Sound Isolation with Sloped Ceiling - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 64 Old 07-30-2014, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by SierraMikeBravo View Post
Not unless the steps are quite large. If you keep them a foot or less in height, it offers a small area for reflective surfaces. Far better than leaving the ceiling as is. Treating the angled ceiling, or rather over treating it, will have the effect of over dampening a room, and make it sound dead. Stepping the ceiling will keep things a bit more lively. The steps also don't HAVE to be square. They can be curved. Square is just easier to build. The stepping acts like a first order diffusor. Further, if you use speakers with waveguides as THX specifies, it will limit the dispersion of the sound field in the vertical. But, the only way to truly know for sure is to perform an energy time analysis once the room is done.
Hi Shawn,

Thanks for the great reply!

When you say keep them a foot or less in height you mean a foot before the next step or the height of the step is 1 foot ?

Might need a drawing:




Excuse my terrible MS paint work

If the dude is looking at that screen and the ceiling steps higher away from the screen you mean the red or the black ?
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"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
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post #32 of 64 Old 07-30-2014, 03:09 PM
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Height, but it is something that needs to be played around with to get it to look right.

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post #33 of 64 Old 07-30-2014, 03:15 PM
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Height, but it is something that needs to be played around with to get it to look right.
What ? You don't think my design above was aesthetically pleasing ?

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post #34 of 64 Old 07-30-2014, 04:26 PM
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Very presentable

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post #35 of 64 Old 07-30-2014, 04:55 PM
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lol.

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post #36 of 64 Old 07-30-2014, 06:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Very presentable
It's settled then. Shawn's design services are out. Mfusick's are in. CAD drawings... pff.
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post #37 of 64 Old 07-30-2014, 07:03 PM
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It's settled then. Shawn's design services are out. Mfusick's are in. CAD drawings... pff.
Darn .

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post #38 of 64 Old 08-01-2014, 03:23 AM
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I believe the knee walls in my case are purely decorative, so moving them out may not be a structural issue.

I would like to try to isolate the room as much as possible from the rest of the house. If I were to go the room-within-a-room route then I would lose up to a foot in width (1" air gap plus 3-1/2" stud plus (2) 3/4" sheets of drywall = 6" on either side). So that's 167" (13' 11") - 12" = 155" remaining. Put four seats at around 126" [ (5) 6" armrests + (4) 24" seats ] and I am left with 29". If I centered the chairs in the room that would leave me 14.5" inches of isle space on either side of the chairs - obviously not an option. So, in addition to any acoustical advantages that might have been gained per Dennis Foley's video response, I was also considering expanding the width for layout reasons. I do not think it would make sense to go the full width of the available attic space for fear of banging my head on the new ceiling height, but maybe an extra 6-12" on either side would be nice - at the very least to compensate for the new false walls.

Shawn: is it your opinion that by extending the room width I might create more acoustical issues than I would solve?
Hi Robert,

Dry wall is not going to do it isolation wise. Again, in respect of another question I answered this week, I would advise you watch this video.

Acoustics are a specialized field and I have to respectfully disagree with some of the advice you've just been given. There are many excellent doctors but I only want a heart surgeon working on my heart when I need heart surgery. But I bow out of offering further input at this time except to say that if I were you I would go and find a local acoustic engineer you can trust to look at this for you. Don't make the mistake a new client made and blow a tonne of money, in his case $65K, only to find out his prized home theater had a terrible acoustical stink... and this a guy who works in the industry. So now we have major repair work to do to correct someone else's mistakes.

Good luck and I hope you get it right
Dennis

Chief Acoustic Engineer at Acousticfields.com. Listen to your music...without hearing your room!
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post #39 of 64 Old 08-01-2014, 04:59 AM
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Damped Drywall (two layers of 5/8 with Green Glue) on isolation mounting is one key to containing the sound and subwoofer rumble. I've Built them that way many times and it works. Just another guy working in the industry with hands on theater experience.
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post #40 of 64 Old 08-01-2014, 08:49 AM - Thread Starter
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Dennis, in your video you use the analogy of the train that is on the wrong tracks, etc. Well in my case the train is still in the station. I am still trying to figure out how all of these pieces fit together. My priority right now is sound isolation. You seem to take issue with many of the techniques that are frequently discussed on these forums. A forum, by definition, is a place where ideas are exchanged. That being said, what practical advice can you offer to deal with isolation issues, especially at lower frequencies? Your suggestion to find a local acoustical engineer is probably sound advice, but it has no real practical value in the context of these forums and furthering the discussion.

