De-coupling Wall Mounted Speaker from Wall - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-30-2013, 09:15 PM - Thread Starter
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My room has been finished for a few years, but I recently upgraded my speakers. The new speakers are currently wall mounted (previous speakers had stands). The room is fairly quiet even with a single layer of drywall, as long as no speakers touched the wall, but now with the wall mounted speakers (one screw into the framing), the sound is traveling to the floor above. Any advice or ideas to maintain the wall mount feature, but to de-couple the speaker from the wall? If I can drop it even by 10 dB, that'd be great. In searching through posts, some ideas had come up with using neoprene or some other foam (neoprene washers?) between the mount and wall or to add something else (MDF with GG?) between the mount and wall, but no results. The speakers are AG Stradas, so not terribly large or heavy. I'd prefer to not put them on stands to keep the front of the room clear (I have small kids). Tearing down the drywall is a no-go (stands are cheaper).

Thoughts? Experiences? Please share. Thanks!
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post #2 of 9 Old 02-04-2013, 05:42 PM - Thread Starter
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Nobody seems to have any thoughts...

I'm going to try some padding, neoprene, or something spongy between the speaker and the wall to see how that helps. I'll post back if I find anything significant.
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post #3 of 9 Old 02-04-2013, 08:17 PM
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Option 1: Build a shelf and put the speaker on that. Use decoupling between the speaker and shelf
Option 2: Glue speaker to a decoupling layer, glue / attach decoupling layer to wall

Acoustic Frontiers: design and creation of high performance listening rooms, home theaters and project studios for discerning audio/video enthusiasts.
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post #4 of 9 Old 02-05-2013, 05:11 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nyal Mellor View Post

Option 1: Build a shelf and put the speaker on that. Use decoupling between the speaker and shelf
Option 2: Glue speaker to a decoupling layer, glue / attach decoupling layer to wall
Thanks for the idea. I had thought about Option 2- cutting MDF to the shape of the mount, then putting GG between that and the wall. However, how much vibration will travel through the screws (mount to MDF, MDF to drywall going through the GG)? Not much?

Thanks.
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post #5 of 9 Old 02-05-2013, 07:51 PM
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post #6 of 9 Old 02-06-2013, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patdeisa View Post

Thanks for the idea. I had thought about Option 2- cutting MDF to the shape of the mount, then putting GG between that and the wall. However, how much vibration will travel through the screws (mount to MDF, MDF to drywall going through the GG)? Not much?

Thanks.

Not GG, I don't think that will give you any useful isolation. Something like Auralex Platfoam...

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post #7 of 9 Old 02-06-2013, 12:07 PM
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Wood Technology makes something:

http://www.wood-tech.com/content/sound-chamber-2

My problems will start with the bass traps i plan around
corners, I will have to move surrounds anyway, so i may
use these.
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post #8 of 9 Old 02-16-2013, 06:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Update: I thought I'd try an easy/cheap solution to see how much it helps before diving deeper into changing out hardware, etc. I purchased some Sorbothane washers online for $20 (enough for the front 3 speakers). I tried to calculate how much pressure the mount would put on the washer, and chose the one that matched the best, ending up with 50 durometer washers. One of the websites said 30 or 50 durometer Sorbothane was best for acoustic insulation.

I removed each mount from the wall and placed the washers (4) between the mount and the wall, with the screws going through each. I tightened down the mount in a criss-cross pattern (like torquing wheels on a car), to get even compression of the washers (website says 3-20% compression). I then reattached the speakers and ran some preliminary tests.

So, do they work? Yes, somewhat. I think I'm getting about 6-8 dB extra loss with the washers, with a total 28 dB loss from my man cave to the room above (85 dB at listening position in-room with music, 57 dB standing in the room above with hardwood floors). I'm still tweaking the compression, which changes the absorption properties, but am thinking about longer screws, as the washer is about 1/6" when compressed, so I want to make sure there's adequate surface area for the screws to hold. I may get another dB or two with tweaks. At least, now when I stand at the open basement door, I hear the sound coming up the stairway (man cave at bottom of stairway), versus through the frame/flooring.

As for aesthetics, I can barely perceive the 1/6" gap between the mount and the wall, unless I'm right up against the wall, so no issues there.
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post #9 of 9 Old 02-16-2013, 07:21 AM
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I can't attest to how well this approach will work, because a) my basement isn't finished so there are other ways for the sound to travel upstairs and b) I haven't gone upstairs while the system was running to listen to the rear speakers, but last week I wall mounted my rear surrounds. I'm not a big fan of drilling holes in poured concrete, so I installed some "fake" studs to attach them to. Anyway, I was worried about vibration and how to isolate them, so I thought about the pads on the backs of the older style mousepads. I had an extra, so I used a mount as a pattern to cut out two segments and attached the mounts with that rubber between the mount and the stud.

Your solution sounds like a good approach as well. Good luck.

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