Soundproofing master thread - Page 17 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 14Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #481 of 794 Old 05-31-2014, 01:35 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ellisr63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Northern California, In the HT
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Liked: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Dryer ducting that runs in concealed spaces should be metal to reduce the chance of a fire being spread via the duct. It also needs to be sturdy enough to withstand the insertion and operation of a lint clean-out brush along the entire route. Try to avoid tight bends. You could add damped mass to the outside of the duct to minimize sound transfer, Like Dynamat Extreme. You can add some insulation, and while I think Fiberglass is OK to be on the safe side you could surround it with Roxul.
Sounds good. The only tight bend will be the 90 degree it has to do when it comes out of the wall to go into the soffit. We will stick with the whole run being metal, and I will lookinto dynamat or something similar to see how expensive it will be... Otherwise I will go with insulation, and double drywall with green glue.

Denon 4520ci, (3) JBL 2360As/EV DHA-1s, (3) 1/4 Pie bass bins, MiniDSP 2x4s, (4) Klipsch HIPs, (2) Klipsch KP3002s, PS3, XBox 360, (3) Intel NUCs, Monoprice Redmere, Monster HTPS7000, 2 SUPER SPUD subs, Panasonic AE8000us SeymourAV 180 (195" diagonal) scope screen, Yamaha P7000s (for the subs), (2) Yamaha P2500s amps for the front (3) bass bins.
ellisr63 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #482 of 794 Old 05-31-2014, 01:57 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 21,559
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 607 Post(s)
Liked: 746
Take a look at this bend:

http://www.dryer-ell.com/welcome_dryerell.htm
ellisr63 likes this.
BIGmouthinDC is offline  
post #483 of 794 Old 05-31-2014, 02:27 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ellisr63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Northern California, In the HT
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Liked: 252
Thanks
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Take a look at this bend:

http://www.dryer-ell.com/welcome_dryerell.htm
Thanks, I will see how much room we have to do it that way. I wish the dryer vent could go through the floor as it would give us more room for the curve.

Denon 4520ci, (3) JBL 2360As/EV DHA-1s, (3) 1/4 Pie bass bins, MiniDSP 2x4s, (4) Klipsch HIPs, (2) Klipsch KP3002s, PS3, XBox 360, (3) Intel NUCs, Monoprice Redmere, Monster HTPS7000, 2 SUPER SPUD subs, Panasonic AE8000us SeymourAV 180 (195" diagonal) scope screen, Yamaha P7000s (for the subs), (2) Yamaha P2500s amps for the front (3) bass bins.
ellisr63 is offline  
post #484 of 794 Old 06-01-2014, 09:25 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
A soundproof sliding barn door?

I wonder if it's possible to make a reasonably decent soundproof door in a sliding barn door form. The key problem would be the seals, since those type of doors are typically completely loose on the sides and bottoms and only hanging off of rollers on the top. Having it being even remotely soundproof would require it to somehow seal itself when it was shut.

Has this ever been done? If so, what are the details?

An example:
Barn door
ellisr63 likes this.
granroth is offline  
post #485 of 794 Old 06-06-2014, 07:17 PM
Senior Member
 
panino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Indy
Posts: 230
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Liked: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post

A soundproof sliding barn door?

I wonder if it's possible to make a reasonably decent soundproof door in a sliding barn door form. The key problem would be the seals, since those type of doors are typically completely loose on the sides and bottoms and only hanging off of rollers on the top. Having it being even remotely soundproof would require it to somehow seal itself when it was shut.

Has this ever been done? If so, what are the details?

 

 

Definitely haven't done this, but it sounds like a fun challenge.  What about designing the track so that as the door slides closed it also makes the door come a little closer to the door frame/jamb? e.g. a track not quite parallel to the door frame.  Sort of like a wedge effect  Incorporating some seals along the door frame near the casing would then engage the door as it slides closed and wedges a little closer to the frame.  As for the bottom of the door, you could probably install an automatic door bottom that would engage when the door hits the end of the track.  Those doors are pretty heavy... the weight of the door should theoretically keep it quite snug against the seals once they are touching.

 

Are you actually building one of these?

panino is online now  
post #486 of 794 Old 06-06-2014, 08:26 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ellisr63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Northern California, In the HT
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Liked: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post

A soundproof sliding barn door?