You have mentioned on several occasions that small rooms can have big issues (reminder, mine is 13' 11"). I don't take you comments on this subject to be offensive or harsh by any means. It is just reality and commonly recognized in these forums. Your advice on many occasions (including in mine) has been to widen the room to help deal with those issues. But when I suggested that I might actually be able to widen my room, you came back and said no, you can't do that because then you'll deal with ceiling height issues. Okay, great, another road block. I get that this may be the nature of acoustics, small rooms, and rooms with ceilings that slope. Now, if you are saying that you think my situation is hopeless, then I would rather hear you say that. Otherwise, what types of solutions can you recommend? I don't think you have to give away the secret sauce to provide valuable feedback.

Most people on these forums inherently understand that the best thing one could do is hire an acoustical engineer to map out a solution for their space. Most people probably don't. And maybe some percentage of those regret it later. If your only advice is to hire an engineer then these forums may not be a good fit for you. I mean that in the most friendly way possible. But hiring an acoustical engineer has its own challenges. [In a Carrie Bradshaw kind of way: ] How can a person avoid being bamboozled by a self-proclaimed expert? What separates the quacks from the craftsman that really understands their craft and how to properly model a space?
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post #41 of 64 Old 08-01-2014, 09:13 AM - Thread Starter
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Damped Drywall (two layers of 5/8 with Green Glue) on isolation mounting is one key to containing the sound and subwoofer rumble. I've Built them that way many times and it works. Just another guy working in the industry with hands on theater experience.
It does seem like the DIY people, especially those under BIG's supervision, have had nothing but good things to say about these types of isolation techniques. Could it be a placebo affect in some of those cases? Maybe. Could it be that these people are justifying the added expense in their minds? I guess.

I have read several cases where people have measured before and after and seen significant results. I suppose that could be due to the fact that most SPL meters do not accurately measure into the lower frequencies. But surely they would feel the rumble in the surrounding rooms.

Perhaps there are people that have had poor isolation experiences, after having based their build practices on the recommendations in these forums. I really do not know, but I would love to read about them if there are (feel free to post any links). I can tell you that if I went through the effort of implementing these strategies and felt like they didn't work, I would be back on these forums to ward people off, and I just don't feel like I have seen a lot of that in the past several months that I have been on the boards.
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post #42 of 64 Old 08-02-2014, 05:59 AM
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Seeing and hearing is believing, get yourself to a properly built theater.


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post #43 of 64 Old 08-04-2014, 08:41 AM
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Dennis, in your video you use the analogy of the train that is on the wrong tracks, etc. Well in my case the train is still in the station. I am still trying to figure out how all of these pieces fit together. My priority right now is sound isolation. You seem to take issue with many of the techniques that are frequently discussed on these forums. A forum, by definition, is a place where ideas are exchanged. That being said, what practical advice can you offer to deal with isolation issues, especially at lower frequencies? Your suggestion to find a local acoustical engineer is probably sound advice, but it has no real practical value in the context of these forums and furthering the discussion.

You have mentioned on several occasions that small rooms can have big issues (reminder, mine is 13' 11"). I don't take you comments on this subject to be offensive or harsh by any means. It is just reality and commonly recognized in these forums. Your advice on many occasions (including in mine) has been to widen the room to help deal with those issues. But when I suggested that I might actually be able to widen my room, you came back and said no, you can't do that because then you'll deal with ceiling height issues. Okay, great, another road block. I get that this may be the nature of acoustics, small rooms, and rooms with ceilings that slope. Now, if you are saying that you think my situation is hopeless, then I would rather hear you say that. Otherwise, what types of solutions can you recommend? I don't think you have to give away the secret sauce to provide valuable feedback.

Most people on these forums inherently understand that the best thing one could do is hire an acoustical engineer to map out a solution for their space. Most people probably don't. And maybe some percentage of those regret it later. If your only advice is to hire an engineer then these forums may not be a good fit for you. I mean that in the most friendly way possible. But hiring an acoustical engineer has its own challenges. [In a Carrie Bradshaw kind of way: ] How can a person avoid being bamboozled by a self-proclaimed expert? What separates the quacks from the craftsman that really understands their craft and how to properly model a space?
I take your point Robert and I appreciate your candor as being involved in this forum is a new experience for me also. We came here to help and intend to do that for the very reason that you state above as we do see a great deal of acoustical advice that will hurt and hinder.

