Running Conduit - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-21-2013, 10:00 AM - Thread Starter
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So I'm finished framing and about to start running my low voltage runs and conduit for future proofing.

Is there an established best practice for bringing conduit (in my case, 1.25" carlon smurf) into the theater?

I'd like to run conduit to several locations:

Stage
Riser
Projector (though this technically won't be in the theater so I don't need to worry about it so much)
Side Surround locations (will be behind columns)
Rear Surround locations (will be behind columns)

Do I simply terminate the conduit in a low voltage box and cut a whole through the drywall or just bring the conduit through the drywall itself? I normally would try to have the conduit enter the theater where a soffit would be placed, but I'm not sure if I'm going to add soffits yet (due to headroom) so I'd rather not lock myself in.


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post #2 of 9 Old 01-21-2013, 09:29 PM
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Using a box or more simply a low voltage ring makes for a cleaner installation. Plus if you don't use a run, you can just install a standard blank plate. With AV cables it's actually better to just use a ring rather than a full box. That way you have plenty of space inside the wall to take up the slack and can leave a nice service loop. Using a box makes multiple connector plates more difficult to install and the opportunity for connection breakage when the plate is pushed in.

They also sell "brush plates". These have a slot with a brush that spreads around the wires coming out. These are great where you don't need or want a connector panel yet still want to use a standard electrical plate.

Note however that commercial electrical codes do not allow box less terminations even for low voltage. Not a problem in most residences but if you live in a high rise condo it could be an issue.

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post #3 of 9 Old 01-21-2013, 10:44 PM
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For flex conduit runs I used a low volt ring with a connection for the conduit. A screw coupler and nut will hold the end in place...

http://www.hometech.com/hts/products/wiring/wallboxes/low_voltage/ai-lvmb.html

You can see ones like that behind my rack:



Jeff


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post #4 of 9 Old 01-22-2013, 03:55 AM
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Conduit is for allowing easier fishing of new cables later - one that you forgot (extra category cable to the projector for control) or don't know of yet (HDMI 3.5b). I wouldn't run it to possible future speaker locations (run speaker wire, and just leave it buried).

Install the conduit empty, it's for future pulls. CYA and run extra category cables to the projector, screen, entrance light keypad location (lighting and other control), and any other places you can think of. As jautor says, it's the it's the Swiss army knife of cables. I'd run 3-4 to the projector minimum (and I know you said it's outside the room wink.gif ).

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post #5 of 9 Old 01-22-2013, 05:34 AM
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I like bringing the conduit into the theater through the smallest opening possible and in many cases that is just a round hole With caulking. If you can bring the conduit in through a hole that will be hidden by a soffit or column even better because that will act to block sound leakage. I often build with a piece of plywood for the projector location and I like building a backer box for the projector conduit on the back of the plywood. The projector outlet should get putty pad or backer box treatment. The common thought of running your wires outside the conduit leads to more holes in your drywall soundproofing bunker and in my opinion is a waste of perfectly good conduit.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1310984/bethesda-build/120_40#post_20234072


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post #6 of 9 Old 01-22-2013, 05:58 AM - Thread Starter
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I thought about doing something like this:

Frame in a small box behind conduit location. On the rear side of the stud, back it with 5/8" osb (secured by Liquid nails and sealed using Green Glue Acoustical Sealant) and use a putty pad on the inside. Next I would drill a 2" hole through the stud to accept the conduit and use the terminal adapters (which happen to slot in perfect in a 2" hole btw!) to secure the conduit to the stud. Then its just the case of mounting a single gang box and picking a suitable faceplate.

Thoughts?

Something like this (but with putty pad and low voltage bracket instead of a box):



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post #7 of 9 Old 01-23-2013, 06:08 AM - Thread Starter
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Come to think of it, on all my walls, i could do this for every box (electrical included). Instead of using 1 sheet of 5/8" osb on the rear side of the stud, how about adding a sheet of 5/8" drywall with green glue in between. That way any sound that leaks through the wall plate/box would hit another double layer of material.

Thoughts?


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post #8 of 9 Old 08-10-2013, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

For flex conduit runs I used a low volt ring with a connection for the conduit. A screw coupler and nut will hold the end in place...

http://www.hometech.com/hts/products/wiring/wallboxes/low_voltage/ai-lvmb.html

You can see ones like that behind my rack:



Jeff

Jeff- What size conduit did you use? Looks like 2" from the pictures. Where can you get low voltage rings for >1" diameter conduit?
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post #9 of 9 Old 08-10-2013, 05:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vivatech View Post

Jeff- What size conduit did you use? Looks like 2" from the pictures. Where can you get low voltage rings for >1" diameter conduit?

It's actually 1.25". I think I picked up those Carlon LV rings at Home Depot or Lowes. They're obvious when you see them as they've got a set of concentric rings to punch out for the various sizes. Attached the conduit with a screw-coupler (PVC cemented to the Resigard) and a matching nut.


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