Advice on riser and cable run - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 12-16-2013, 09:54 PM - Thread Starter
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Hey all,

I'm building out my first theater. Really, I am taking an existing room and adding a riser and nice couches. smile.gif

At any rate, I am planning on building a riser, and I need a bit of advice on the riser and running some cables for the surround speakers. The cable I have is 12 Gauge cable, one for each speaker. (Red and black in each)

Cables:
I am not opening up the walls, this is a renovation not a complete build out. We have an open wall that is 48 inches high that is open to the kitchen. Look at the top of the wall as the kitchen floor. See the below pticure



At any rate, the riser and back row of seats will go against that back wall, and the cables will run down the left (as you look at the couch) side of the wall. (The blue tarp is a sliding glass door) Since I can't open the walls, the only course I have is to run them on the floor. The floor will have carpet, and a good sealed and thick pad, but not very thick carpet. There is a 1/2 inch gap under the drywall, where the cables can tuck in nicely. The problem I have is determining whether or not to add a conduit to the riser. Or, just run them along the bottom of the wall and build the riser around them, knowing that I won't be able to pull them out again after. My concern (really, my wife's concern) is visibility of the cables and aesthetics. How can I get the cables into the riser (with carpet) and still make it look clean and professional?

The other question for cables...is there a way to run them next to a sliding glass door that is clean and protected. They will be covered with carpet, but there is no gap like running along the drywall. I'm hoping...the pad is thick enough that I can cut a channel in the pad that will prevent any bumps. Thoughts?


Riser,

As for the riser, I am building a 2x10 riser, and it will be filled with insulation. I'm not worried as much about sound control since the room is open to other areas of the house. I just want solid construction. I see that some people add either one or two layers of plywood for the floor. Is the second layer necessary? I plan on using 3/4 plywood. Width will be from the left wall to the right wall which is just over 10 feet (10' 2"). Is the second layer used for sound control or beefier construction.

I thank you in advance for your advice.
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post #2 of 10 Old 12-16-2013, 10:50 PM
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pull off the trim. Run behind the floor trim, over the sliding door, back down, then through the riser when you get there. When you put the trim back up, the wires are covered. I assume the riser is wall-to-wall.
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post #3 of 10 Old 12-17-2013, 03:18 AM - Thread Starter
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Yes, wall to wall.

Baseboards are already off the walls and doors. The cabling being 12 gauge is pretty thick at about 3/8" I don't think it will work well behind base boards of the door.
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post #4 of 10 Old 12-17-2013, 05:08 AM
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get your utility knife out and cut a grove in the drywall for the wires that will be behind the case molding of the doors. You cut holes in the riser to run wires. easy to do while you are building it. You also don't need the riser framing tight to the wall so you can leave a gap at the back if you want. Just make the decking tight
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post #5 of 10 Old 12-17-2013, 09:07 PM - Thread Starter
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I'll look at that.

What about the second layer of plywood on the riser that some people add....structure\best practice or overkill and\or sound control?
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post #6 of 10 Old 12-18-2013, 04:13 AM
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I actually just finished a three layer riser yesterday with green glue between layers. 24 sheets total. Each layer makes it quieter and quieter. Two layers of 3/4 material is just fine. Three layers of 5/8 is a little finer. If you build a riser with a single layer it tends to act like a drum when you walk on it. Fill with insulation and leave a lip to make carpeting easier. I round over the leading edge with a router. Anything over 8 inches requires a step, but I've seen violations due to space limitations.
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post #7 of 10 Old 12-18-2013, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rikketyrik View Post

Hey all,

I'm building out my first theater. Really, I am taking an existing room and adding a riser and nice couches. smile.gif

At any rate, I am planning on building a riser, and I need a bit of advice on the riser and running some cables for the surround speakers. The cable I have is 12 Gauge cable, one for each speaker. (Red and black in each)

Cables:
I am not opening up the walls, this is a renovation not a complete build out. We have an open wall that is 48 inches high that is open to the kitchen. Look at the top of the wall as the kitchen floor.
I thank you in advance for your advice.

Run extra. Run what you have room for. Run extra speaker cables, some network cable, etc. You never know when you might want to upgrade to 7.1 or 9.2 or 17.9, or add a sub in the back, or some new control panel will come out and you'll want an ethernet cable run from your rack to your seating.

I love my iPhone, but it will never replace my turntable.

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post #8 of 10 Old 12-21-2013, 07:45 AM - Thread Starter
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Ok, that makes sense for the extra layers. I'll start with what I have and bump up a layer if I need to. I do have some height limitations though, due to lower wall in the back. I have enough R30 to fill up the riser as well.
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post #9 of 10 Old 12-21-2013, 07:32 PM - Thread Starter
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What are people doing about stud width? I'm seeing a mix of 16 on center and 12 on center. I thought of 12 on center, but then saw so many 16 on center jobs, I went with that.
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post #10 of 10 Old 12-22-2013, 05:14 PM
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I'm using 16" stud spacing, with clips and channel. Pretty standard spacing. If you don't need the structural strength (as in staggered stud, or room-withiin-a-room construction), 24" spacing would probably be fine.
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