I've asked my colleague to put it on the to do list for tomorrows hangout so I can answer. Tuesday mornings tend to be the only time I have available in my schedule to record these answers.

As to the question you pose here "What separates the quacks from the craftsman that really understands their craft and how to properly model a space?" I would simply advise you to watch this video that multi-platinum, Emmy and Grammy nominated sound engineer Danny Wyatt recorded with me about my technology and my advice:


In the above video Danny charts his experience with our technology and the incredible response it has received from A list engineers and producers including Luca Pretolesi (credits Tiesto, Skrillex, Bruno Mars, Savoy, Steve Aoki, Diplo) head engineer and director of Studio DMI, Chris Gehringer (credits Jay Z, Madonna, Rihanna, Nelly, Nas, Joss Stone, Nelly Furtado) senior mastering engineer at Sterling Sound, NYC, “Oh my gosh, this room is amazing! You can literally hear everything!” and Mitch “Catalyst” Cohn, the musical director for Chris Brown’s world tour and Lady Gaga’s Monster Ball Tour, “This room sounds insane! I haven’t heard a room sound as good as this in a long time!”

I hope that goes some way to showing I am no quack

Thanks and speak tomorrow
Dennis

Chief Acoustic Engineer at Acousticfields.com. Listen to your music...without hearing your room!
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post #44 of 64 Old 08-05-2014, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Robert Jones II View Post
Dennis, in your video you use the analogy of the train that is on the wrong tracks, etc. Well in my case the train is still in the station. I am still trying to figure out how all of these pieces fit together. My priority right now is sound isolation. You seem to take issue with many of the techniques that are frequently discussed on these forums. A forum, by definition, is a place where ideas are exchanged. That being said, what practical advice can you offer to deal with isolation issues, especially at lower frequencies? Your suggestion to find a local acoustical engineer is probably sound advice, but it has no real practical value in the context of these forums and furthering the discussion.

You have mentioned on several occasions that small rooms can have big issues (reminder, mine is 13' 11"). I don't take you comments on this subject to be offensive or harsh by any means. It is just reality and commonly recognized in these forums. Your advice on many occasions (including in mine) has been to widen the room to help deal with those issues. But when I suggested that I might actually be able to widen my room, you came back and said no, you can't do that because then you'll deal with ceiling height issues. Okay, great, another road block. I get that this may be the nature of acoustics, small rooms, and rooms with ceilings that slope. Now, if you are saying that you think my situation is hopeless, then I would rather hear you say that. Otherwise, what types of solutions can you recommend? I don't think you have to give away the secret sauce to provide valuable feedback.

Most people on these forums inherently understand that the best thing one could do is hire an acoustical engineer to map out a solution for their space. Most people probably don't. And maybe some percentage of those regret it later. If your only advice is to hire an engineer then these forums may not be a good fit for you. I mean that in the most friendly way possible. But hiring an acoustical engineer has its own challenges. [In a Carrie Bradshaw kind of way: ] How can a person avoid being bamboozled by a self-proclaimed expert? What separates the quacks from the craftsman that really understands their craft and how to properly model a space?
Hi Robert,

Here are some further more specific guidelines and tests I think you should run with your space.

I hope it helps. As stated in the video I'd be happy to run your numbers against our database. If you want to fill in this form I'll be able to give you those numbers to get you started. Please detail as much as possible:
http://www.acousticfields.com/free-a...out-your-room/

Thanks
Dennis

Chief Acoustic Engineer at Acousticfields.com. Listen to your music...without hearing your room!
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post #45 of 64 Old 08-07-2014, 04:27 AM
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Damped Drywall (two layers of 5/8 with Green Glue) on isolation mounting is one key to containing the sound and subwoofer rumble. I've Built them that way many times and it works. Just another guy working in the industry with hands on theater experience.
You and hundreds others.. +1

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post #46 of 64 Old 08-07-2014, 10:23 AM
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Seeing and hearing is believing, get yourself to a properly built theater.
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post #47 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 12:14 AM
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Damped Drywall (two layers of 5/8 with Green Glue) on isolation mounting is one key to containing the sound and subwoofer rumble. I've Built them that way many times and it works. Just another guy working in the industry with hands on theater experience.
You and hundreds others.. +1
Low frequency energy produced by a sub woofer can be reduced but not contained. There are no absolutes when it comes to 30' and 40' wavelengths. Material density and application processes are numerous.You site one that is commonly used because it is cheap and easy to install. If your clients are happy with drywall and green glue, so be it. Mine would never be. They require a more thorough approach that takes into consideration both vibration and air borne energy issues along with their associated amplitudes.