I wonder if it's possible to make a reasonably decent soundproof door in a sliding barn door form. The key problem would be the seals, since those type of doors are typically completely loose on the sides and bottoms and only hanging off of rollers on the top. Having it being even remotely soundproof would require it to somehow seal itself when it was shut.

Has this ever been done? If so, what are the details?

An example:
Barn door
I think you could do it if you put seals all around the door opening and then put a crank type door mechanism that pulled the door in tight as it sealed it... Maybe similar to this but going from side to side.

Denon 4520ci, (3) JBL 2360As/EV DHA-1s, (3) 1/4 Pie bass bins, MiniDSP 2x4s, (4) Klipsch HIPs, (2) Klipsch KP3002s, PS3, XBox 360, (3) Intel NUCs, Monoprice Redmere, Monster HTPS7000, 2 SUPER SPUD subs, Panasonic AE8000us SeymourAV 180 (195" diagonal) scope screen, Yamaha P7000s (for the subs), (2) Yamaha P2500s amps for the front (3) bass bins.
ellisr63 is offline  
post #487 of 794 Old 06-06-2014, 11:32 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by panino View Post

Definitely haven't done this, but it sounds like a fun challenge.  What about designing the track so that as the door slides closed it also makes the door come a little closer to the door frame/jamb? e.g. a track not quite parallel to the door frame.  Sort of like a wedge effect  Incorporating some seals along the door frame near the casing would then engage the door as it slides closed and wedges a little closer to the frame.  As for the bottom of the door, you could probably install an automatic door bottom that would engage when the door hits the end of the track.  Those doors are pretty heavy... the weight of the door should theoretically keep it quite snug against the seals once they are touching.

Hmm... that's an idea. The fact that they weigh so much also makes me think of a modified idea -- what if I put gaskets all the way around the door opening and then assume that whoever opens or closes the door will do so by essentially pulling it "out", first. That is, the door essentially acts like a pendulum since it pivots only on the top rail. If you have to pull it away from the wall slightly just to move it, then that could "disengage" it from the gaskets.

Using an auto door bottom is an interesting idea, as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by panino View Post

Are you actually building one of these?

Well, I am absolutely going to be building a sliding barn door for the outer door of my theater. It's a WAF requirement. Given that hard requirement, I'm trying to think of a way that I could also make it as soundproof as possible -- just as extra gravy. This'll all be after most of the rest of the theater is done, though (still months and months away).
granroth is offline  
post #488 of 794 Old 06-06-2014, 11:34 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellisr63 View Post

I think you could do it if you put seals all around the door opening and then put a crank type door mechanism that pulled the door in tight as it sealed it... Maybe similar to this but going from side to side.

Heh, yeah, something like this could potentially work... but there's NO WAY I could get that to fly with my wife. She wants it to look just like a barn door and the farther I deviate from that, the more likely it ain't gunna happen.
ellisr63 likes this.
granroth is offline  
post #489 of 794 Old 06-06-2014, 11:53 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ellisr63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Northern California, In the HT
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Liked: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post

Heh, yeah, something like this could potentially work... but there's NO WAY I could get that to fly with my wife. She wants it to look just like a barn door and the farther I deviate from that, the more likely it ain't gunna happen.
What if you made it like a barn door... But when it slides into position the track moves it closer to seal it? We wanted a rustic look on ours, and we did this...

Denon 4520ci, (3) JBL 2360As/EV DHA-1s, (3) 1/4 Pie bass bins, MiniDSP 2x4s, (4) Klipsch HIPs, (2) Klipsch KP3002s, PS3, XBox 360, (3) Intel NUCs, Monoprice Redmere, Monster HTPS7000, 2 SUPER SPUD subs, Panasonic AE8000us SeymourAV 180 (195" diagonal) scope screen, Yamaha P7000s (for the subs), (2) Yamaha P2500s amps for the front (3) bass bins.
ellisr63 is offline  
post #490 of 794 Old 06-07-2014, 04:41 PM
Senior Member
 
panino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Indy
Posts: 230
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Liked: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post


Heh, yeah, something like this could potentially work... but there's NO WAY I could get that to fly with my wife. She wants it to look just like a barn door and the farther I deviate from that, the more likely it ain't gunna happen.

