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post #601 of 613 Old 09-02-2014, 07:12 AM
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a few IB3 clips may work but the base may get the screen wall shaking LOL. Not much surface contact on the minimualist wall to ceiling not sure it will matter much


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post #602 of 613 Old 09-04-2014, 09:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by panino View Post
I've already posted this in my theater thread, but decided to repost the question here so I can get a broader expert opinion on this soundproofing issue.

I'm about to build my screenwall. Since the stage is essentially sitting free from the walls to isolate any sound transmission, should I also decouple it from the ceiling when I build the screen wall? I would think the answer is yes, but I don't think I've seen any build on here that has done that. Everyone seems to just run posts from the stage floor straight up to the ceiling with no decoupling brackets. I would imagine there would be some transmittal of sound, especially low frequencies, into the ceiling this way, but maybe it is negligible?
There is a huge difference between the stage and the screenwall, though, and it has everything to do without how much surface area is in contact with the decoupled shell (walls and ceiling). A stage will have a pretty massive footprint pressed against the walls, if there is no gap, and this will result in a lot of energy being transferred to the walls. A screenwall, on the other hand, has a pretty negligible footprint on the ceiling resulting in pretty big drop in how much energy will be transferred.

I wish I had some numbers, but I can't find any anywhere.

That said, I was asking earlier about "through" door jambs versus disconnected ones especially since in one very specialized case, something as simple as a broom handle bridging outer and inner walls resulted in a staggering drop in soundproofing effectiveness. BasementBob gave a very good answer for that but, never being satisfied leaving well enough alone, I asked Rod Gervais directly. His response is excellent : Rod Gervais Answer

Seriously, I'd recommend that everybody read that, since even his anecdotes are golden.

Anyway, the very very simplified answer (very simplified. very!) is that while the true reason is that the specific details matter a lot, there is a big element related to how much surface contact we are talking about. A through door jamb is touching the two walls in only a small footprint, compared to how much contact a non-decoupled wall would have between the layers of drywall or even the amount of contact that a concrete slab has on both decoupled walls.

That principle applies to the decoupled screenwall question, I think.


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post #603 of 613 Old 09-05-2014, 01:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post
There is a huge difference between the stage and the screenwall, though, and it has everything to do without how much surface area is in contact with the decoupled shell (walls and ceiling). A stage will have a pretty massive footprint pressed against the walls, if there is no gap, and this will result in a lot of energy being transferred to the walls. A screenwall, on the other hand, has a pretty negligible footprint on the ceiling resulting in pretty big drop in how much energy will be transferred.
concrete slab has on both decoupled walls.
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a few IB3 clips may work but the base may get the screen wall shaking LOL. Not much surface contact on the minimualist wall to ceiling not sure it will matter much

Thanks guys for the advice! Even though my screenwall probably won't qualify as "minimalist" when done, I'll try to work towards decreasing the footprint where it touches the ceiling and side walls as much as possible. Hopefully this will be enough that my ceiling won't start shaking when the woofer goes woof.


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post #604 of 613 Old 09-13-2014, 07:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Caulk PLUS tape/mud in corners?

The canonical procedure for sealing a theater includes applying a bead of acoustic (50yr) caulk in all corners. This includes wall to ceiling; wall to wall; and wall to floor.

My understanding based on many photos of other theaters, including those designed by "name" designers, is that even though the corners are caulked, they must also be taped and mudded, like normal.

Can somebody confirm? Or say why not?


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post #605 of 613 Old 09-13-2014, 07:23 PM
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Granroth:

I don't paint caulk (except on windows).

The floor always has floorboards instead.


The ceiling can have trim instead.


For the wall to wall corner, just the traditional:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=cr-vImEx3UM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=4TM8dZ1lJmo
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Last edited by BasementBob; 09-13-2014 at 07:29 PM.
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post #606 of 613 Old 09-14-2014, 05:04 AM
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Drywall guy was not happy where I called a big gap they needed to mud


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post #607 of 613 Old 09-14-2014, 05:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post
Drywall guy was not happy where I called a big gap they needed to mud
I assume you meant "where I CAULKED a big gap they needed to mud". Did they say why he cared at all?


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post #608 of 613 Old 09-14-2014, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post
The canonical procedure for sealing a theater includes applying a bead of acoustic (50yr) caulk in all corners. This includes wall to ceiling; wall to wall; and wall to floor.

My understanding based on many photos of other theaters, including those designed by "name" designers, is that even though the corners are caulked, they must also be taped and mudded, like normal.

Can somebody confirm? Or say why not?
I am also curious on if corners needs to be caulked AND taped/mudded.

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post #609 of 613 Old 09-14-2014, 07:54 PM
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I have a question regarding the wiring. In the pics I have seen of soundproof installs, the insulation is right against the drywall.

