Soundproofing master thread - Page 31 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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Old 02-17-2015, 05:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Fineberg View Post
Question. How far down do clips and channel come from the floor joists above? I have a few pipes that stick out from flush from the above floor joists. I am wondering if they need to be moved or if the clips/channels will be enough clrarance. Thanks!
Depends on which clips you're using. I believe some are as small as 1 1/8" or as much as 1 5/8". Some clips even have extension clips to drop them about 4 inches. They cost a little more though.
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Old 02-17-2015, 06:03 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by ch1sox View Post
Depends on which clips you're using. I believe some are as small as 1 1/8" or as much as 1 5/8". Some clips even have extension clips to drop them about 4 inches. They cost a little more though.
Ah, missed the original question for this.

Yeah, normally people are asking how to minimize the clearance of the clips and not expand them! The answer is in the 1/8" to 1/4" range, btw.

For maximized clearance, then 1-5/8" is the typical size of Whisper Clips. If more clearance is needed, then I suggest just adding blocking to achieve the correct height -- far cheaper than any extension clip.
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:40 AM
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Sorry. Is there a guide to adding blocking. I'm thinking I MAY need to do this. Unless I can move up the drain pipe in the picture:
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Old 02-18-2015, 10:30 AM
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I'm currently in the design phase of my basement HT and I want to make sure I have some assumptions correct.
My HT room is 11'9" W x 20' 8" L x 9' H

I am slightly concerned about the width of the room.

3 of the walls are foundation/concrete walls. For the concrete walls I was planning on building a metal stud with the following specs:

Air Gap + Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1 + 1.625 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 3.84375
I don't know if 2.5" fiberglass insulation is available or if Rigid foam would help at all for the wall. Anyone have an idea?
connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

My next question involves the 4th wall which 6' 7" of the existing wall is shared by the laundry room.
The other 14' of the wall does not exist yet and would be a new build.

I had two thoughts on this either do the Laundry wall with IB-1 clips

Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1.3125 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 2.53125
Insulate with fiberglass R15 connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

or do the Laundry wall with a Staggered Stud configuration.

Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 2.21875
Insulate with fiberglass R15 connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

The last 14' or so if that wall would need to be built but I guess I could offset the 14' wall slightly so it wouldn't have to match up perfectly with the current laundry room wall. This would help where the room narrows to 10' 4" (if the wall was straight across)

Lastly the ceiling would be decoupled with IB-1 clips or by some form of blocking and IB-1 clips to lower the ceiling slightly to get under some piping.
I've attached a drawing to help illustrate my thoughts.

Thanks for everyone's help and advice!
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:41 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Fineberg View Post
Sorry. Is there a guide to adding blocking. I'm thinking I MAY need to do this. Unless I can move up the drain pipe in the picture:
The best guides will be ones related to applying strapping to a ceiling to level it for drywall. There's a lot of them. The concept is identical. You'd essentially be attaching some kind of 2-by material (depending on how far down you need to go) perpendicularly to your joists and then attaching the clips to those strips.

Another option is a stylistic one -- maybe consider creating a coffered ceiling and just hiding the drain pipe in one of the coffer ridges. You're likely going to be putting a soffit around the ductwork, right? Presumably another one on the other side to balance it out? A coffered ceiling between them would look slick.
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:54 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefelRadar View Post
I'm currently in the design phase of my basement HT and I want to make sure I have some assumptions correct.
My HT room is 11'9" W x 20' 8" L x 9' H

I am slightly concerned about the width of the room.

3 of the walls are foundation/concrete walls. For the concrete walls I was planning on building a metal stud with the following specs:

Air Gap + Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1 + 1.625 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 3.84375
I don't know if 2.5" fiberglass insulation is available or if Rigid foam would help at all for the wall. Anyone have an idea?
If you are suggesting the rigid foam for insulation purposes (it is a foundation wall after all), then yes, that's a great way to get a decent amount of insulation in a small amount of space. It does a terrible job of soundproofing, though, and isn't at all a replacement for fluffy fiberglass or similar from an absorption point of view.

I'm assuming that "skinny" fiberglass is available, since the existing fiberglass insulation in my (block) house is roughly 2" thick. It had to come from somewhere :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by DefelRadar View Post
connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

My next question involves the 4th wall which 6' 7" of the existing wall is shared by the laundry room.
The other 14' of the wall does not exist yet and would be a new build.

I had two thoughts on this either do the Laundry wall with IB-1 clips

Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1.3125 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 2.53125
Insulate with fiberglass R15 connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

or do the Laundry wall with a Staggered Stud configuration.

Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 2.21875
Insulate with fiberglass R15 connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

The last 14' or so if that wall would need to be built but I guess I could offset the 14' wall slightly so it wouldn't have to match up perfectly with the current laundry room wall. This would help where the room narrows to 10' 4" (if the wall was straight across)

Lastly the ceiling would be decoupled with IB-1 clips or by some form of blocking and IB-1 clips to lower the ceiling slightly to get under some piping.
I've attached a drawing to help illustrate my thoughts.

Thanks for everyone's help and advice!
As far as staggered studs vs clips go -- the clips may give a slightly better result than staggered studs, but if space is that much of an issue and you think you can gain some space that way, then it likely won't be enough to be worth it.
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Old 02-19-2015, 04:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by granroth View Post
The best guides will be ones related to applying strapping to a ceiling to level it for drywall. There's a lot of them. The concept is identical. You'd essentially be attaching some kind of 2-by material (depending on how far down you need to go) perpendicularly to your joists and then attaching the clips to those strips.

Another option is a stylistic one -- maybe consider creating a coffered ceiling and just hiding the drain pipe in one of the coffer ridges. You're likely going to be putting a soffit around the ductwork, right? Presumably another one on the other side to balance it out? A coffered ceiling between them would look slick.
Awesome. Thanks for the suggestion. To answer your question. Yep. I'll be putting a soffit around that duct work (don't need to replace it with flexi duct?) and a maching one in the opposite side and the front and back

Coffered isn't a bad ide. We shall see

He blocking method sounds like a simpler (and cheaper) plan though
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:42 AM
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Brian I would do a double wall back at the laundry room. I know it takes more space but do you really want to hear the washer spining in the middle of a movie? DW/GG/OSB/2x4/1"air gap/2x4/DW/DW both areas of 2x4 wall has R15 in them. That is what I did on my rear wall.
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by granroth View Post
The best guides will be ones related to applying strapping to a ceiling to level it for drywall. There's a lot of them. The concept is identical. You'd essentially be attaching some kind of 2-by material (depending on how far down you need to go) perpendicularly to your joists and then attaching the clips to those strips.

Another option is a stylistic one -- maybe consider creating a coffered ceiling and just hiding the drain pipe in one of the coffer ridges. You're likely going to be putting a soffit around the ductwork, right? Presumably another one on the other side to balance it out? A coffered ceiling between them would look slick.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post
Brian I would do a double wall back at the laundry room. I know it takes more space but do you really want to hear the washer spining in the middle of a movie? DW/GG/OSB/2x4/1"air gap/2x4/DW/DW both areas of 2x4 wall has R15 in them. That is what I did on my rear wall.
Are you talking to me? My laundry room is on the floor above
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Old 02-19-2015, 12:37 PM
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Old 02-19-2015, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefelRadar View Post
I'm currently in the design phase of my basement HT and I want to make sure I have some assumptions correct.
My HT room is 11'9" W x 20' 8" L x 9' H

I am slightly concerned about the width of the room.

3 of the walls are foundation/concrete walls. For the concrete walls I was planning on building a metal stud with the following specs:

Air Gap + Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1 + 1.625 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 3.84375
I don't know if 2.5" fiberglass insulation is available or if Rigid foam would help at all for the wall. Anyone have an idea?
connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

My next question involves the 4th wall which 6' 7" of the existing wall is shared by the laundry room.
The other 14' of the wall does not exist yet and would be a new build.

I had two thoughts on this either do the Laundry wall with IB-1 clips

Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1.3125 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 2.53125
Insulate with fiberglass R15 connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

or do the Laundry wall with a Staggered Stud configuration.

Stud + 1st layer OSB + 2nd layer Drywall = Total Thickness
1 + 0.59375 + 0.625 = 2.21875
Insulate with fiberglass R15 connect to ceiling joists with IB-3 brackets

The last 14' or so if that wall would need to be built but I guess I could offset the 14' wall slightly so it wouldn't have to match up perfectly with the current laundry room wall. This would help where the room narrows to 10' 4" (if the wall was straight across)

Lastly the ceiling would be decoupled with IB-1 clips or by some form of blocking and IB-1 clips to lower the ceiling slightly to get under some piping.
I've attached a drawing to help illustrate my thoughts.