 

 

 

What about something like this, but you can mount the barn door on the front of the metal door?   :D

 

1280px-WinonaSavingsBankVault.JPG

ellisr63 and granroth like this.
panino is online now  
post #491 of 794 Old 06-07-2014, 04:48 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ellisr63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Northern California, In the HT
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Liked: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post

A soundproof sliding barn door?

I wonder if it's possible to make a reasonably decent soundproof door in a sliding barn door form. The key problem would be the seals, since those type of doors are typically completely loose on the sides and bottoms and only hanging off of rollers on the top. Having it being even remotely soundproof would require it to somehow seal itself when it was shut.

Has this ever been done? If so, what are the details?

An example:
Barn door
I think if you bend the top bar to make the door move closer to the door opening you could do it. It would look 100% like a sliding barn door ... It would just slide in to seal the opening when shut.
granroth likes this.

Denon 4520ci, (3) JBL 2360As/EV DHA-1s, (3) 1/4 Pie bass bins, MiniDSP 2x4s, (4) Klipsch HIPs, (2) Klipsch KP3002s, PS3, XBox 360, (3) Intel NUCs, Monoprice Redmere, Monster HTPS7000, 2 SUPER SPUD subs, Panasonic AE8000us SeymourAV 180 (195" diagonal) scope screen, Yamaha P7000s (for the subs), (2) Yamaha P2500s amps for the front (3) bass bins.
ellisr63 is offline  
post #492 of 794 Old 06-07-2014, 05:22 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by panino View Post



What about something like this, but you can mount the barn door on the front of the metal door?   biggrin.gif

1280px-WinonaSavingsBankVault.JPG

Hah! Yeah, I refer to the main theater door that'll be built as a "bank vault" style door (multiple layers), but doing so almost seems like an insult compared to the real thing! tongue.gif
granroth is offline  
post #493 of 794 Old 06-09-2014, 12:29 PM
AVS Special Member
 
cw5billwade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: GA
Posts: 1,488
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
Liked: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post

Well, I am absolutely going to be building a sliding barn door for the outer door of my theater. It's a WAF requirement. Given that hard requirement, I'm trying to think of a way that I could also make it as soundproof as possible -- just as extra gravy. This'll all be after most of the rest of the theater is done, though (still months and months away).
I saw a build where they bought a sliding door that did just that it snaped into place at the end of the track I just can't find it now. I think the door came that way nothing they had to jurry rig. I will look some more.
cw5billwade is offline  
post #494 of 794 Old 06-09-2014, 05:27 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post

I saw a build where they bought a sliding door that did just that it snaped into place at the end of the track I just can't find it now. I think the door came that way nothing they had to jurry rig. I will look some more.

Yeah, I may be thinking of the same one. Was it a false bookcase or something?

Thing is, I read so many build threads that they all run together and I don't know if something happened recently or five years ago rolleyes.gif
granroth is offline  
post #495 of 794 Old 06-09-2014, 09:29 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ellisr63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Northern California, In the HT
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Liked: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post

Yeah, I may be thinking of the same one. Was it a false bookcase or something?

Thing is, I read so many build threads that they all run together and I don't know if something happened recently or five years ago rolleyes.gif
There was a guy in Sweden that did a sliding door, but his was like a vault door and it was like 12" thick. He had a custom latch mechanism on it too... I am not sure if that is the one you are thinking of or not.

Denon 4520ci, (3) JBL 2360As/EV DHA-1s, (3) 1/4 Pie bass bins, MiniDSP 2x4s, (4) Klipsch HIPs, (2) Klipsch KP3002s, PS3, XBox 360, (3) Intel NUCs, Monoprice Redmere, Monster HTPS7000, 2 SUPER SPUD subs, Panasonic AE8000us SeymourAV 180 (195" diagonal) scope screen, Yamaha P7000s (for the subs), (2) Yamaha P2500s amps for the front (3) bass bins.
ellisr63 is offline  
post #496 of 794 Old 06-09-2014, 11:21 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
This was the one I was thinking of: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1339780/another-erskine-designed-masterpiece-if-i-dont-screw-it-up/400_100#post_24424843

And the video of the mechanism in action:

