Help with basement theater - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 30 Old 11-25-2013, 09:17 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
All,

I recently moved to a new home and am currently putting together a home theater in my basement. I will be using JTR Quintuples as LCR for now and plan to move two of them for surround duty and one for rear surround duty in near future and get new LCRs from the Noesis line. I already have a JTR S2 sub.

I just bought a Denon AVR-4520CI and already have two Crown XLS-1500s for amplification.

I have also pre-ordered the new JVC X500 projector which should arrive by the 2nd week of December.

Here is the area layout:



The basement has drop ceilings (with white contoured 2' x 4' tiles) and was freshly painted (off white frown.gif). The ceiling is 7 feet 8 inches high.

The HT will be almost exclusively used for movie blu-rays and for streaming netflix movies.

I need help with:

1) Selecting a AT screen (currently thinking about getting a 110" or 115" fixed frame seymour AT screen with 16:9 aspect ratio but open for suggestions, not sure if I should consider other aspect ratios as well?). I would like to stay close to 1K for the screen but can go a little higher if needed.

2) I know that off white walls and white ceiling tiles are not good for HT but would like to avoid re-painting the whole basement. What other options do I have? Should I consider replacing ceiling tiles in the HT area with simple black/burgundy tiles or with acoustical tiles? If acoustical, which brands and materials are cheap and good? Should I install black/burgundy curtains or wall paper on the left, right and front walls? How about covering that area with GOM or similar cloth?

3) Acoustic treatments (with the usual flat FR at the MLP goal in mind): My initial thoughts are to install 3.5 or 4 " acoustic panels (from ATS or GIK) at first reflection points of LCRs and the back surround, and install a bass trap in each corner of the front wall, but I am very open to your suggestions smile.gif

4) If I sit about 11 feet from the screen, what's the optimal screen size and how far should the projector be ceiling mounted?

Truly appreciate your help!
logicators is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 30 Old 11-25-2013, 09:39 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jbrown15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Vancouver B.C.
Posts: 5,146
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Liked: 735
You should take a look at Falcon Screens, he offers a 115" diagonal 16:9 screen with a discount to AVS members for really close to your budget.
I'm also getting that exact same size screen and it's a little cheaper then the Seymour AV screen, and from what I've read the weaver is a little less noticeable them the XD material from Seymour.

I sit exactly 11.5' from my screen which is currently a 112" screen. I was sitting at 13.5' but changed the front of my room to a stage/false wall setup which brought the screen 24" closer to my seats. At first having it 24"s closer threw me off a little because I was so use to having it at 13.5', but once I got use to it I really like having it at 11.5'.

My Gear:

JTR Noesis 228HT (LCR)
Axiom Audio QS8 surrounds
Sherbourn PA 7-350
Pioneer VSX-21TXH
JVC RS45
Falcon Screens FVHD105
Dual PSA XS30's (gone but not forgotten)
jbrown15 is online now  
post #3 of 30 Old 11-25-2013, 10:53 PM
Advanced Member
 
Jedirun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 999
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by logicators View Post

All,

I recently moved to a new home and am currently putting together a home theater in my basement. I will be using JTR Quintuples as LCR for now and plan to move two of them for surround duty and one for rear surround duty in near future and get new LCRs from the Noesis line. I already have a JTR S2 sub.

I just bought a Denon AVR-4520CI and already have two Crown XLS-1500s for amplification.

I have also pre-ordered the new JVC X500 projector which should arrive by the 2nd week of December.

Here is the area layout:



The basement has drop ceilings (with white contoured 2' x 4' tiles) and was freshly painted (off white frown.gif). The ceiling is 7 feet 8 inches high.

The HT will be almost exclusively used for movie blu-rays and for streaming netflix movies.

I need help with:

1) Selecting a AT screen (currently thinking about getting a 110" or 115" fixed frame seymour AT screen with 16:9 aspect ratio but open for suggestions, not sure if I should consider other aspect ratios as well?). I would like to stay close to 1K for the screen but can go a little higher if needed.

2) I know that off white walls and white ceiling tiles are not good for HT but would like to avoid re-painting the whole basement. What other options do I have? Should I consider replacing ceiling tiles in the HT area with simple black/burgundy tiles or with acoustical tiles? If acoustical, which brands and materials are cheap and good? Should I install black/burgundy curtains or wall paper on the left, right and front walls? How about covering that area with GOM or similar cloth?