Thanks for everyone's help and advice!
I would do a double wall back at the laundry room. I know it takes more space but do you really want to hear the washer spining in the middle of a movie? DW/GG/OSB/2x4/1"air gap/2x4/DW/DW both areas of 2x4 wall has R15 in them. That is what I did on my rear wall.
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Old 02-21-2015, 03:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Brian Fineberg View Post
Sorry. Is there a guide to adding blocking. I'm thinking I MAY need to do this. Unless I can move up the drain pipe in the picture:
How do I go about that hvac duct?

For the screen wall which goes perpendicuL to what you see and in front of the hvac and water heater do I just frame around the ductwork. And dd/gg the ceiling and walls but not the ductworks? Then build a dd/gg soffit around the ductwork sales with caulking?

Trying to wrap my head around this.

Thanks
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Old 02-21-2015, 04:31 AM
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Hey guys, I don't want to be a nerd or a killjoy but regarding insulation on the basement concrete walls keep in mind that 9.36. (energy efficiency) of the building code of Canada requires a minimum R-value, off the top of my head R-22 depending on the climate zone you're in, which translates to a slightly thicker 2x6 batt or rigid insulation of varied thickness depending on type (extruded is better, the fibrey one not the bead board).

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Last edited by mikepos; 02-21-2015 at 04:54 AM.
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Old 02-21-2015, 03:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Brian Fineberg View Post
How do I go about that hvac duct?

For the screen wall which goes perpendicuL to what you see and in front of the hvac and water heater do I just frame around the ductwork. And dd/gg the ceiling and walls but not the ductworks? Then build a dd/gg soffit around the ductwork sales with caulking?
There is an area where there's more than one "right" answer, so it's hard to give a specific recommendation. In general, you'll want to seal off the ductwork due to the amount of noise that'll bring the theater. That implies that there'll be a sealed dd/gg soffit around it.

Now, one way to do that is to fully seal off the room, including the ceiling above the ducts and the wall behind it and then build the soffit inside of the soundproofed shell. That would, indeed, do a better job of overall soundproofing, from the perspective of sound coming in and out of the room. It's notably tricker to do when you have tight clearances, though.

Another option is to frame out the soffit around the ducts to be part of the room framing itself. You then wrap the dd/gg with clips around the entire thing and the soffit becomes an integral part of your wall and ceiling. You essentially will no longer have a rectangular room. That will give you the same sound attenuation from the ducts, but will be mildly less effective for inside/outside sound movement.

On a related note, most screen walls assume an acoustically transparent screen with speakers behind them. Is that what you were thinking? If so, I wonder if that furnace and water heater might be overly intrusive while watching a movie...
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Old 02-21-2015, 03:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mikepos View Post
Hey guys, I don't want to be a nerd or a killjoy but regarding insulation on the basement concrete walls keep in mind that 9.36. (energy efficiency) of the building code of Canada requires a minimum R-value, off the top of my head R-22 depending on the climate zone you're in, which translates to a slightly thicker 2x6 batt or rigid insulation of varied thickness depending on type (extruded is better, the fibrey one not the bead board).
Not a killjoy at all! The standard recommendation for building a theater is to get the proper permits for it and get it inspected, from a safety, resale, and insurability point of view. In the U.S., insulation requirements are done at the local code enforcement level, which may be as local as a city or may be a county. Sometimes states have codes.

For example, AZ (my state) does not follow any energy codes and leaves it to the LCE. In my case, that's the city, which does require minimum insulation for all new construction (R-13 for walls, nothing for basements if you have one). In MA, by way of contrast, the code requirements come at the state level and you need to follow the 2012 variant. That means R-20 for walls and R-15 to R-19 for basements (depending on factors).

There's also possible requirements for slab insulation and then there's always the omnipresent vapor barrier requirements... and it goes on and on.

We tend to gloss over code requirements in this thread if only because they do vary so much and the assumption is that you'll cover that with your building inspector.
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Old 02-21-2015, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by granroth View Post
There is an area where there's more than one "right" answer, so it's hard to give a specific recommendation. In general, you'll want to seal off the ductwork due to the amount of noise that'll bring the theater. That implies that there'll be a sealed dd/gg soffit around it.

Now, one way to do that is to fully seal off the room, including the ceiling above the ducts and the wall behind it and then build the soffit inside of the soundproofed shell. That would, indeed, do a better job of overall soundproofing, from the perspective of sound coming in and out of the room. It's notably tricker to do when you have tight clearances, though.