I don't think I'd be able to use that mechanism as-is, since it opens "in" and I need one that opens "out". Plus, it's intended for hidden doors. And it's $900 for the mechanism alone! HOWEVER, the close-up at 25 seconds gives me the idea that what I need is TWO tracks and I can do roughly the same but in reverse. This would almost surely work if I learn better metal working skills than I currently have.
granroth is offline  
post #497 of 794 Old 06-10-2014, 06:04 AM
AVS Special Member
 
cw5billwade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: GA
Posts: 1,488
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
Liked: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellisr63 View Post

There was a guy in Sweden that did a sliding door, but his was like a vault door and it was like 12" thick. He had a custom latch mechanism on it too... I am not sure if that is the one you are thinking of or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post

This was the one I was thinking of: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1339780/another-erskine-designed-masterpiece-if-i-dont-screw-it-up/400_100#post_24424843

And the video of the mechanism in action:

I don't think I'd be able to use that mechanism as-is, since it opens "in" and I need one that opens "out". Plus, it's intended for hidden doors. And it's $900 for the mechanism alone! HOWEVER, the close-up at 25 seconds gives me the idea that what I need is TWO tracks and I can do roughly the same but in reverse. This would almost surely work if I learn better metal working skills than I currently have.
Yea I think that was it. But you should be able to mount it on either side either pushing out of the theater or pushing into the theater. It just depends where you want the rails. It looks like he hid it behind a reclaimed wood facade and sort of made it into a pocket.
cw5billwade is offline  
post #498 of 794 Old 06-13-2014, 09:54 AM
Senior Member
 
kmhvball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mason, Ohio
Posts: 374
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked: 52
Well, I last night I made my 12 'backer boxes', which maybe I would call more of a 'Backer Sandwich", it took about an hour in total... This relates back to Post 427/29 (&448)

I ended up with this configuration:
3/4" MDF Solid with Green Glue
5/8" Drywall Solid w Green Glue
3/8" Drywall w/ Hole w Green Glue
3/8" Dyrwall w/ Hole

I used this based on the concern expressed about Fire hazard, figuring the fire-rated drywall would be the way to go - and frankly, much easier to 'cut' that as well, so, doing it again - I probably would do two layers of the 5/8" solid Drywall.

Then with the two ceiling layers of 5/8" drywall, the box depth will match my ceiling depth with my 'backer' boxes.

Here are the parts in there individual piece forms...


Here are the parts with Green Glue applied... "Learning", I applied the GG to the 'fronts', defined as the part on the Theater side vs the 'ceiling/subfloor' side of the MDF, 5/8" Drywall, and the 3/8" Drywall... This meant when I did the 5/8" drywall 'all over', the 3/8" light box 'hole' had GG all over. So, to do it again, I would put the GG on the 'theater side' of the two 3/8" drywall layers, and the theater side of the 5/8" drywall layer..



Here is what the 'final' product looks like. These will be installed onto the subfloor side of the drywall in the correct locations before the Drywall is lifted into place. The circle at the top is the Surface Mount LED light.



We'll see how this all works out.
granroth likes this.
kmhvball is offline  
post #499 of 794 Old 07-14-2014, 07:57 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 0
I have a contractor finishing my basement currently. He quoted me to put sound proofing in the ceiling. It was going to be a special sound proofing material that they use in recording studios. They tried installing it but apparently it wasn't staying put in my ceiling, so they decided to go with 10 inches of the standard pink fiber insulation, which he said they also use for sound proofing depending on the circumstance.

My question is, is this a sufficient sound proofing material that will do the same job as the specific sound proofing material? Or is this not good for what I need?
SteveS78 is offline  
post #500 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 06:45 AM
AVS Special Member
 
cw5billwade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: GA
Posts: 1,488
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
Liked: 132
Standard pink fiberglass insulation is sll you need insure the drywall is decoupled wit clips and hat channel and use backer boxes on all light fixtures
cw5billwade is offline  
post #501 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 06:52 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post
Standard pink fiberglass insulation is sll you need insure the drywall is decoupled wit clips and hat channel and use backer boxes on all light fixtures
Dude, I am not the person doing the work. I have a contractor doing it for me. I am at work everyday when they are at my house, doing everything. So I only check out what they have done each day when I get home after 5:30.