3) Acoustic treatments (with the usual flat FR at the MLP goal in mind): My initial thoughts are to install 3.5 or 4 " acoustic panels (from ATS or GIK) at first reflection points of LCRs and the back surround, and install a bass trap in each corner of the front wall, but I am very open to your suggestions smile.gif

4) If I sit about 11 feet from the screen, what's the optimal screen size and how far should the projector be ceiling mounted?

Truly appreciate your help!

Congratulations on your new thread and build.

I have a 113" Seymour AV Centerstage XD 16x9 screen and am very happy with it.

I have a lightly colored theater with white ceilings (see my signature for my build thread), but in a completely light controlled space and the picture does not suffer as much as I would have expected.

One option would be to darken just the front wall and and first couple of feet of the ceiling, either with paint or cloth. I believe that some companies make acoustic panels that will fit in your drop ceiling that you could use for the row closest to the screen. Your drop ceiling is probably already better than a standard ceiling for acoustics.

Your acoustic treatment plans seem to be sound. With the controlled dispersion of the Noesis, acoustic treatment is probably a little less important than with your quintuples.
Jedirun is offline  
post #4 of 30 Old 11-25-2013, 11:27 PM
Member
 
sendtobrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 105
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I think with the JVC you have lense memory which gives you the option to do 2:35 ratio without using an anamorphic lense. You might want to think about getting a 2:35 screen!
sendtobrit is offline  
post #5 of 30 Old 11-25-2013, 11:53 PM
AVS Special Member
 
coolgeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,552
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked: 75
Ask for a 2x2 sample of both the Falcon and XD screens.

Each have their strong points and I have yet to make a decision on which to get.

The falcon's weave is a little tighter and it completely disappears at about 8-10 feet (depending on your eyesight), while the XD disappears around 10-12 feet.

The XD is a little bit brighter, but the Falcon seems to have higher contrast. So, brightness vs contrast. So far on my own test materials, for stills (with colorful images like cotton balls, etc), the falson seems to shine, have much better saturations and higher contrast. However, once I play a movie (with moving objects), the XD seems brighter and have better skin tones...

That's my current test.. I'll have to test further before making a decision...
coolgeek is offline  
post #6 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 06:39 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
All,

Thanks for your quick responses!

jbrown5 and coolgeek: I will take a look at Falcon screens and compare with seymour offerings

jedirun: Yes I saw some 4x2 panels from ATS and GIK. The pre-made panels seem expensive. They are both selling Owens Corning OC 703 for a lot less, but some people don't seem to like them because of chemicals used to manufacture them. Not sure what the best route is? I also started reading threads about cloth people use to cover the front and side walls

sendtobrit: Thanks for bringing that feature to my attention smile.gif I don't have any experience with the 2.35:1 format. Do you know if most blurays are in that format? How about Netflix streaming?
logicators is offline  
post #7 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 08:03 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jbrown15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Vancouver B.C.
Posts: 5,146
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Liked: 735
You should take a look at these guys for bass traps and acoustical panels, they seem to have very reasonable prices and even sell them in kits if you don't mind assembling them yourself to save a little.
http://www.acoustimac.com/
They are also have a black Friday sale this week with an additional 15% of their DMD acoustical panels.

My Gear:

JTR Noesis 228HT (LCR)
Axiom Audio QS8 surrounds
Sherbourn PA 7-350
Pioneer VSX-21TXH
JVC RS45
Falcon Screens FVHD105
Dual PSA XS30's (gone but not forgotten)
jbrown15 is online now  
post #8 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 11:05 AM
Member
 
KickinAces's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

Quick question for you acoustic guru's.  Completely showing my ignorance here, but how do you determine where the reflection points are and where to place the acoustic panels.  I am still in the planning/construction phase of my HT and trying to get as many answers as possible.  I have said before that the more I learn, the more questions I have!  Thanks for all the input you may have.

 

I am looking at the Seymour XD and building it myself.  I like the instructions they give and have read a lot of positive reviews.  For me, painting isn't too terrible, so if it was my room, I would probably repaint the walls.  The current room I am working on building had a drop white ceiling and panel walls.  I have ripped all of that down and am decoupling the ceiling (walls already built 1'' away from foundation).  I personally like the look of drywall so the work is worth it to me.

KickinAces is offline  
post #9 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 12:07 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
SierraMikeBravo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 1,402
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 29
The typical response you will get is to drag a mirror along the wall and when you see the speaker in the mirror add treatment to that location. Most responses will say to add some sort of absorption. The method isn't the issue, but the solution is in my opinion. Treating a room is just as much art as science. There are many different types of treatment, and I would experiment to some degree to see what's sounds best for you.