This is the same paradigm and thinking process prevalent in the use of the word "sound proofing" which really has no meaning at all because of all the distortion assigned to it in the literature For every structure you can build, I guarantee you, I can drive air borne energy through it. Low frequency energy is about degrees of management. There is no containment.

I too, have built and tested over 100 rooms and there are much better vibration and pressure management techniques that can be applied for the same price point that achieve better results. Just because everyone does it and uses it, does not necessarily make it the best methodology.

Chief Acoustic Engineer at Acousticfields.com. Listen to your music...without hearing your room!
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post #48 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 02:36 AM
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Low frequency energy produced by a sub woofer can be reduced but not contained. There are no absolutes when it comes to 30' and 40' wavelengths. Material density and application processes are numerous.You site one that is commonly used because it is cheap and easy to install. If your clients are happy with drywall and green glue, so be it. Mine would never be. They require a more thorough approach that takes into consideration both vibration and air borne energy issues along with their associated amplitudes.

This is the same paradigm and thinking process prevalent in the use of the word "sound proofing" which really has no meaning at all because of all the distortion assigned to it in the literature For every structure you can build, I guarantee you, I can drive air borne energy through it. Low frequency energy is about degrees of management. There is no containment.

I too, have built and tested over 100 rooms and there are much better vibration and pressure management techniques that can be applied for the same price point that achieve better results. Just because everyone does it and uses it, does not necessarily make it the best methodology.
You are not giving any ideas on what is better, only that "something" (sounds like marketing ) else is better.

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post #49 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 05:34 AM
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You are not giving any ideas on what is better, only that "something" (sounds like marketing ) else is better.
Glenn there is a discernible level of ignorance in your response and as the king of marketing and self promotion in forums, that is a little rich coming from you. I really don't want to be involved in these sniping contests I've seen you apply in other forums. One customer contacted me to show me the attacks you had made on him in the Gearsluts forum. I found it quite distasteful that you would attack a member of the public like that. So I will not stoop to your level and engage in such behavior as I think it is demeaning. Suffice to say I will not be engaging with your comments again in future.

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post #50 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 05:52 AM
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Glenn there is a discernible level of ignorance in your response and as the king of marketing and self promotion in forums, that is a little rich coming from you. I really don't want to be involved in these sniping contests I've seen you apply in other forums. One customer contacted me to show me the attacks you had made on him in the Gearsluts forum. I found it quite distasteful that you would attack a member of the public like that. So I will not stoop to your level and engage in such behavior as I think it is demeaning. Suffice to say I will not be engaging with your comments again in future.
I have no idea what you are referring to about snipping but I am only pointing out about giving advise of how he should deal with the problem. No fight on my end just want to understand what you are talking about.
As far as Gearslutz anyone can go on there and see my 16K plus posts to see I do not snip at anyone. In fact there are many competitors, like Ethan Winer that are regulars, that we all get alone just fine. Sorry your visits there did not turn out the same for you.

Now lets get back to helping people vs trying to one up each other.

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post #51 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 06:18 AM
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Low frequency energy produced by a sub woofer can be reduced but not contained. There are no absolutes when it comes to 30' and 40' wavelengths. Material density and application processes are numerous.You site one that is commonly used because it is cheap and easy to install. If your clients are happy with drywall and green glue, so be it. Mine would never be. They require a more thorough approach that takes into consideration both vibration and air borne energy issues along with their associated amplitudes.
I hope you realize I was only talking about how to construct the walls, not how to address in room frequency response and decay times with bass traps, absorption and diffusion. My clients are not idiots.
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post #52 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
I hope you realize I was only talking about how to construct the walls, not how to address in room frequency response and decay times with bass traps, absorption and diffusion. My clients are not idiots.
Not calling your clients idiots for one second. You're moving the goal posts on the original point. We have been discussing green glue and drywall as a barrier technology with you stating "Damped Drywall (two layers of 5/8 with Green Glue) on isolation mounting is one key to containing the sound and subwoofer rumble. I've Built them that way many times and it works. Just another guy working in the industry with hands on theater experience." Unfortunately, we will have to agree to disagree on this point. I have tried this approach and I was so dissatisfied with the results that I sought other materials and construction methodologies.

