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post #31 of 50 Old 07-07-2013, 09:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for all your tips. What is the best way to mark where the furring channel will be on the drywall once it's up in the air so I hit the channel every time?

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post #32 of 50 Old 07-08-2013, 06:02 AM
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I rarely mark as the channels are sitting there plain as day as you put each piece up but if you have to mark use a pencil. Another trick is once you have the sheet up with 5-6 screws on the edges where you can easily judge the channel locations, you take your drill gun in one hand and a tape measure in the other and just press the drill bit into the dywall at the measured locations. That will give you a cross hair mark for the screws. Less time wasted putting your gun down and grabbing a pencil.
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post #33 of 50 Old 07-08-2013, 06:42 AM
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Drywalling is one of those tasks where you want to keep the screws, the tape measure, and your knife handy at all times.

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post #34 of 50 Old 07-08-2013, 07:16 AM
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Agreed.

I found the same when running electric. THAT'S when I bought my tool belt. There is always a philips OR a slotted screw driver you need, a different size head, a different length shaft, needle nose pliers, electricians pliers, electric tape, different size caps, wire cutters/strippers, etc etc etc.

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post #35 of 50 Old 07-09-2013, 04:07 PM - Thread Starter
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Got the first layer up on the ceiling and it looks good:) Screwed in to the furring channel about every 9 inches or so. I got to thinking, how do i screw the second layer up while missing the first layer of screws?

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post #36 of 50 Old 07-09-2013, 04:15 PM
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Easy - if the screw doesn't go in, move it an inch either way and you're good to go. Occasionally hitting other screws underneath is unavoidable.
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post #37 of 50 Old 07-09-2013, 05:15 PM
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Take consolation in the fact that you at least found the right spot!
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post #38 of 50 Old 07-11-2013, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Rent or purchase a drywall lift!!! Absolutely no substitute, I don't care how many friends you'd otherwise have helping you.

If you don't have a pro drywall screw gun with an automatic clutch, then there's a cheap alternative with a drywall screw "dimpler". Home Depot has a 5 pack of these things for cheap. Here is a fancier version: http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-D60498-Drywall-Dimpler-Phillips/dp/B0002EVG0W. It sets the screws perfectly and will help avoid some of the stripping issues BIG mentions.
what he said rent lift
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post #39 of 50 Old 07-29-2013, 07:17 PM - Thread Starter
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Got the first layer up with minimal sags due to not every seam hitting the furring channel. Caulked the ceiling perimeter and ready for the second layer. However, herein lies the problem. In order to get the furring channel up on the ceiling joists, I was unable despite my best efforts to get all of them spaced 24" OC. Two are, the rest are at varying widths. Is is ok to anchor what i can of the drywall to the furring and then screw what remains in to the first layer? I'd rather not cut each piece back to match each furring channel as this will drastically reduce my amount of drywall I will have left for the walls and cannot get 4x8 sheets down in the basement anymore. Is there some kind of thin brace I could use to anchor to? Thanks.

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post #40 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 08:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Anyone? Tried looking it up online but can't really find anything.

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post #41 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 03:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Bump

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post #42 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mijotter View Post

Got the first layer up with minimal sags due to not every seam hitting the furring channel. Caulked the ceiling perimeter and ready for the second layer. However, herein lies the problem. In order to get the furring channel up on the ceiling joists, I was unable despite my best efforts to get all of them spaced 24" OC. Two are, the rest are at varying widths. Is is ok to anchor what i can of the drywall to the furring and then screw what remains in to the first layer? I'd rather not cut each piece back to match each furring channel as this will drastically reduce my amount of drywall I will have left for the walls and cannot get 4x8 sheets down in the basement anymore. Is there some kind of thin brace I could use to anchor to? Thanks.

Not sure what you mean in some of your comments above, like in your first sentence, but I understand what you are asking regarding the second layer. Technically speaking, the butt joints of the second layer should come together on a furring channel, with each side of the butt joint being secured to the furring channel. While your 2nd layer of drywall will certainly not fall down on your head because it is secured in spots to your furring channel. Drywall screws require some "meat" in order to draw their heads securely into the drywall paper. This works with wood, but you can't get the bite with screwing drywall to drywall. The Green Glue will help keep everything together to some extent because of its adhesive properties, but I wouldn't rely on that as a permanent solution.