Another option is to frame out the soffit around the ducts to be part of the room framing itself. You then wrap the dd/gg with clips around the entire thing and the soffit becomes an integral part of your wall and ceiling. You essentially will no longer have a rectangular room. That will give you the same sound attenuation from the ducts, but will be mildly less effective for inside/outside sound movement.

On a related note, most screen walls assume an acoustically transparent screen with speakers behind them. Is that what you were thinking? If so, I wonder if that furnace and water heater might be overly intrusive while watching a movie...
Thanks for the reply. To answer your question the "end" of te room will not have the water heater etc in it. Thy will be behind the shell. The actual screen wall (false at wall) will be 2' in front of the shell wal. Sorry for the confusion on that.

I don't inderstand what you mean about the room not being rectangular. Won't that be the same no matter how I frame or drywall the soffit?

I guess I will do like you said and frame the soffit as part of the walls (dd/gg)

Thank you!


Edit: where are you located?
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Old 02-21-2015, 06:17 PM - Thread Starter
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I don't inderstand what you mean about the room not being rectangular. Won't that be the same no matter how I frame or drywall the soffit?
Er.. yeah, I wasn't making sense at all there. I meant that if you soundproofed the walls, then your soundproof shell would have three sides (not counting the floor) but if you wrapped the duct, then it would have five sides (still not counting the floor). Here's two quick mockups -- the red part is the dd/gg "shell" in each:





Visually the two rooms would look identical. You'd still put dd/gg on the upper mockeup (the green part), but the soffit is technically in the room's shell already so what that's doing is just blocking the HVAC duct noise and not the whole of the exterior noise.

Quote:
Edit: where are you located?
Gilbert AZ, close to downtown. Are you in AZ?
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Old 02-22-2015, 04:25 AM
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Ahh that's what I thought. Really no difference between the two. Just logistics. Thanks for pics!

No im in RI. I saw you posted code for MA so I thought maybe you were local to me
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Old 02-22-2015, 06:08 AM
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Sorry. Is there a guide to adding blocking. I'm thinking I MAY need to do this. Unless I can move up the drain pipe in the picture:
Ok another question. Currently the "supply" to the area I will be building is simply a vent cut into the hvac line if you look closely it's the white vent on the top left. How do I go about sound proofing that? Do I cover it up then build another soundproofed supply by cutting into the hvac

I have no clue about hvac stuff so all the help I can get is appreciated
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Old 02-22-2015, 09:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Ok another question. Currently the "supply" to the area I will be building is simply a vent cut into the hvac line if you look closely it's the white vent on the top left. How do I go about sound proofing that? Do I cover it up then build another soundproofed supply by cutting into the hvac

I have no clue about hvac stuff so all the help I can get is appreciated
Oof.. that can get complicated. One option is to determine how satisfied you are with the current setup from a comfort point of view as well as a noise point of view. If both are fine, you might consider just leaving it mostly as-is. I would only do that if you are putting the shell behind the ductwork, though, as this would be punching a hole through it.

If it's not cutting it from either a comfort or noise perspective, then you will want to branch off from the main duct and develop a custom solution. By coincidence, I actually started a thread some months ago talking about various HVAC aspects that are relevant to this discussion: Theater HVAC - Dead Vents vs Zones vs Mini Splits

If there's one takeaway from that, it's that you should separate the "comfort" part of HVAC with the "noise" part. Almost nothing is out of bounds for a dedicated DIYer, but HVAC has so many variables that it can come close. Your best bet is to dictate your comfort requirements to an HVAC contractor and have them do all that work and then handle the noise element yourself.

TL;DR - you'll want to get the air speed below 300 linear feet per minute at every grille, by increasing the cross-section surface area of the duct work.
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:01 AM
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So I could essentially use that supply vent (to regulate temp) Then build a dead vent return to an adjacent room? I could always extend that vent into the adjacent floor joist cavity and sound proof it along the way and have it exhaust on the ceiling of the Ht

Does that sound like it could work?
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Old 02-22-2015, 10:25 AM
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My major issue is currently he basment is freezing in be winter. (In not too worried about heat in the summer the basement stays cool)

So a dead vent doesn't help with the warming issues

How about a muffler for inside a joist? For the supply?

Somthing like this
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-dedicated-theater-design-construction/1533361-hidden-bethesda-family-theater-2.html

My question. Is how do I cover the current hole for the vent there now and create a new hole for the flex duct to go into the joist cavity?

