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Old 09-05-2013, 01:14 PM - Thread Starter
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That's my tv stand (rather, a picture of it that I found on the internet. Those cubbies in back are half open to allow easy access from the back of the unit. (You can kinda see the light pouring through in that picture) Basically, on the back of each cubby, on the bottom half of the back is a backing piece of wood--the top half of the back of the cubby is completely open. We use our ps3 (sitting on one of those cubbies) to stream most of what we watch. I've got plenty of 120mm pc case fans I could hook up in the back of the unit, but I don't know a good way to do so.

I'd like to just have it be on if whatever is in that cubby is on. I suppose I could get an arduino and hook a thermometer up to it and say if it gets so hot turn the fans on--but that seems kinda expensive since there are three cubbies and I'd want it individually controlled for each one. I've also never looked into using one of those fans outside of a mobo, but I'm sure I can find some dohicky somewhere to interface it with some other device.

That's just what I've got handy (minus spare arduinos). If there's some other way to accomplish this I'd love to hear it.

Also, sorry if this isn't the proper place for this question, it seemed like the most appropriate place on the forums judging by the title of this individual forum.

edit: in case it's not obvious, by cubby I mean the opening above the drawers. Google "hemnes tv stand" (from ikea) in case that picture isn't clear enough.
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Old 09-05-2013, 01:44 PM
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A 12v wall wart, a basic <$10 non-programable household thermostat and a 12v case fan can be put together to serve this purpose. You might need this setup for each of the cubbies however. The fan(s) wouldn't run based on whether the device in the cubby was hot but rather on the temperature of the air in the cubby. This is often desired because it will remove the hot air that lingers after the device has been shut off.

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Old 09-05-2013, 02:11 PM - Thread Starter
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That sounds like it's just what I need. Googling "wall wart" comes up with a ton of results. Is there a specific setup that's recommended (preferably with a link to a specific wall wart)?
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Old 09-05-2013, 02:37 PM
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I can't link you to a specific wall wart. But I can give you the below information that I wrote up for someone else on the same topic awhile back. It should get you most of what you need I think.


Get a basic thermostat. Something like this will work.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_155770-79-40135_0__?Ntt=155770&UserSearch=155770&productId=3167651&rpp=48

Get a 12v computer case fan. There are tons of choices for these... try and decide how much air you need to move in CFM and how quiet you need them to be. Often bigger fans are quieter for the same CFM as multiple smaller fans, but not always... Just play around with some options... more small fans vs fewer larger fans and vice versa. Depending on your setup you may have a size preference/limitation as well. Newegg has a lot to choose from:
http://www.newegg.com/Case-Fans/SubCategory/ID-573

Get a 12v DC wall wart. Steal it from an old piece of gear, buy it on ebay, or check your local Goodwill/thrift stores.. my closest Goodwill store used to keep a basket of nothing but wall warts for $1 each. I grabbed several 12v units of different amperages and called it a day for $3-4. You can also buy an old alarm clock or whatever just for the power supply... it's still a good deal imo.

The tricky part, if there is one, to this whole setup is to match your power supply and fan(s) power draw. You'll need to get a 12v DC wall wart that meets/exceeds the combined amperage rating for your fans. The wall wart should be marked with it's output in volts/amps. The fans are marked as well, but it's sometime harder to find online. I've had luck looking at the pictures in the Newegg listings. The amp current draw is usually marked in the middle of the fan. If you don't see it just move on to another fan or try Google for an answer on a specific model.

Once you get all the stuff you want to hook it up like this (I borrowed this off the internet... it's not my original drawing.




If you get partway into this and still have questions let me know and I'll try to help.

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Old 09-06-2013, 07:24 AM - Thread Starter
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I've never done much with electronics (while still trying to ensure that I know what I'm doing--I've definitely hooked random stuff up together before, lol), but I should definitely be able to do this. It looks like most case fans are from 10-20 mA. Are there really wall warts that don't support that much amperage?

edit: alright, first step down. Went to Good Will during lunch and found a single 12v ac adapter. Next step I'll go home and hope that my spare fans I've got laying around are 12v-it looks like most fans are, but I've never needed to pay attention to that part before and these are about 5 years old. Either way, fans are cheap enough that's not a big deal.

edit again: Hm, from looking at that diagram again, I see the circuit for the fan, but how does the thermometer have power to read the temperature without the fan being on? Does there not need to be one dedicated circuit for the thermometer and a conditional circuit for the fan? (this is probably just me not knowing enough about how the physical parts of technology work)
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:22 AM
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I'm sure you can find wall warts of all varying specifications. Just check your numbers on the fan and the power supply before you start connecting things.

I looked at newegg and found a few 120mm fans that ranged from .33A to .8A... That's 333 to 800 mA... I think you need to check your fan specs again.

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Old 09-06-2013, 10:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walterappleby View Post

I think you need to check your fan specs again.
Probably, I just glanced through a few and probably misinterpreted what I was seeing.
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