Shawn Byrne
Erskine Group
HAA Design Certified -THX Certified Professional

Design-Video & Audio Calibration Information

The original Pro Theater Layout
SierraMikeBravo is offline  
post #10 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 04:21 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
What do you guys think of these tiles?

http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=89091-61-2906BL&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=3559222&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=req&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

They claim 70% noise reduction and a 70% light reflection rating (I have no clue if that's good or bad?).
logicators is offline  
post #11 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 06:24 PM
Advanced Member
 
Jedirun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 999
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 41
I can't get the link to open on my phone, but the 70% noise reduction sounds good. You won't have all that much in the way of ceiling reflections to deal with with the Noesis anyway.
Jedirun is offline  
post #12 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 06:42 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,529
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
Liked: 537
when they make a claim of reducing sound 70% you really need to look at the data by frequency. Most sound reduction ceiling panels may have a stated average reduction that sounds great. Problem is at lower frequencies such as the sub-woofer rumble of an action movie the reduction will drop way down, maybe 5-10% at best. There are no cheap quick fixes in containing the sound in a theater. You need Mass, Mechanical Isolation, Absorption and Dampening all working together to achieve stellar results.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #13 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 07:01 PM
Member
 
KickinAces's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

While I am by no means an expert, and still building my own HT from scratch, everything I have read makes me think those panels will not work out as well as you would like.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

when they make a claim of reducing sound 70% you really need to look at the data by frequency. Most sound reduction ceiling panels may have an stated average reduction that sounds great. Problem is at lower frequncies such as the subwoofer rumble of an action movie the reduction will drop way down, maybe 5-10% at best. There are no cheap quick fixes in containing the sound in a theater. You need Mass, Mechanical Isolation, Absorption and Dampening all working together to achieve stellar results.

 

+1 to this based on talking with sound proof companies and reading various threads.  I am running into the same problem with sound isolation.  Considering building a room within the room, but still working out details.  As I said in earlier post, I had drop ceilings, but didn't have much faith in their ability in sound proof or the look of it.  My problem is how to make sure walls and ceilings are secure if they are not attached/secured to anything else.  Not even sure if you can nail them to the floor since mine is concrete.

 

My thought is if you are really determined to keep the drop ceiling, try putting GG and DD on the subfloor above the ceiling and have insulation between that and the drop ceiling as much as possible.  Again, no expert, just compiling what I have understood from other threads and websites.  Good luck with everything!

KickinAces is offline  
post #14 of 30 Old 11-26-2013, 08:24 PM
Advanced Member
 
Jedirun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 999
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Logicators,

BIGmouthinDC really knows his stuff, so is an excellent resource, but if you are not looking for sound isolation, just acoustic treatment to reduce resonance and boomy bass, I think the drop ceiling is an excellent opportunity for a huge bass trap in your ceiling.

I bought a bunch of Black CertaPro Acoustaboard panels in the classifieds a few years ago that I ended up making into bass traps behind my screen, but it is designed to be used in a drop ceiling. I think that something like that plus insulation between that and the floor could make big difference in clean bass.
Jedirun is offline  
post #15 of 30 Old 11-27-2013, 02:08 AM
AVS Special Member
 
coolgeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,552
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked: 75
Have anyone used the riser as a giant bass trap? (If you don't have enough space at the back of the room)
coolgeek is offline  
post #16 of 30 Old 11-27-2013, 04:11 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,529
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
Liked: 537
Yes, It is a feature of nearly every Erskine designed theater. There are threads on just that topic.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #17 of 30 Old 11-27-2013, 05:31 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
BIGmouthinDC and Jedirun: My primary reason for replacing ceiling tiles is to change the ceiling color to black in the theater area smile.gif Sound isolation is not super important, but I would love to get tiles that may improve the sound quality (reduce resonance etc). I don't expect those armstrong tiles to do much below 200 Hz (they have a NRC rating of 0.7 and even ceiling tiles with a rating of 0.95 or 1 seems to do very little with bass frequencies). I am interested in these tiles because they are cheaper than tiles sold at acoustic sites, and lowes sells them. But it seems like they are not available in local stores and the order will take 40 days which sucks!

I couldn't find the price on Black CertaPro Acoustaboard panels online but will continue searching. Worst case, should I consider painting the current ceiling tiles in the theater black and adding some insulation above them? Going DIY for ceiling panels seems like another alternative.

KickInAces: I know GG but what is DD?
logicators is offline  
post #18 of 30 Old 11-27-2013, 05:47 AM
Member
 
KickinAces's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

DD = double drywall

 

And I believe I saw similar tiles on sale this weekend at either home depot or menards, if those are near you, for 49 cents each.  Might be worth looking at.

