Soundproofing a Home Theater Room - Any Advice Appreciated - Page 2 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 6Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #31 of 56 Old 06-18-2014, 09:36 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renron View Post
BassthatHZ,
Yea! First poster that has mentioned Sound Board! Bonus points.
I have built music rooms in $10 Mill. + houses, where sound had to be absorbed, period.
It has been many years granted, technology has changed and new innovations in sound proofing have developed.
I am not currently active in building, so I can only share my older technology experiences.
We started with offset stud wall construction, room within a room style. The interior wall studs did not touch the exterior wall studs (nor the top/bottom plates), interior wall studs were centered in the gap of the exterior wall studs. On the interior wall we screwed 5/8" soundboard on the walls and ceiling, then had a company come in and blow fire retardant cellulose between the offset wall / ceiling spaces. Hole saw plugs were glued back in place. 5/8" sheetrock was then installed over the Sound Board. Wiring was completed and the 2 1/2" solid Mahogany door was hung. Similar to your design lighting was provided by torchieres and desk lamps.
That room was ~ 16'x30', I don't remember the dimensions exactly, but it was QUIET, inside and out.
I think it is easy to become overly focused on technology and the "latest and greatest" whatever the subject, and loose sight of why it works. Dead air space with sound absorption materials, the more the better. Decoupled from exterior structural members. KISS.

First off, MDF is NOT Multiple Density Fiberboard. It's Medium Density Fiberboard. There is also HDF, which is ungodly heavy and hernia inducing stuff.
Perhaps the poster was thinking of OSB? Oriented Strand Board.

Secondly, Don't all condoms come with a hole in one end? Otherwise it's a sealed tube. JK. Just pointing it out.

You had ceiling height to spare, should have gone with 2x6 instead of 2x4s. 2x4 just barely meet the load/span calculation tables for a 16" O/C 5lbs dead load with a deflection of //240. That said, 2x4s will work, don't forget to block them.

If you cut holes in the ceiling for speakers you will mitigate the sound proofing the ceiling affords, speakers send sound in both directions. Also the dispersant patterns of most in ceiling speakers will be "sweet spot" truncated.

Cinder block walls must be treated (I'm sure you know this) for sound reflections. Their mass is outstanding for sound deadening from the outside. If any portions of this room are below grade, you may have issues later with moisture penetration through the block wall, between the block and the false wall. Keep this in mind as you build.
Think about exterior drainage solutions away from the building.
Provide plenty of air circulation, especially air exchange. A sealed room will become stale, hot and humid without fresh air circulation.

Please post pictures.
Ron
General Contractor 35+ years
Mold Remediation Certified
Ron,

I really appreciate the insight. We double studded the ceiling every 4 feet to add to the load bearing strength. As for exterior drainage, that ship has long sailed. Although my basement does stay rather dray. As for the cinder block, I may paint it with a water barrier (I forget the name but I've used it before and it works well. I'm trying to figure out the ventilation now.

I will post pictures soon. I just finished running all the speaker wires and we are about to insulate and close the ceiling up (Hopefully it goes smoothly.)

The Doors (Yes there is more than 1, I know unfortunate) are about to be ordered, plan is Solid core wood doors, with insulated/weatherproof around the frames. If people think there are better doors please advise, however please keep in mind I cannot/will not be spending $3k for a heavy soundproof door.

Thanks again for everyone's help.
badger985 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 56 Old 06-18-2014, 09:50 PM
Member
 
Renron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by badger985 View Post
Ron,

I really appreciate the insight. We double studded the ceiling every 4 feet to add to the load bearing strength. As for exterior drainage, that ship has long sailed. Although my basement does stay rather dray. As for the cinder block, I may paint it with a water barrier (I forget the name but I've used it before and it works well. I'm trying to figure out the ventilation now.

I will post pictures soon. I just finished running all the speaker wires and we are about to insulate and close the ceiling up (Hopefully it goes smoothly.)

The Doors (Yes there is more than 1, I know unfortunate) are about to be ordered, plan is Solid core wood doors, with insulated/weatherproof around the frames. If people think there are better doors please advise, however please keep in mind I cannot/will not be spending $3k for a heavy soundproof door.

Thanks again for everyone's help.
We used to use Thoroseal for waterproofing concrete blocks below grade.
It gets pretty wet in Lake Tahoe area in the winter.
Never had a problem with it, may be better solutions today.
Your double doors will work splendidly,
You must be very excited to see your project starting to come to fruition.
Post Pics. .......please. I can live through your build.
My Home Theater is extremely modest. Spare room with overhead projector.
We're happy.
Ron

"New Member" since 2007....
Renron is offline  
post #33 of 56 Old 06-18-2014, 11:06 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Nightlord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Southern Sweden
Posts: 1,371
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked: 86
2x4 sounds very very thin to me. I have a 14½ foot span in mine and I went for 2x7 (42x180mm) gluelaminate which is the equivalent of 2x9 in wood. Had a friend run the numbers in their build engineering software to arrive to that. It will still 'sag' a tenth of an inch at the mid point. BTW, the spacing inbetween mine are 2'.