Why do these other things you mentioned need to be done? I am just paying for sound proofing material and the labor to put it in. I do not feel comfortable telling these guys how to do their job, especially since I am not even there when they are working on it.

Thanks for the help!
SteveS78 is offline  
post #502 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 07:11 AM
Senior Member
 
ClemsonJeeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Ashburn, VA
Posts: 464
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 119 Post(s)
Liked: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveS78 View Post
Dude, I am not the person doing the work. I have a contractor doing it for me. I am at work everyday when they are at my house, doing everything. So I only check out what they have done each day when I get home after 5:30.

Why do these other things you mentioned need to be done? I am just paying for sound proofing material and the labor to put it in. I do not feel comfortable telling these guys how to do their job, especially since I am not even there when they are working on it.

Thanks for the help!
Because for quality soundproofing you need to attack the problem from multiple angles. One of which is decoupling your drywall from the studs/joists.

I don't think you will be too happy with the results of just stuffing insulation into all the walls and calling it a day. Will it help? Yes, compared to a hollow wall it might absorb a little sound. I guess it depends on your end goal.

If they haven't dry walled yet, then clips + channel is a relatively inexpensive thing to add at this point. Just make sure when they only put screws into the channel and don't hit studs.

My Home Theater Build: The Vortex Theater Build
ClemsonJeeper is offline  
post #503 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 07:38 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Would you need to do the same thing (decoupling) if the special sound proofing material was installed up there as opposed to the stanard pink fiber insulation? You would need to do that either way?

Thanks
SteveS78 is offline  
post #504 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 07:50 AM
Senior Member
 
kmhvball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mason, Ohio
Posts: 374
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Liked: 52
I suggest checking out the soundproofingcompany web-site. They discuss the 4 elements of sound proofing:
1) De-coupling (i.e., the clips & Channel)
2) Mass (i.e., 2 layers of 5/8" Drywall on the ceiling/walls)
3) Dampening (i.e., a material called Green Glue used between Drywall layers)
4) Absorption (i.e., insulation type material)

Absorption is the least impactful. The data suggests no particular forms of insulation, whether pink fluffy insulation, or 'sound studio insulation' is much better than others.

If you truly want good sound reduction, you need to use all 4 parts of the equation. If you want 'better than nothing', then adding insulation is an improvement - but not a whole lot.

Depends what your goals/objectives are of the space.
kmhvball is offline  
post #505 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 07:55 AM
Senior Member
 
ClemsonJeeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Ashburn, VA
Posts: 464
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 119 Post(s)
Liked: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveS78 View Post
Would you need to do the same thing (decoupling) if the special sound proofing material was installed up there as opposed to the stanard pink fiber insulation? You would need to do that either way?

Thanks
It all depends on your soundproofing goals. No amount of "special soundproofing material" in a wall is going to accomplish what taking multiple steps toward soundproofing will do.

Most people on here will do:

1) Decoupling
2) Damping
3) Mass
4) Absorption

Some good reading is at http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...-construction/

If the people building your room are telling you that just putting some "special soundproofing material" or insulation in the walls will get you a totally soundproofed room, then you need to get a second opinion.


Edit: just saw kmhvball's post above mine.. beat me to it. :-)

My Home Theater Build: The Vortex Theater Build

Last edited by ClemsonJeeper; 07-15-2014 at 07:59 AM.
ClemsonJeeper is offline  
post #506 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 04:58 PM
AVS Special Member
 
cw5billwade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: GA
Posts: 1,488
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
Liked: 132
what they said don't let them take your money saying they are soundproofing the ceiling. $400 for insulation and labor to install is all I would pay if that is all they are doing.
cw5billwade is offline  
post #507 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 06:58 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveS78 View Post
I have a contractor finishing my basement currently. He quoted me to put sound proofing in the ceiling. It was going to be a special sound proofing material that they use in recording studios. They tried installing it but apparently it wasn't staying put in my ceiling, so they decided to go with 10 inches of the standard pink fiber insulation, which he said they also use for sound proofing depending on the circumstance.

My question is, is this a sufficient sound proofing material that will do the same job as the specific sound proofing material? Or is this not good for what I need?
It's important to note that there are no realistic magic bullets with soundproofing. Okay, yeah, maybe a 6 foot thick solid concrete wall would be a single soundproofing component that would fit the bill on its own... but short of that, you're going to need to combine several elements to get a worthwhile effect.