Last edited by Brian Fineberg; 02-22-2015 at 12:33 PM.
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Old 02-22-2015, 07:57 PM
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The entrance to my theater will be french doors. I know what you are all going to say.. "get rid of the french doors and go with a single door". Already thought about it and I'm intent on making the french doors work. The question I have is, does anyone have a recommendation on a set of door seals and automatic door bottoms that I should go with? I've looked through Zero International's site and there are so many to choose from.

I'm planning on sealing the point where both doors meet with an astragal and seal, adhesive seal around the frames, and automatic door bottoms on both doors. The doors are only 1 3/8" thick, but are solid core. I'll probably completely mortise the door bottoms into the doors, so I'll need a set that is rather thin. I need recommendations on which seals and door bottoms to use for this.
panino - how did you tackle your french doors?
My brother inlaw has them, just your basic interior french doors not solid core, and was thinking to upgrade his for more effective soundproofing.
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Old 02-22-2015, 08:09 PM
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How did this turn out for you?

Seems like instead of can lights for middle ceiling lighting this should be the direction, for those that want easier soundproofing than backer boxes.

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Originally Posted by kmhvball View Post
Well, I last night I made my 12 'backer boxes', which maybe I would call more of a 'Backer Sandwich", it took about an hour in total... This relates back to Post 427/29 (&448)

I ended up with this configuration:
3/4" MDF Solid with Green Glue
5/8" Drywall Solid w Green Glue
3/8" Drywall w/ Hole w Green Glue
3/8" Dyrwall w/ Hole

I used this based on the concern expressed about Fire hazard, figuring the fire-rated drywall would be the way to go - and frankly, much easier to 'cut' that as well, so, doing it again - I probably would do two layers of the 5/8" solid Drywall.

Then with the two ceiling layers of 5/8" drywall, the box depth will match my ceiling depth with my 'backer' boxes.

Here are the parts in there individual piece forms...


Here are the parts with Green Glue applied... "Learning", I applied the GG to the 'fronts', defined as the part on the Theater side vs the 'ceiling/subfloor' side of the MDF, 5/8" Drywall, and the 3/8" Drywall... This meant when I did the 5/8" drywall 'all over', the 3/8" light box 'hole' had GG all over. So, to do it again, I would put the GG on the 'theater side' of the two 3/8" drywall layers, and the theater side of the 5/8" drywall layer..



Here is what the 'final' product looks like. These will be installed onto the subfloor side of the drywall in the correct locations before the Drywall is lifted into place. The circle at the top is the Surface Mount LED light.



We'll see how this all works out.
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Old 02-23-2015, 05:04 AM
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My theater room is still Work in Progress... so, don't know for sure how they'll work out yet.

My original plan, i.e., the comment above the last photo was:
"These will be installed onto the subfloor side of the drywall in the correct locations before the Drywall is lifted into place. "

Instead, I mounted them to joists with IB-3 clips, and then drywallwers cut them out like a normal light. They didn't do this particularly well, so, I am a bit concerned the flat part of the backer box won't be lying flat against the drywall. Net, if I were to do it again, I would definitely mount them before lifting the drywall up, which would ensure they are flush. I would probably even put green glue on the front face of the backer sandwich.

If I ever do another theater and can't put these types of lights in soffits 'inside the shell', I would do this again vs building full backer boxes. Building these with each layer being drywall (vs any MDF), is a very fast to make and doesn't require much precision.

I still have to put acoustic caulk around the boxes themselves and in the electric wire hole penetration.

Another thought...
There are several versions of these "Surface Mount" LED lights, and I would look at what kind of dimmers they are compatible with before choosing the light itself. I used these same lights through-out my basement, and also bought those "Adorne" light switches/ dimmers (the version advertised as CFL/LED compatible). It so happens those dimmers aren't compatible with these particular LED lights I chose, so, I might only be dimming down to 60-70% of light output vs the advertised light floor of something like 10%. This now has me concerned about my theater lighting plan - I thought of using Grafik Eye, and now not sure that is compatible with these lights. Also, other popular options - Vizia RF+, Maestro, etc., don't seem to be compatible either. So, my 'mistake' in my opinion - was buying a light with limited compatibility with dimmers. I THINK (although haven't looked much at them) the Cree version of these are compatible with a much broader range of dimmers.

I'll take a picture of how they look in the ceiling as of now (light not installed) and a picture of my basement/installed one's and post, hopefully tomorrow.
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Old 02-23-2015, 05:22 AM
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^^ Thx for feedback Kevin. I did my HT in 2007 before I learned about the fine details of soundproofing, my cans overhead do leak spl's ....

