headroom under the soffits. You might need to look at that, depending on how far you drop your soffits.

I am planning to drop my soffits by 10", but I am not 100% certain on that yet. I'm at my office, and when I get home I need to take a closer look at the HVAC. I'm guessing that the ductwork will probably be between 6" and 8", so if I go 10" then I'll have plenty of room.

I think I covered all the points that I meant to. Thanks so much for your help thus far.

Now, I need to decide whether or not I want to do columns. I'm leaning towards doing them in some form of stain grade wood, and doing them after the drywall. I'll put wall boxes in where I want the sconces to go, but I may build stain grade columns over them, and mount the sconce on the column. This is a less pressing issue however...
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post #13 of 68 Old 11-26-2012, 04:51 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

It took me two years to get through the research and design phase.mad.gif

I wish I had two years. Wife wants the basement done, and she has good reason for it. It's winter time, which means I've got more time on my hands (I ride a bicycle ~300 miles per week March - October) and she wants it done before next cycling season. So, I'm in full blown basement finish mode. I'm hoping/planning for drywall in early January. I'm guessing I'll be done with everything up to that point by mid-December...so I'll have a couple of weeks to look, ponder and make sure I've covered all my bases.

Thanks again guys...I'll be back with many more questions I'm sure smile.gif
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post #14 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 02:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhendriksen View Post

I'm thinking of having the middle 3 straight, and then the last two curved.

Voilà.


Quote:
RE: the interpretation of my theater. That is a very cool drawing, and I would give anything to be able to work something like that up quickly. You're interpretation is not quite right though. The riser is the full width of the room, and there is a double door (63" opening) that enters just in front of the riser and step. Currently I'm thinking a riser at 6' 4" long
I shaded the riser (and stage) a lighter gray, it does run the full 15'7" width of the room. The interior dims and door location are per Post #1.
Quote:
Then on either side I will build a 6" stall step, that is two feet wide. The set of 4 seats will fall nicely between the steps with about 6" of clearance on either side.
I used the 120" width from Grand Slam. That's 10', + 4' for stairs, for a total of 14'. The room is 15'7", so that's 19" split to 9.5" gaps flanking the sofa.

Anyway, you're on your way to creating a great theater for the family. You'll get elected father of the year for sure!

Deadwood Atmos theater
AV7702 Atmos 7.4.4, SSP-800 PLIIx 7.4
Aerial Acoustics 7B/CC3B fronts, B&W CWM8180 surrounds, Tannoy Di6 DC heights, Hsu ULS-15 subs
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post #15 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 01:22 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Voilà.

I shaded the riser (and stage) a lighter gray, it does run the full 15'7" width of the room. The interior dims and door location are per Post #1.
I used the 120" width from Grand Slam. That's 10', + 4' for stairs, for a total of 14'. The room is 15'7", so that's 19" split to 9.5" gaps flanking the sofa.

That rendering above is correct, it was the one below that I was referring to when I said I didn't think you were understanding it exactly right.
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attachment.php?attachmentid=167670&d=1266632936
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Anyway, you're on your way to creating a great theater for the family. You'll get elected father of the year for sure!

Thanks Roger...we're really excited about it! I'm going to pickup the lumber for the riser this week. Here's a question for everybody. RE: the stage and the riser, is one layer of 5/8" tongue and grove OSB on the top sufficient? Do I need two layers? Also, what's the reasoning behind filling it with sand? Is that really necessary? We're not "big sound" people that are going to blast the volume at unmanageable levels while the rest of the family is trying to sleep...
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post #16 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 01:40 PM
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I think you mentioned in another post that you planned on doing double drywall and green glue. If that's the case, you'll want to do all of that first and then build your riser and stage inside the soundproof shell. Even if you're not doing double layers with green glue, it would probably be easier to drywall the room without having to cut around the stage and riser. It would also allow a future homeowner to remove the stage and riser if they wanted to use the room for something else, while still having a completely drywalled room.

I would suggest at least 2 layers of osb for the stage and riser. Some people use 3. Sand in your stage and insulation in your riser will keep them from resonating. The sand really helps and should be used if your speakers/sub will sit directly on the stage.
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post #17 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 02:03 PM - Thread Starter
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I think you mentioned in another post that you planned on doing double drywall and green glue. If that's the case, you'll want to do all of that first and then build your riser and stage inside the soundproof shell. Even if you're not doing double layers with green glue, it would probably be easier to drywall the room without having to cut around the stage and riser. It would also allow a future homeowner to remove the stage and riser if they wanted to use the room for something else, while still having a completely drywalled room.
I would suggest at least 2 layers of osb for the stage and riser. Some people use 3. Sand in your stage and insulation in your riser will keep them from resonating. The sand really helps and should be used if your speakers/sub will sit directly on the stage.

Thanks Spaceman. I met with the drywaller last night, and we are going to double up the drywall (except on the wall that is up against concrete), however I don't think we're going to use the green glue. I think for ease of electrical and what not, I'm going to build the stage and riser before the drywall goes in. The sub(s) will most definitely sit on the stage and/or the riser, so if it makes that big of a difference I will do it. My local HT guy said he personally wouldn't do it, but he's a guy that specializes in the "$5k theater in a box" type stuff. He's a good friend, a fairly smart guy and I trust his judgement, but I think he may have limited experience in the ground up building of a dedicated room.

How does filling the stage up with sand affect the electrical that is ran inside of it? I would think that could be problematic. I don't want to cut any corners, but I also don't want to spend time/money foolishly. There comes a point of a diminishing return. I want to find that balance between reasonable cost and reasonable performance.
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post #18 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 02:56 PM
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Will you need electrical in your stage? Most run electrical in their risers for motorized recliners, etc, but any outlets in the vicinity of the stage usually get placed on the front wall.
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post #19 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 03:11 PM - Thread Starter
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Will you need electrical in your stage? Most run electrical in their risers for motorized recliners, etc, but any outlets in the vicinity of the stage usually get placed on the front wall.