It might 'eat' some bass if it will be flexible enough to bend when pressurizing the room, which can be both good with regards to room modes, but may require more woofage for the same sound levels - and leak more bass.

Under construction: the Larch theater
Nightlord is offline  
post #34 of 56 Old 06-19-2014, 05:23 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,490
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Liked: 531
On these 2x4s. my Favorite line from Gravity "Houston, I have a bad feeling about this mission." The ceiling probably won't collapse, just sag.

Not a fan of soundboard or MLV either, but they have good marketing teams.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #35 of 56 Old 06-19-2014, 09:52 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Nightlord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Southern Sweden
Posts: 1,371
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
On these 2x4s. my Favorite line from Gravity "Houston, I have a bad feeling about this mission." The ceiling probably won't collapse, just sag.

Not a fan of soundboard or MLV either, but they have good marketing teams.
Agreed.

( I've actually bought some MLV this week, but I have a very different use for it than the advertised one. )

Under construction: the Larch theater
Nightlord is offline  
post #36 of 56 Old 06-19-2014, 05:13 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Update with Pictures

So you've asked for pictures and without further ado... The Badger Den

1st pic: Building out the 2nd stud wall, with the main entrance as you can see there are already double doors on the entry way, but we will be enclosing to a solid core 30 inch door inside, for a 2 door entry system, which will help with appearances from the outside and hopefully add better sound proofing elements.

2nd Pic: Is a picture of today, we put up all the insulation in the walls and Ceiling, and ran all the speaker wire and other wires around the room. All setup for 7.2 which is really all I think this room needs with it's size. But Have extra wires in the ceiling just in case along with extra Ethernet cable running to varies places in an attempt to future proof.

3rd Pic: is of the back wall and studs in front of the rock that is up between this room and the AV room, as you can see the massive amounts of cables in that bundle all things in the house lead to the AV room.

Up next --> ordering doors, Putting on the rest of the Putty Packs, Putting up MLV and rock. Then I believe the Linaccoustic on the front wall. Taping and mudding the rest of the rock and sound testing will of course be part of the process.

Thoughts are always welcome. As for the Ceiling, only time will tell, all the calculations I've looked at, in addition to my buddy who deserves a ton of credit for helping me move this project along and is a carpenter, the ceiling will work out just fine.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_2895.jpg (210.3 KB, 37 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_2907.jpg (227.0 KB, 36 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_2894.jpg (155.5 KB, 36 views)
badger985 is offline  
post #37 of 56 Old 06-20-2014, 04:25 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,490
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Liked: 531
Glad you are making progress.

I tend to build heavy ceilings with two or sometimes three layers of 5/8 drywall using green glue and isolation. I like the security of the ends of the ceiling joists sitting on something not resting in a metal channel where the the sides can bend and the attachment points fail. From what I see in the picture you missed an opportunity to decouple the new walls and from what I see the walls and ceiling will have firm mechanical connections to the existing ceiling structure which will transfer vibration.

I am a hard person to please finding things every day that I wish I had done differently in my own work so please don't take offense.

Last edited by BIGmouthinDC; 06-20-2014 at 04:31 AM.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #38 of 56 Old 06-21-2014, 08:24 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Glad you are making progress.

I tend to build heavy ceilings with two or sometimes three layers of 5/8 drywall using green glue and isolation. I like the security of the ends of the ceiling joists sitting on something not resting in a metal channel where the the sides can bend and the attachment points fail. From what I see in the picture you missed an opportunity to decouple the new walls and from what I see the walls and ceiling will have firm mechanical connections to the existing ceiling structure which will transfer vibration.

I am a hard person to please finding things every day that I wish I had done differently in my own work so please don't take offense.
Big, I don't take offense, and appreciate all your thoughts. As far as the decoupling? Please explain why you believe I missed an opportunity. Granted the pictures are not great but all the internal walls are separated by at least 1 inch from the other studs, and the ceiling is completely separated from the ceiling joists above with air and insulation between. Please explain so I can make sure I didn't screw something up. Thanks
badger985 is offline  
post #39 of 56 Old 06-21-2014, 08:47 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,490
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Liked: 531
can you take a close up picture of the top plate of the new inner walls? they look like they are firmly attached to the ceiling joists.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #40 of 56 Old 06-21-2014, 09:00 AM
AVS Special Member
 
doublewing11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Timber Country!
Posts: 3,327
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 193
Well,

I'm really late to the party but am compelled to address issue about difficulties concerning Green Glue application with DD. Comment is mainly for those new to soundproofing.........