Let's move on.

Chief Acoustic Engineer at Acousticfields.com. Listen to your music...without hearing your room!
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post #53 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 08:39 AM
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I'll avoid the personal stuff, and just point out that Green Glue is proven to work extremely well. One of the great things about Green Glue and the company behind it is they've done extensive testing, and the results are prominent on their web site. Not just STC which is meaningless for music rooms, but they show isolation versus frequency. Indeed, with isolation products, even more than absorbing products, lab data is the only acceptable evidence that a product works as advertised. If a company doen't show any isolation data, you can and should assume the worst.

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post #54 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 08:43 AM
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....SNIP.... I have tried this approach and I was so dissatisfied with the results that I sought other materials and construction methodologies.

Let's move on.
In the spirit of the forum .. Please share the details so that we may all benefit from your experience.

Many of us here have more than a casual interest/understanding of the physics involved and enjoy the discussions.

The "details" prevent the "drblank" type of threads mentioned from spiraling into meaningless banter.
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post #55 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 09:16 AM
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Dennis,

You are correct in that low frequency vibration is not 100% contained using the aforementioned construction methodologies. If I am correct, your method requires the use of 8 inch concrete walls, and two stud walls spaced quite a bit apart and various other barriers. The problem I see with that is that it requires an enormous use of space that most rooms don't have. The conclusion is reached that the client must get a bigger room. That isn't going to happen with 95% of the folks on this board, but I do agree that your method could be better to contain low frequency sound as long as those concrete walls use are isolated from the room. Concrete transfers sound throughout a structure quite efficiently.

Here is the thing though. Everyone is so concerned with sound leaving the room. That is not what sound isolation is all about; sound proofing,yes, isolation, no. Two distinct requirements. Isolation is about keeping noise from entering the room to lower the noise floor to 20 dB. Mechanicals in the home, cars, trucks, planes, trains, lawn mowers etc., produce sound, but certainly not on the levels that speakers produce in a room. On that basis, the conventional methods work just fine. If a low frequency wave truly wants to be stopped in its entirety, the walls would have to be 1/4 the wavelength of lowest frequency produced. We have to keep in perspective what isolation is all about. Even using Dennis' methods will not stop a low frequency wave entirely. It may lower it to a point that the resulting SPL is lost to background noise since we hear low frequencies different than mid range frequencies. If I get a client who expresses to me that sound must be contained, sound proofed, then there will be different methods used.

Shawn Byrne
Erskine Group
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post #56 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 09:18 AM
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Dennis has shared some of his methodologies on his web site.

http://www.acousticfields.com/soundproofing/

I actually did some research on the activated charcoal material properties (after seeing that) and there are independent studies documenting the sound absorbing characteristics and superior results at low frequencies. I'm not sure putting an absorbing wall on just one wall of the theater will keep the sound from the bedrooms. Certainly can improve the sound in the room.

On the barrier wall technologies poured concrete walls with living garden roof certainly is an effective barrier. Most of my projects are in poured foundation basements and the theater uses 2, 3 or 4 walls as the foundation and then a room within a room is constructed inside. I would like to see his recommendations for standard pre-existing construction and how he would implement a barrier on the ceiling and remaining walls.


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post #57 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Dennis has shared some of his methodologies on his web site.

http://www.acousticfields.com/soundproofing/

I actually did some research on the activated charcoal material properties (after seeing that) and there are independent studies documenting the sound absorbing characteristics and superior results at low frequencies. I'm not sure putting an absorbing wall on just one wall of the theater will keep the sound from the bedrooms. Certainly can improve the sound in the room.....
The RAL report shows the units tested, ACA10 and ACA12 as both being 72sq ft and 8.25" and 12" thick respectfully, weighing ~ 1100 -1200 lbs.... I would expect superior results from something of this size...


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post #58 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 11:02 AM - Thread Starter
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Here is the thing though. Everyone is so concerned with sound leaving the room. That is not what sound isolation is all about; sound proofing,yes, isolation, no. Two distinct requirements. Isolation is about keeping noise from entering the room to lower the noise floor to 20 dB.
I'm still learning my way through this stuff, so I'm sorry if I misspoke. To my pedestrian brain isolation meant both keeping sound in and keeping sound out. My 3-year old son's bedroom is the only room that connects directly to the theater room. In an ideal world I would want to be able to watch movies with him sleeping next door without having my wife worrying about whether we are going to wake him by watching an action movie (keeping sound in). On the other hand, I don't want to hear the kids next door playing basketball while I'm watching a dialogue-intense movie (keeping sound out). The slope ceiling may have less to do with either, and more to do with how the room is treated, but these are all concerns that I would like to have a clear plan for before beginning any sort of construction.