I was going to put "step lights" and/or rope lights under the lip of the stage. At least, that's what I'm thinking right now.

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post #20 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 03:28 PM
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Most prefer the screen wall, including the stage, to be completely dark so the only focus is on the screen. Step lights seem unnecessary since you won't have (or want) people going up and down your stage, unless you're hosting Karaoke night. I could see those becoming more of a distraction. Rope lights might add to the pre-movie atmosphere, but you would probably want them off during a movie. My vote would be to incorporate those items in your riser design and keep the stage nice and dark.
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post #21 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 03:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Most prefer the screen wall, including the stage, to be completely dark so the only focus is on the screen. Step lights seem unnecessary since you won't have (or want) people going up and down your stage, unless you're hosting Karaoke night. I could see those becoming more of a distraction. Rope lights might add to the pre-movie atmosphere, but you would probably want them off during a movie. My vote would be to incorporate those items in your riser design and keep the stage nice and dark.

That sounds like solid advice, thank you. I will leave any/all electrical out of the stage. So...now you're got me thinking. Is it a bad idea to build the riser and stage prior to the room getting drywall? I am most definitely going to have electrical work in the stage. Part of me really wants to get that all done prior to the drywall, but I guess I don't have a really good reason for it. I guess I just want to be done with woodworking before the drywall goes in. Get the heavy woodworking tools out of the basement, and not bring them back (save a chop saw which I'll need for the finish carpentry).
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post #22 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 04:34 PM
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Here are some pics showing riser construction after drywall and how I handled bringing electrical and low voltage wires into the riser.

In the lower right corner of this slightly blurry pic, about 6 inches above the floor, you'll see a piece of empty conduit and 2 pieces of yellow romex sticking out of the wall. When drywall went up, they made one hole for the conduit and made a 2nd hole for the romex.
IMG_0217.jpg

Here is the same shot post-drywall.
IMG_0314.jpg

And after I started framing the riser.
IMG_0315.jpg

The conduit was extended to a low voltage box on the face of the riser. One piece of the romex was terminated at the first step light and the 2nd piece of romex went to the first duplex receptacle on the face of the riser.
IMG_0323.jpg
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post #23 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 06:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for sharing. If you don't mind me asking, what's the reasoning for the roofing felt on the floor?
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post #24 of 68 Old 11-27-2012, 09:06 PM
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It's commonly used in basement builds for moisture but I used it in my 2nd floor build to minimize wood to wood squeaks.
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post #25 of 68 Old 11-28-2012, 01:46 AM
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That rendering above is correct, it was the one below that I was referring to when I said I didn't think you were understanding it exactly right.
Oh, that's not your room. It's just an existing render from SweetHome3D to show you what the results look like. Sorry for the confusion.
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RE: the stage and the riser, is one layer of 5/8" tongue and grove OSB on the top sufficient? Do I need two layers?
I used 2 layers of 5/8" OSB. Just seemed like the thing to do, as the whole house used 1 1/4" OSB for the underlayment.
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Also, what's the reasoning behind filling it with sand? Is that really necessary?
Not in the riser. Just insulation as Spaceman said. The folks in the rear seats will enjoy more tactile feel than those seated on the concrete.

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post #26 of 68 Old 12-02-2012, 09:11 PM - Thread Starter
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I made some good progress in the basement this weekend, and a little bit of that was in the theater...I got the riser built (mostly anyways)! I need to finish up one side of it (all lumber for that side cut) and I need to build the steps.

Anyways, as I'm planning out the room and getting ready for drywall I had a question on the soffit. I am going to do Soundboard and RC Channel on the ceiling, and a layer of Soundboard and drywall on the walls. My question is...should i build the soffit before the drywall is installed, or after? The soffit is going to contain some duct work, but I have figured out how I can work out the duct work post drywall if the soffit should be built post drywall. I am planning to do a star ceiling in the middle of the room, and then have a soffit that includes access lighting and houses the duct work/lights.

So...do I do the soffit before or after the drywall?

Thanks in advance!

Dan
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post #27 of 68 Old 12-03-2012, 06:49 PM - Thread Starter
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No thoughts?

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post #28 of 68 Old 12-03-2012, 07:12 PM
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It's workable both ways, but if you're doing recessed lights in it, the easier option is to soundproof the wall first, and then build the soffit inside your soundproofed room. However, it's still worth over-building the soffit itself to inhibit the introduction of sound into the ductwork through the soffit. If you were to build the soffits before drywall, you'd want to build backer boxes for your recessed lights - and that a pretty serious hassle, IMO.

Maybe that's not a compete answer and recommendation, but at least that's the factors in play.
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post #29 of 68 Old 12-03-2012, 09:05 PM - Thread Starter
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It's workable both ways, but if you're doing recessed lights in it, the easier option is to soundproof the wall first, and then build the soffit inside your soundproofed room. However, it's still worth over-building the soffit itself to inhibit the introduction of sound into the ductwork through the soffit. If you were to build the soffits before drywall, you'd want to build backer boxes for your recessed lights - and that a pretty serious hassle, IMO.

Maybe that's not a compete answer and recommendation, but at least that's the factors in play.

So you're saying it would be a better idea (in your opinion) to build the Soffit in the room AFTER the drywall? If so, I think I agree (just seeking confirmation).

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post #30 of 68 Old 12-04-2012, 11:21 AM
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Yes. I think soffits last is the best route to sound containment; and as that is one of my priorities, that's how I'm building.
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