Without knowing what the "special sound proofing material" is, it's not possible to say what effect it would have nor what an alternative would be. It could contribute to mass, damping, or absorption (or some combination), all of which could have different alternatives. I can say that that material alone would not have soundproofed your room. At best, it would have reduced the sound level of transferred noise by some number of decibels for certain frequencies -- but not all, and likely not to the level that you'd prefer.

Standard pink fiberglass insulation is, indeed, a common soundproofing component. It works as an absorption agent. Like the aforementioned special soundproofing material, it will reduce the sound level of a range of (mostly higher) frequencies. Depending on how it was installed, it could also contribute towards acoustically controlling sound inside of the room (a separate topic). Really, it's great stuff and it's why it's used so commonly.

BUT, it should only be considered one part of a soundproofing strategy and a relatively minor one at that.
granroth is offline  
post #508 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 08:27 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Thanks for the info guys. I called my contractor today and brought this up to him. He said they had installed the decoupled clips eith metal channels on some homes before with some mixed results. They had some homes where this was done, and there was an annoying squeaking sound to go along with it. He did however get a price for me for adding the decoupled clips and channel. He quoted me $350 for doing that to the TV side of the basement. Which is the portion they insulated for me.

One thing I would like to note. I am not really looking for a professional level recording studio caliber bit of sound proofing where the room being constructed becomes basically a sound vacuum and literally nothing gets out soundwise. All I am really trying to accomplish is not waking up our 1 year old daughter after 8 or 9 pm when she is asleep while we are trying to watch a movie in the basement. Keep in mind, we live in a 2 story home, all bedrooms are on the 2nd floor and the basement is of course below ground meaning there is one floor between the basement and the bedrooms which helps.

Will what I am doing be sufficient for that?
SteveS78 is offline  
post #509 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 10:45 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
granroth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveS78 View Post
Thanks for the info guys. I called my contractor today and brought this up to him. He said they had installed the decoupled clips eith metal channels on some homes before with some mixed results. They had some homes where this was done, and there was an annoying squeaking sound to go along with it. He did however get a price for me for adding the decoupled clips and channel. He quoted me $350 for doing that to the TV side of the basement. Which is the portion they insulated for me.

One thing I would like to note. I am not really looking for a professional level recording studio caliber bit of sound proofing where the room being constructed becomes basically a sound vacuum and literally nothing gets out soundwise. All I am really trying to accomplish is not waking up our 1 year old daughter after 8 or 9 pm when she is asleep while we are trying to watch a movie in the basement. Keep in mind, we live in a 2 story home, all bedrooms are on the 2nd floor and the basement is of course below ground meaning there is one floor between the basement and the bedrooms which helps.

Will what I am doing be sufficient for that?
Clips and channels absolutely go a long way towards reducing sound travel. You do need to be a little careful about what materials are used as well as how it's done. For instance, some contractors like to use resilient channel assuming it's the same thing and it's simply not.

Will that be sufficient for your purposes? I really hate to say it, but we simply can't predict that. Stopping the propagation of sound waves requires an integrated solution since all the parts work together and can, non-ideally, work against each other. For instance, if you concentrate all efforts on one wall, then that will likely ignore the flanking paths that sound can take through the other walls and the ceiling. The sound will absolutely be reduced, but possibly not by as much as you'd want. The amount of sound reduction is specific to your house and the perception of "enough" is highly personal.

I'd strongly recommend reading the first post to this thread: Soundproofing Master Thread - Post 1 since it gives an overview of the elements you'd be looking at. In particular, I STRONGLY recommend reading the linked articles because they are truly excellent and describe things far better than I could. In fact, I'll link to them here, too:

Advice from Anthony Grimani (PMI) - Soundproofing 101: How to Keep Your Home Theater Quiet
Advice from Ted White (Soundproofing Company) - 4 Elements of Soundproofing

They are not at all long and cram tons of essential knowledge in one place. If you have time, then start reading some of the articles here: Soundproofing 101. That'll fill in some gaps.
granroth is offline  
post #510 of 794 Old 07-15-2014, 11:12 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 0
How low would my ceiling be lowered if I choose to decouple it from the joists?
SteveS78 is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off