The only difficult part of applying and building a DD system is when actually standing around with a bunch of men commenting about the consistency and action of Green Glue coming out of tube. Believe me when I say this........."Don't shoot from the hip!" Well, at least not around 5-6 men who have never seen product applied!
doublewing11 is offline  
post #41 of 56 Old 06-21-2014, 09:22 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
can you take a close up picture of the top plate of the new inner walls? they look like they are firmly attached to the ceiling joists.
Big I will take a picture when I get he tomorrow evening. However what you are seeing is it firmly attached to the inner ceiling that was created and not attached to the above ceiling joists.
badger985 is offline  
post #42 of 56 Old 06-21-2014, 11:28 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Nightlord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Southern Sweden
Posts: 1,371
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublewing11 View Post
Well,

I'm really late to the party but am compelled to address issue about difficulties concerning Green Glue application with DD. Comment is mainly for those new to soundproofing.........


The only difficult part of applying and building a DD system is when actually standing around with a bunch of men commenting about the consistency and action of Green Glue coming out of tube. Believe me when I say this........."Don't shoot from the hip!" Well, at least not around 5-6 men who have never seen product applied!
Hand lotion would be the closest thing in consistency until the GG starts to set. Then it gets closer to chewing gum or so.... That's at least my best attempt at a description. Just stated on my 4th pail...

Under construction: the Larch theater
Nightlord is offline  
post #43 of 56 Old 06-21-2014, 10:16 PM
Member
 
Renron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 15
BMDC,
Micro lambs are the best, hands down. I would not have used 2x4s either, 2x6s minimum on a very tight budget.
Sound board wise, I'm sure there are better alternatives on today's market.
Do keep in mind when advising, and this is not a knock, not everyone has an unlimited budget and sometimes we have to cut here to afford there. I'm sure you're advising the best possible products and from what I've seed construction methods as well.
Champagne tastes on beer budget. That's me, except I don't drink. My budget is now Ice water. Retired. But lovin' my HT on the cheap.
Ron

"New Member" since 2007....
Renron is offline  
post #44 of 56 Old 06-22-2014, 03:53 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Also a construction tip, position the new joists up in the joist space before framing your new walls. Tack them out of the way somehow. Build the walls and then lower the new joists into position.
That's an outstanding tip.

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
post #45 of 56 Old 06-22-2014, 04:01 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Lets start at the beginning. what size secondary ceiling joists can you fit in the available space? If the ends sit on decoupled walls you are right you can skip clips channel etc.
Do you have a drawing or picture of how the ends of the joists sit on the walls? Are you notching the joists and/or using hangers? If so, how do you get the new joists mainly into the existing joist bay while maximizing contact with the walls (which are one inch shorter than the existing joists) and preventing the new joists from twisting?

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
post #46 of 56 Old 06-22-2014, 04:26 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,490
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Liked: 531
You sit the joist on the top plate of the wall which is one inch under the existing ceiling joists, no notching.
You drive screws from underneath the top plate up into the new joists
If you have a high degree of OCD you can also use some angle brackets on the sides of the new joists and top of the top plate.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #47 of 56 Old 06-22-2014, 05:18 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Nightlord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Southern Sweden
Posts: 1,371
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked: 86
I used 4" angle brackets on both sides of the joists myself. Put all mine on top of standing joists, so screwing from below wasn't an option as I'm no fan of screwing at an angle.

Under construction: the Larch theater
Nightlord is offline  
post #48 of 56 Old 06-22-2014, 05:47 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Thank you both. That makes sense. I think I'd also use angle brackets. I used some angle brackets for five different ceiling fans I installed, on a wood piece that spans two joists and holds the ceiling fan box for each fan. I used 3 brackets per side, 24 screws total. Those ceiling fans will only come down if the house comes down.

The hard part for my house will be removing/rerouting wiring and getting around other obstacles such as a ventilation run, in order to get the space to run additional new joists between the current joists. This is an attractive option, though, as you only lose an inch and don't have to go to the expense of channels and clips.

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
post #49 of 56 Old 06-22-2014, 09:30 AM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,490
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Liked: 531
If you have a nice level and even set of joists to begin with you can shave that inch to a half an inch, just so there is a gap. You can set up a laser level and walk around the room with a stick. Push it up to the joists holding it straight up and down and make a mark where the laser hits the stick, then walk around the room checking each joist at the ends and the middle. you will quickly get a feel for how much variance there is in the room.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #50 of 56 Old 06-22-2014, 03:52 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Thank you for that advice. At about the middle of the current joists, there is a piece of wood between each set of joists. I assume this is an anti-twisting device. For the two runs with heat/AC "conduit" (can't remember its name right now), they used metal spacers to space a set of joists. Obviously, these pieces of wood have to go, but is it possible to replace them to avoid twisting of the current joists? Or do you just take them out and forget about them?