I suppose my thread title ought to be: Sound isolation, sound proofing, and how to treat a sloped ceiling room.
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post #59 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 12:03 PM
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The RAL report shows the units tested, ACA10 and ACA12 as both being 72sq ft and 8.25" and 12" thick respectfully, weighing ~ 1100 -1200 lbs.... I would expect superior results from something of this size...
Those are only effective at 50hz for absorption in the room. Unless you have a problem at only 50hz (that would be almost impossible) you are going to need other kinds of bass trapping to tame things. As far as sound blocking I see no numbers on that.

Quote:
I'll avoid the personal stuff, and just point out that Green Glue is proven to work extremely well. One of the great things about Green Glue and the company behind it is they've done extensive testing, and the results are prominent on their web site. Not just STC which is meaningless for music rooms, but they show isolation versus frequency. Indeed, with isolation products, even more than absorbing products, lab data is the only acceptable evidence that a product works as advertised. If a company doen't show any isolation data, you can and should assume the worst.

--Ethan
Plus one and hate the personal stuff also.

Glenn Kuras
GIK Acoustics


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post #60 of 64 Old 08-08-2014, 12:36 PM
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I'm still learning my way through this stuff, so I'm sorry if I misspoke. To my pedestrian brain isolation meant both keeping sound in and keeping sound out. My 3-year old son's bedroom is the only room that connects directly to the theater room. In an ideal world I would want to be able to watch movies with him sleeping next door without having my wife worrying about whether we are going to wake him by watching an action movie (keeping sound in). On the other hand, I don't want to hear the kids next door playing basketball while I'm watching a dialogue-intense movie (keeping sound out). The slope ceiling may have less to do with either, and more to do with how the room is treated, but these are all concerns that I would like to have a clear plan for before beginning any sort of construction.

I suppose my thread title ought to be: Sound isolation, sound proofing, and how to treat a sloped ceiling room.

Isolating the room will significantly reduce the amount of sound leaving the room. Sound isolation requirements outside the room is +3dB over ambient noise if done correctly. You'll have to determine what is more important...stopping low frequency waves (equals money and significant portions of your room being eaten for dead air space), or making the room quiet (~20dB) while significantly reducing the amount of sound leaving the room. Keep in mind, only the lowest frequencies will be transmitted, and often just a low rumble during dynamic low frequency reproduction (explosions, etc.)...if done right. That's the trick. Perhaps Dennis Erskine's paper on designing a home theater might help with some considerations.

http://erskine-group.com/wp-content/...e-Theaters.pdf


Getting to Big's mention of the activated carbon...the paper he dug up and shared with me is this:


http://usir.salford.ac.uk/23061/1/JASMAN1321239_1.pdf


There are very few scholarly papers written on the subject. It is a true peer reviewed white paper, and gets into the thermodynamics of activated carbon low frequency aborption and adsorption. If you don't like dealing with partial differential equations, here are the take home messages:


1. The absorption coefficient for activated carbon is 0.24 around 50 Hz. This is significantly higher than sand which 0.04. However, keeping this in perspective, 0.24 still isn't much.


2. The authors found that only specific types of activated carbon seem to achieve the results. They didn't go into great details of which, but I get the gist you can't go burn pallets in the backyard and stick it in your walls (although it works well for water filtration! )


3. The results seemed to surprise the authors, and no doubt further research is likely ongoing, but this area of acoustics is pretty young in the research department...so all the details are not yet in as to who, what, where, why and how. Your welcome to wait to build your room when all the research comes in!


4. It is an expensive solution compared to more conventional and cost effective means. Also, the cost of the solution, in my opinion, appears to yield diminishing results in cost vs. effectiveness. As I said, 0.24 isn't that much, but it is interesting. Not to say, that more material couldn't yield better results, but the cost also goes up along with it.


Just my two cents FWIW.

Shawn Byrne
Erskine Group
CEDIA Certified Professional EST II - HAA Level III Certified -THX Certified Professional


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