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post #61 of 65 Old 05-28-2017, 08:03 AM
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Revitalizing this thread because I'm adding details on where to buy the parts (USA).

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
STRAIGHT STAGE AND SCREEN WALL 101


You build a screen support structure and add the z clips for the screen frame.

I had seen this and several other similar threads when contemplating how to build my front false wall, but when visiting Home Depot, Lowe's, etc., I couldn't tell which of the many choices of lumber Big was talking about. So, a few weeks ago I set out on a mission to sort this out. Now I'm sharing the intel so others don't have to go through the same process! It sounds simple enough, but these stores stock massive amounts of product that look similar (at least to my non-construction-worker eyes).

First up, Home Depot. Walk over to the lumber section and look for this:




Here are some of the corresponding product SKUs you want to focus on:




You will see a label on the wood products that looks like this one. Choose your width, and that's how you know you've found the correct item.




Over at Lowe's, the stack looked like this:




And their SKU's/prices:




Note Lowe's calls the same product "Primed Pine," while Home Depot refers to it as, "Primed FJ Board." I found HD to be slightly more expensive for some lengths, and on par with Lowe's for others. I ultimately purchased from HD out of convenience.
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post #62 of 65 Old 07-12-2017, 07:04 PM
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Can you put this heavy sand on the second floor or do you people generally build in a basement. My media room is in the second floor in Florida.


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post #63 of 65 Old 07-13-2017, 10:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bommai View Post
Can you put this heavy sand on the second floor or do you people generally build in a basement. My media room is in the second floor in Florida.
Most builds on AVS are basement. Some are ground level. Few are 2nd floor or higher.

Sand is very heavy. Play sand is ~120 lbs./cubic ft. Depending on your stage height, one could imagine you'd be at around 60 psf + other construction materials. That MIGHT be OK if you have very beefy floor joists. I would strongly discourage anyone from doing that though unless they've first verified their home's floor joist weight load recommendations in the given area.

If your home was built in the last 10 years or so, there's a very good chance it uses manufactured floor trusses. It's impossible to know their capability without research, as floor trusses are custom made for every home (even spec built homes). The research process requires tracking down the truss manufacturer, job reference number, etc., and convincing the truss manufacturer to provide you with the info you need. That is the ideal method. An alternative is to look the few truss manufacturers that publish span load tables for their trusses. I figure if they are publishing those tables, their trusses support the advertised loads at a minimum. But as I said, it's not an ideal method. What it will do is give you a ballpark idea. Even that approach still requires you to gather some basic info on your floor trusses in the given room, such as their height, O.C. spacing, lumber type, and lumber width.

Bottom line is there's no simple answer (other than don't do it).

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post #64 of 65 Old 07-13-2017, 12:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HT Geek View Post
Most builds on AVS are basement. Some are ground level. Few are 2nd floor or higher.



Sand is very heavy. Play sand is ~120 lbs./cubic ft. Depending on your stage height, one could imagine you'd be at around 60 psf + other construction materials. That MIGHT be OK if you have very beefy floor joists. I would strongly discourage anyone from doing that though unless they've first verified their home's floor joist weight load recommendations in the given area.



If your home was built in the last 10 years or so, there's a very good chance it uses manufactured floor trusses. It's impossible to know their capability without research, as floor trusses are custom made for every home (even spec built homes). The research process requires tracking down the truss manufacturer, job reference number, etc., and convincing the truss manufacturer to provide you with the info you need. That is the ideal method. An alternative is to look the few truss manufacturers that publish span load tables for their trusses. I figure if they are publishing those tables, their trusses support the advertised loads at a minimum. But as I said, it's not an ideal method. What it will do is give you a ballpark idea. Even that approach still requires you to gather some basic info on your floor trusses in the given room, such as their height, O.C. spacing, lumber type, and lumber width.



Bottom line is there's no simple answer (other than don't do it).


Got it. I don't really want to build a stage. I guess I am too lazy for that. But I am contemplating building a simple false wall for an AT screen. Should I just leave my towers and subs on the floor or should I raise them with small isolated structures. Meaning, should I build some little mini stages to place these speakers on?


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post #65 of 65 Old 07-13-2017, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bommai View Post
Got it. I don't really want to build a stage. I guess I am too lazy for that. But I am contemplating building a simple false wall for an AT screen. Should I just leave my towers and subs on the floor or should I raise them with small isolated structures. Meaning, should I build some little mini stages to place these speakers on?
Personal preference, but I would so you can make some effort to isolate vibrations from your speakers/sub into the floor. Something heavy like sand is of course ideal. It is possible to use sand on a 2nd floor if you don't use a lot of it and you're mindful of how much weight you are spreading around and where. Don't forget the weight of your speakers/sub on top of it.

I normally recommend against it because I don't want to see anyone accidentally create a problem in their home, and because figuring out your floor's limitations is a complicated process. Something you may want to do is determine which way your floor joists run and if they are joists or trusses. If you can spread the weight across multiple joists/trusses, you'll have more options. The worst-case scenario is a heavy point load dead center on top of a single truss/joist.

You might consider building a nominal stage and false wall to get them off the floor and using some combination of rubber floor mats and/or a product such as Sorbothane. There is a vendor on Amazon that sells it in various sizes and thicknesses.

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