I'm thinking in late 2016 how to re-do the overhead lighting to improve soundproofing in the center ceiling area w/o a total teardown, what you did I might be able to use as a retrofit...

Last edited by mtbdudex; 02-23-2015 at 05:28 AM.
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Old 02-23-2015, 05:55 AM
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This thread Recessed lighting was started by Ted White, and he was thinking that using this type of light, with as little as Putty Pads might be effective. I don't know if anyone has executed it that way or not, but using those would be even less invasive than what I did to an existing ceiling structure.

If you are tearing out existing cans, then 'less invasive' probably doesn't matter much. Cutting drywall is quite simple, so, making these backer sandwiches is quite easy, so, I would probably go that route if I were doing it, but thought I would share this thread in case it interests you.
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Old 02-23-2015, 09:58 AM
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DIY double door seals, has it been done in this thread?
Documented with data?

I was adding my bought alum track door seals and decided to re-do the door stop from 7/16" to 3/4" and add a EPDM tape attach bulb seal along 3 sides as shown below.

I simply ripped existing 1" x 4" stock, took both good edges, ripped those to 1 5/8" initially, then to 1 3/8" for final cut.
I stained them last night to match, tonight I will install and hopefully take some REW readings with just door stop, then add the alum track door seals and take readings, then remove that and add the EPDM tape attach bulb seal and take readings, then add the alum track door seals for final double seal readings.
This will show pure DIY and pure store bought, then double seal.

Auto door bottom also will be added along the way, I have it also.

Mark-up shows what I'm doing:
I'm setting the new 3/4" depth door stops 1/8" gap from the door per spec sheet, as door is pressed against the shut plate.
EPDM seal bought for that range of gap along handle/top side, the hinge side it's a really small gap so I got the thinnest for that.


These are for 1/8 - 5/16 gap, I'm setting a 1/8 gap, as long as the total reaction force does not make closing efforts too much I should be ok. If so, then I can downsize to the skinniest one.





Here's the before pictures:


.

Last edited by mtbdudex; 02-23-2015 at 02:22 PM.
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Old 02-23-2015, 03:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post
panino - how did you tackle your french doors?
My brother inlaw has them, just your basic interior french doors not solid core, and was thinking to upgrade his for more effective soundproofing.
First off... I wasn't as particular about getting my doors 100% soundproofed (if there is such a thing). I just wanted "good". Your situation may be different. My doors are solid core, so that helps quite a bit. I originally planned on door sweeps, gaskets, and an astragal where the doors meet to seal up the small air gap between both doors. I ended up most of the way there. I installed a carpet divider to provide a nice smooth surface for a door sweep to contact and then installed a door sweep, rather than automatic door bottoms. I lined all edges of the door frame with 1/2" self-adhesive gasket. Since I custom made my frames, I made the stops a bit wider to accommodate the larger 1/2" gasket.

I did not put an astragal on the doors yet. I figured I'd give it awhile and see if I thought I'd need it. There is a noticeable air gap (~1/16") between both doors, so some sound obviously leaks through. However, being that my theater is in the basement and there is no one in sight to disturb this hasn't posed a problem and the leakage seems pretty minimal. In fact, I can have a movie playing fairly loud and it can barely be heard at the top of the basement steps. I can't hear it at all on the level above. Given this, I'm fairly happy with the way my soundproofing turned out and I'll probably forgo an astragal or any further soundproofing of the doors.

Although you could definitely go with more insulating (albeit more expensive) hardware and seals, this is what I used:
Carpet divider: http://www.tmhardware.com/Carpet-Div...ubber-2.5.html
Pemko door sweeps: http://www.tmhardware.com/Door-Sweep...Vinyl-Fin.html
Zero Intl door gasket: http://www.tmhardware.com/Adhesive-W...-Teardrop.html
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Old 03-01-2015, 07:01 AM
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I realize this may have been discussed here before. I just finished building a wall and installing a exterior metal door at the bottom of my basement stairs going into my theater. Before this the whole area was open . This certainly has made a significant difference in reducing much of the sound from traveling up the stairs. I have never been too concerned with soundproofing my basement theater up until now. I used roxul safe and sound in the wall and added another layer to my existing insulated drop ceiling . Except for the very low base i am satisfied with the results except for the door. I feel it is the weak point and am considering adding some mass to it. From my research here i was thinking about 2 sheets of 1/2 " mdf with green glue between them screwed to the inside of the metal door and possible another gasket around the door jam to better seal the mdf. I would appreciate any other thoughts or feedback.

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