In short, do the best you can with securing it the proper way and controlling the scrap rates, but I would put the butt joints on the furring channels.
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post #43 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 04:19 PM
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I never worry about landing the butt joints or tapered joints on a channel and it has never been an issue, where you have a hanging joint secure it to the first layer with either course thread or laminating screws. You need to push hard on both the drywall and the screw and adjust your speed to get the screws to sink, but they will. Don't rely on the action of the screws to pull the layers tight, push like hell.
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post #44 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Don't rely on the action of the screws to pull the layers tight, push like hell.

Then where does the mechanical grip to draw (and keep) the layers tight together come from?
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post #45 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 05:22 PM
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The laminating screws will strip if you don't push hard. I think they basically hold the sheet in place, not snug it. You have to supply the pressure to snug it.

Although Green Glue is not marketed as "glue", if you've ever tried to separate two pieces of drywall wall with Green glue between them... there is no denying it has some adhesive properties smile.gif

I have one joint where I did that.. No ill effects. I did otherwise try to land the butt seams on a channel.

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post #46 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 06:32 PM
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The push like hell is to prevent the threads in the upper layer from stripping out and losing grip.

After 30 days two layers of drywall with green glue will not come apart, ever. The best you can do is strip the paper off one layer.
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post #47 of 50 Old 07-30-2013, 10:10 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies. What length screw do you recommend? I have some 2" Coarse thread drywall screws and 1 5/8" or should the screw not "pop" through the first layer?

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post #48 of 50 Old 07-31-2013, 07:53 AM
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Then where does the mechanical grip to draw (and keep) the layers tight together come from?

Wouldn't you want the second layer perpendicualr to the first? There should be plenty of screws into channel and the then the seams that don't fall on a channel would need to be screwed into first layer drywall only. Do ANY of the seams need to fall on channel? Wouldn't the scecond layer stop the first layer seams from sagging? It seem (seams?) to me that as long there are sufficient screws in the rest of the of field of the drywall it should stay put.

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post #49 of 50 Old 07-31-2013, 09:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

The push like hell is to prevent the threads in the upper layer from stripping out and losing grip.

After 30 days two layers of drywall with green glue will not come apart, ever. The best you can do is strip the paper off one layer.

I've done this for walls plenty of times but never on the ceiling where gravity is constantly tugging at the connection from the panel's own weight. It is difficult to balance the right amount of force needed with the drill vs. not stripping out the hole.
I have an old 1/2" OSB / GG / 5/8" drywall access panel cutout and I agree that although not promoted as an adhesive, that Green Glue absolutely has adhesive qualities, not to mention the pockets of suction it creates, much like trying to pull off a tile in wet mortar. The tricky bit is getting to that 30 day mark with no pull-off. Glad to hear you have had good success.
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Thanks for the replies. What length screw do you recommend? I have some 2" Coarse thread drywall screws and 1 5/8" or should the screw not "pop" through the first layer?

Provided the screw penetrates both layer, that is really all you would need ..... 1 1/4" minimum. But there is no harm in using 1 5/8" screws where the tip pops into free space beyond the second layer. But where you are going through both layers and into the furring channel you'll want 1/2" to 3/4" penetration through both drywall layers into the aluminum track with the fine thread gripper screws used with metal studs - so 2" screws would be fine.
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Wouldn't you want the second layer perpendicualr to the first? There should be plenty of screws into channel and the then the seams that don't fall on a channel would need to be screwed into first layer drywall only. Do ANY of the seams need to fall on channel? Wouldn't the scecond layer stop the first layer seams from sagging? It seem (seams?) to me that as long there are sufficient screws in the rest of the of field of the drywall it should stay put.

As long as you have a minimum 4" offset from seams in both directions, you are fine to run the sheet material in the same direction. Most will place the second layer over the first layer's long running seam at the midpoint so there is 24" of seam coverage in both directions and then advance the first sheet one or two studs (channels) to create the offset for the butt seams in the other direction.
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post #50 of 50 Old 07-31-2013, 09:13 AM - Thread Starter
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Yes the second layer will be perpendicular to the first, thus, parallel with the furring channel itself. So, out of the 4 foot width of the drywall, maybe at most a foot will be between furring channels, the entire 8 foot length. There will still be 2 rows of furring that the second layer 4x8 drywall piece will be screwed to though.

I wonder, would drywall anchors be good in this situation?

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