KickinAces is offline  
post #19 of 30 Old 11-27-2013, 09:20 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by KickinAces View Post

DD = double drywall

 

And I believe I saw similar tiles on sale this weekend at either home depot or menards, if those are near you, for 49 cents each.  Might be worth looking at.


I will check Home Depot, no Menards here. Thanks for the heads up!
logicators is offline  
post #20 of 30 Old 11-29-2013, 11:59 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
All,

I could not find any black ceiling tiles locally and it turned out that my current drop ceiling tiles are acoustical with a NRC rating of 0.55.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/USG-Ceilings-Fifth-Avenue-2-ft-x-4-ft-Lay-in-Ceiling-Tile-8-Pack-280/203628166#.UpjwSMRDv-s

I am thinking of buying triple black velvet from syfabric to cover the current tiles (in the theater area not the whole basement, i.e., from the front wall to the recliners, about 21 or 28 tiles) and paint the corresponding visible areas of the ceiling grid black. Does anyone see a problem with it? I would like to avoid a situation where I resolve the picture quality issues but create significant sound quality problems.

If the combination of these tiles and velvet would result in too much high frequency absorption would adding bass traps in the corners and side walls improve the situation?

Also, what are the implications of covering left, right and front walls with the same velvet (left wall from the front wall to the seating area, and right wall from the front wall to the opening)?

Thanks in advance for all your help!
logicators is offline  
post #21 of 30 Old 11-30-2013, 08:46 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
SierraMikeBravo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 1,402
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 29
What are you trying to accomplish? You need to define that first before purchasing or making decisions on anything. Second, those tiles are not going to do anything for you isolation or acoustic wise. They are meant for office buildings to reduce the amount of voice carry through the ceiling plenum to adjacent rooms and reflection of concrete or steel floor/roofing . Therefore, they are most effective for the speech frequency range at normal speech levels say 50-60 dB at most.

Shawn Byrne
Erskine Group
HAA Design Certified -THX Certified Professional

Design-Video & Audio Calibration Information

The original Pro Theater Layout
SierraMikeBravo is offline  
post #22 of 30 Old 12-01-2013, 07:56 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
The basement is all painted off white, with white ceiling tiles. That will adversely impact the image quality (which is what I am primarily trying to address), but I would like to avoid doing it in a way that will hurt the sound quality in the room.

Covering the ceiling tiles in the theater area with Triple Black Velvet and painting the corresponding grid sections should improve the image quality in the theater area, but I was concerned that by doing that the ceiling may absorb most of the high frequencies and make the bass boomy. Is that a valid concern? If yes, can I add bass traps in the corners to fix it?

Isolation is not a major concern for me.
logicators is offline  
post #23 of 30 Old 12-01-2013, 08:58 AM
Advanced Member
 
Jedirun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 999
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Having too much high frequency absorption will not affect the bass. Covering the tiles will not give you too much high frequency absorption anyway. The bottom line is that the covering the ceiling tiles should help the image quality and should not hurt the sound and you will need bass traps whether you do it or not.
Jedirun is offline  
post #24 of 30 Old 12-01-2013, 10:02 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
Cool smile.gif

I will add bass traps and acoustic panels as well.

Regarding the walls: I have convinced the family to paint the side walls in the theater area black, which is probably the cheapest and simplest solution. Any recommendations on a flat non reflective black paint that doesn't easily get stained? Multiple threads on AVS seem to compare Rosco supersaturated velour black with Benjamin Moore F215-80 and Behr Mouse Ears but they are all a bit dated.
logicators is offline  
post #25 of 30 Old 12-01-2013, 05:37 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
SierraMikeBravo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 1,402
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Whoa! Oh yes it will affect sound. Absorbing high frequencies is a significant problem in most theaters. This will further add to that issue. Adding bass traps will only create further problems unless those problems existed in the first place. By absorbing high frequencies, all you will do is create a dead room. Best solution in this scenario is just paint the tiles. Rosco supersaturated black would work well. It gives the appearance of a velour.