Also, what do you do for some heat/AC runs? I have two of these in some joist space. I assume you could make the new joists go near one end of the current sets of joists, but is this how you do it?

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
post #51 of 56 Old 06-25-2014, 07:48 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I apologize, I have been tied up on some stuff.

Big Mouth Thank you. You were correct half of that wall was not decoupled (It was from the prior build and we went off of it) So much for that. Anyway We used resilient channel's on that wall, the other three walls we built and are completely stand alone, not what I wanted but didn't feel like cutting the top of the other half of the first wall.)

My questions now are

1. has anyone used MLV instead of Linnaccoustic RC for the front wall? Will it do the same thing? I will likely have some MLV left over and would rather use that and save the money if they have the same sound killing properties for a front wall.

2. What is the proper width in between Back Speakers on a 12 foot back wall. Currently they are planning to be 3 feet off the walls on each side and roughly 6 feet between them on the back wall.

3. I will get some more pictures up in a few days. I appreciate the help from everyone. Btw, I was reading 2x4 weight bearing load, and by putting 2 of them together it more than triples the weight capacity.

4. how much Caulk are you suppose to use at the bottom of the rock on the floor where there is a 1/2 inch space, are you suppose to fill in the entire cavity under the rock as well?

Also has anyone ever tried sandwiching MLV between two sheets of Rock? It's a thought I've had on doing. Thanks.
badger985 is offline  
post #52 of 56 Old 06-25-2014, 08:49 PM
HOME THEATER CONTRACTOR
 
BIGmouthinDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 20,490
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Liked: 531
What is the NRC of the MLV you intend to use as an absorber instead of the Linacoustic? Two entirely different uses.

Caulk the gap at the bottom of the wall under the drywall until until it is sealed tight.
BIGmouthinDC is online now  
post #53 of 56 Old 07-03-2014, 09:29 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Next Question.

So I am configuring the stage - and trying to get an idea of Front Speaker Height. My Center channel will be placed roughly around 28-30 inches off the ground. as the stage/front panel will be roughly 32 inches high and will have six inches of sand at the base. (Is this enough sand or too much?)

My real question is for Left & Right Front speakers. If I place them on the stage standing , thus starting at a height of 32 inches which will make the tweeter and be at a placement of approximately 53 - 65 inches will this be too high for sitting people that will roughly be at 54 inches when seated including the riser?
--- additionally will there be to much space between the height of the L & R and the center at 30 inches?

Thanks for any insight.
badger985 is offline  
post #54 of 56 Old 07-10-2014, 05:04 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
UPDATES -->

So the walls are all closed. Ended up Double rocking two of the walls, the one that goes against the staircase and the entry door wall. From preliminary test's the results seem to be positive. The Double studded walls and the resilient channel on the half detached double studded wall seem to have accomplished the desired decoupled affect as the vibrations are no longer felt outside the Theater room. Also there has not been any sound that has seeped into the theater room as I've been working, and that's even with the new doors not intalled yet, so that is extremely positive.

The riser (A small 6 inch one) that is the length of the back of the room and 1/2 inch away from all three walls (Thanks to these boards) has been created and stuffed with the remaining insulation I had and am finishing closing it up tomorrow., Next the stage. Moulding has been ordered.

Still on the fence about HVAC however we have designated a place in the room that a air-conditioner can be attached if necessary, however it's been pretty good so far and working in 85-90 degree heat should be a decent test.

I have attached some pics of the drywall (Taped and Mudded) and the riser before insulation finished.

If I have one thing I would say I would do differently already (and I will compile a list at the end, it is to hang a bigger ceiling that rests above the new walls as BIG mentioned, that way I could double rock without concern if I feel it necessary. However the current ceiling seems to be doing well but we will not tell until doors are in.

Next up - I have just finished painting the ceiling and primed the walls and will finish the painting hopefully in the next 2 days. Linnaccoustic on the front wall, bass traps in the corners, Doors have been ordered and should be here by next week, and the lights are on there way as well (4 sconces) have been ordered. Finally the stage. Even working pretty consistently this stuff is a time consuming process.

Thanks again for the help.
badger985 is offline  
post #55 of 56 Old 07-10-2014, 05:15 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
badger985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Riser

pic of the riser before insulation and top
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_2934.jpg (137.5 KB, 15 views)
badger985 is offline  
post #56 of 56 Old 07-10-2014, 08:39 PM
Senior Member
 
JThiessen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
For doors check out melamine fire rated doors. Very dense, relatively inexpensive compared to steel or solid wood. I think I paid about 300 for my 32" garage entry door (full exterior type with sill), and 80 for the 32" slab I put in the laundry room entry (right next to the theater room).
JThiessen is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off