I have my inner walls 1" from the existing walls. Can I run my wires in that 1" space, or should I run them through the studs like normal? If I run them through the studs, how should I try to position the wire and the insulation? Should I try to push the wire back so the insulation lays on top so it's flush with the studs as best I can? Or put the insulation behind the wire and use the wire to help hold the insulation in?

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post #610 of 613 Old 09-14-2014, 08:08 PM
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Mud & 'Tape'

If the gap is larger than 1/8" then paper tape might not last. If the gap is 3/8" and something touches the paper, it'll poke right through. If the wall moves, and it will, the rigid paper tape will rip.
The second youtube video in post #605 shows using plastic corner bead instead of paper tape.

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Last edited by BasementBob; 09-14-2014 at 08:20 PM.
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post #611 of 613 Old 09-14-2014, 08:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzy49 View Post
In the pics I have seen of soundproof installs, the insulation is right against the drywall.
Yes, that's normal. You want the transmitted sound to go through the insulation to reduce wall resonance

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzy49 View Post
I have my inner walls 1" from the existing walls. Can I run my wires in that 1" space
Sure. But remember that wall wires have to be fastened (stapled) within 12" of every termination (outlet, switch, etc) and every few feet depending upon local building code (unless going through studs horizontally in which case the cable should be at least 1.25" from the nailing edge which is usually the middle of the stud).
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or should I run them through the studs like normal?
Normal is best -- nice and predictable for future renovators, and tends to last.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzy49 View Post
If I run them through the studs, how should I try to position the wire and the insulation? Should I try to push the wire back so the insulation lays on top so it's flush with the studs as best I can? Or put the insulation behind the wire and use the wire to help hold the insulation in?
That's one way. The way I do it is to take the 4"thick insulation, and cut a horizontal line into the insulation about 2" deep where the horizontal wire goes, and then push the insulation into place. Thus the face of the insulation is not cut, and there's little force on the wire, and the wire holds the insulation in place a bit. Alternatively you can cut insulation to fit above the wire, and then insulation to fit below the wire, and if you've cut it correctly you won't be able to see the wire because the upper and lower insulation touch and cover the wire.

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post #612 of 613 Old 09-16-2014, 11:27 PM
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Soundproofing basement, insulation, beadboard, ventilation issue

I am soundproofing my basement. We installed R 14 insulation,, flush with the bottom of the joists, and have applied the first layer of 5/8" drywall. I plan on using soundproofing caulk between the panels, and then doing greenglue and a second layer of 5/8" drywall. I want to finish with beadboard on the ceiling. I am wondering:

1. If I could just do the beadboard finish rather than doing the second layer of drywall and then the beadboard, going with the greenglue method on the beadboard. I know the idea is to increase mass, but I've no clue how the mass of beadboard compares with drywall.

2. Do I need to be worried about air flow issues with the insulation, drywall, drywall, beadboard layers? The basement does not have moisture issues overall, but I'm not sure how adding all that insulation and drywall and then beadboard will trap heat or breathe. Most of the upstairs is old hardwood, with some rugs and the master is carpeted.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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post #613 of 613 Old 09-17-2014, 07:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marysue007 View Post
I am soundproofing my basement. We installed R 14 insulation,, flush with the bottom of the joists, and have applied the first layer of 5/8" drywall. I plan on using soundproofing caulk between the panels, and then doing greenglue and a second layer of 5/8" drywall. I want to finish with beadboard on the ceiling. I am wondering:

1. If I could just do the beadboard finish rather than doing the second layer of drywall and then the beadboard, going with the greenglue method on the beadboard. I know the idea is to increase mass, but I've no clue how the mass of beadboard compares with drywall.

2. Do I need to be worried about air flow issues with the insulation, drywall, drywall, beadboard layers? The basement does not have moisture issues overall, but I'm not sure how adding all that insulation and drywall and then beadboard will trap heat or breathe. Most of the upstairs is old hardwood, with some rugs and the master is carpeted.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
I assume you are referring to using soundproofing (acoustic) caulk in the corners and not actually between the panels. Caulk would do very little between panels.

How close the beadboard would compare to 5/8" Type X drywall depends entirely on what type of material it is as well as how thick it is. Most beadboard I've seen is 1/8" thick, and so it wouldn't even remotely compare to the drywall. If it was close to 5/8" thick, then it could be okay. The details matter.

You shouldn't have to worry about air flow issues in that sense. Houses aren't designed with air leaks in mind, so blocking them can only help. That said, if you have central heating or cooling that depends on the return air flow going under a door and you seal the door... then you might have issues keeping the room conditioned without an explicit return vent.


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