Shawn Byrne
Erskine Group
HAA Design Certified -THX Certified Professional

Design-Video & Audio Calibration Information

The original Pro Theater Layout
SierraMikeBravo is offline  
post #26 of 30 Old 12-01-2013, 08:08 PM
Advanced Member
 
Jedirun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 999
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraMikeBravo View Post

Whoa! Oh yes it will affect sound. Absorbing high frequencies is a significant problem in most theaters. This will further add to that issue. Adding bass traps will only create further problems unless those problems existed in the first place. By absorbing high frequencies, all you will do is create a dead room. Best solution in this scenario is just paint the tiles. Rosco supersaturated black would work well. It gives the appearance of a velour.
So you are saying that even with the side walls untreated, covering the ceiling tiles in fabric will cause too much high frequency absorption? I would not have thought that a layer of fabric would do much of anything. I am not challenging you, just trying to learn. Can you expand on this a little? Thanks
Jedirun is offline  
post #27 of 30 Old 12-02-2013, 06:31 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
SierraMikeBravo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 1,402
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedirun View Post

So you are saying that even with the side walls untreated, covering the ceiling tiles in fabric will cause too much high frequency absorption? I would not have thought that a layer of fabric would do much of anything. I am not challenging you, just trying to learn. Can you expand on this a little? Thanks

I am not saying it will cause too much high frequency absorption, I am saying it will affect the sound in the room greatly. Two largest surfaces in the room by area are the floor and ceiling. General rule of thumb in echo chambers (rooms with a lot of hard surfaces), is to the either the floor or the ceiling. Usually not both. We often treat opposing surfaces when it comes to the floor or ceiling. If you have a carpeted surface, then that usually takes care of that. On a first order. Now, enter the speakers, depending on the characteristics and dispersion patterns of those speakers, then the ceiling MAY need to be treated for anomalies associated with that speaker which usually shows up in an energy time graph. Now, RT is often said not to have an effect in small rooms. I say yes and no on that. You can absorb too much and you can also not treat enough. It often matters where you treat for something and with what. Broadbrushing with the exception of the carpet is generally not a good idea. Killing high frequency in a room will likely result in a poor sounding room, and believe it or not, I usually try to keep my high frequency mostly near the ceilings on the side walls. It keeps the sparkle in the room best near the ceilings. I tend to keep my absorption near the floor.

Shawn Byrne
Erskine Group
HAA Design Certified -THX Certified Professional

Design-Video & Audio Calibration Information

The original Pro Theater Layout
SierraMikeBravo is offline  
post #28 of 30 Old 12-02-2013, 07:56 PM
Advanced Member
 
Jedirun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 999
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraMikeBravo View Post

I am not saying it will cause too much high frequency absorption, I am saying it will affect the sound in the room greatly. Two largest surfaces in the room by area are the floor and ceiling. General rule of thumb in echo chambers (rooms with a lot of hard surfaces), is to the either the floor or the ceiling. Usually not both. We often treat opposing surfaces when it comes to the floor or ceiling. If you have a carpeted surface, then that usually takes care of that. On a first order. Now, enter the speakers, depending on the characteristics and dispersion patterns of those speakers, then the ceiling MAY need to be treated for anomalies associated with that speaker which usually shows up in an energy time graph. Now, RT is often said not to have an effect in small rooms. I say yes and no on that. You can absorb too much and you can also not treat enough. It often matters where you treat for something and with what. Broadbrushing with the exception of the carpet is generally not a good idea. Killing high frequency in a room will likely result in a poor sounding room, and believe it or not, I usually try to keep my high frequency mostly near the ceilings on the side walls. It keeps the sparkle in the room best near the ceilings. I tend to keep my absorption near the floor.
Thank you. Can you give your recommendation of the best general strategy for the thread starter? By the way the speakers he is getting only have 40 degrees of vertical dispersion and may not have that much in the way of interaction with the ceiling in the first place. His current speakers have 90 degree coverage.
Jedirun is offline  
post #29 of 30 Old 12-03-2013, 08:27 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
logicators's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
Thank you both for your help. I will wait to hear from Shawn on the general RT strategy.

I have ordered a gallon of the Rosco paint, a 125" diagonal scope XD screen from Seymour in the economy frame (I was originally planning to go with a 115" but Chris@Seymour convinced me to go bigger smile.gif), and have also ordered some black GOM FR701 for the screen wall.

I have also decided to build a sliding or fold-able temporary wall using home depot door panels to better isolate the theater area (but still have the flexibility to open up most of the wall if needed). Here is the revised plan:



I will be painting the side walls from the front down to to the sitting area black but not the whole left side of the basement (a compromise to keep the family happy smile.gif).
logicators is offline  
post #30 of 30 Old 12-04-2013, 06:35 AM
 
chucakievee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10

I like the instructions they give and have read a lot of positive reviews.  For me, painting isn't too terrible, so if it was my room, I would probably repaint the walls.  The current room I am working on building had a drop white ceiling and panel walls.  

chucakievee is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off