Apply Green Glue on bottom of 1st DW Layer? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 07:52 AM - Thread Starter
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Apply Green Glue on bottom of 1st DW Layer?

I wanted to see if anyone has ever applied Green Glue to the bottom of the 1st Layer of Ceiling Drywall after it is hung... and then the 2nd layer is applied?

It seems like the traditional way, is to put it on the back side of the 2nd layer of drywall, then lift that into place and install on the 1st layer.

I had two drywall contractors out last week, and they both said they would prefer not have their people waiting around as I put the GG on the 2nd Layer of DW. So, they both suggested I apply the GG to the bottom of the 1st layer of DW, and then their guys come and hang the drywall over it, as soon as I was done applying it.

I assume if this works, then doing that on the walls would work too, right?

Thoughts? Seems like it should work, but wanted to get others opinions. I wondered if it might even be better since then wouldn't have to keep it from the 'edges' of the Boards??
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post #2 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 08:05 AM
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So you're saying they hang a sheet and then you apply? That would be messsssssssy I would think. You'd get a ton of drippage from the ceiling and getting green glue in your hair is no fun.

It takes literally 30 seconds tops to empty a speed loader filled with green glue onto a sheet of drywall once you get fast at it... Is his crew THAT efficient that they can't wait 60 seconds or so extra per sheet?

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post #3 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 08:12 AM
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Sounds great, except for that pesky gravity!!


This is an interesting idea in theory, but I think it would end up a disaster in reality. A few things:
1 - GG isn't intended to be applied with a trowel/taping knife - you need to use the applicator gun and I think you're going to have a hard time getting it onto your ceiling.
2 - While GG doesn't "dry," it sounds like there will be some time between your application and the hanging of the drywall. That doesn't sound ideal.
3 - The mess. I think the proposed method would leave you with a bunch of GG on the floor/slab/whatever. Then drywallers are going to be cursing you when they're walking through it. And when you're shaving your head after getting a glop in your hair, you're seriously going to regret going this route.


If your contractor is that worried about speed, buy an extra applicator and promise a friend some beer. 2x the speed on the back of the sheets.

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post #4 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 08:24 AM
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Give the guys in the field an extra Benjamin Franklin that will stop their bitching!

Sheet rockers must be clueless with their recommendation and have never seen GG applied. Sure, takes extra time in the trade so an extra Franklin is fair enough. Anymore than that you're over paying.
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post #5 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 08:28 AM
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post #6 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 08:58 AM
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^I sense you're on the fence. Maybe we should talk this out?

(I fully agree. This is a bad idea.)
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post #7 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 09:03 AM
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So they won't wait for you to apply to the new sheet, but he's cool waiting for you to apply to the ceiling?
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post #8 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 09:39 AM
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The contractors are working in some entertainment for themselves it seems. What a disaster that would be with GG dripping everywhere. It's too heavy and too loose a substance to just stick to the ceiling... it WILL drip.

How about they apply the GG to the backside of the drywall under your supervision? They're pros so should be able to handle it.
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post #9 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 09:59 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat View Post
So they won't wait for you to apply to the new sheet, but he's cool waiting for you to apply to the ceiling?
I am finishing my whole basement... so, the theater room is about 450 square feet of the 2,200 square feet... they were going to work in the other rooms, while I applied to the ceiling.

Based on all the consistent, aligned feedback, I'll state this is not an options!!
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post #10 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 10:06 AM
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My drywallers called it "guacomole."

I applied it to each sheet in about 30secs....I got good enough that they didn't have to wait on me. They laughed about it the whole time.

5+ years later, it is still incredibly sticky...less liquid and more solid but definitely still a pain if you get it on you.

There is no way on earth you'd be able to apply it correctly on vertical surfaces, much less horizontally above your head....the mess would be catastrophic.

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post #11 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 11:11 AM
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Other things contractors may not want to do

use 5/8 heavy versus the newer light weight crap.
Stagger All the seams This means planning the ceiling in advance as the first sheet you throw up may not be a full one, you want to plan the second layer so the seams are where you want them.
Install in Ceiling, Wall, Ceiling, wall sequence
Use the right length screws if you are using clips and channel, you will need to buy in advance because they will never show up with the right length. 1 1/4 and 2 inch screws.
Caulk all the inside corners of the first layer before the second goes up. Wall/ceiling and Wall/Wall inside corners.
Make sure that when the first ceiling sheets go up that they maintain at least a 1/4 inch gap between the edges and the vertical framing.
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post #12 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Make sure that when the first ceiling sheets go up that they maintain at least a 1/4 inch gap between the edges and the vertical framing.
Is this part as important against walls that are decoupled from the house (eg, IB3 clips?)

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post #13 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 01:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemsonJeeper View Post
Is this part as important against walls that are decoupled from the house (eg, IB3 clips?)
Your walls are moving ie. flexing.......think of sealing intersection of two planes along with acoustic caulk as a miniature shock absorber which keeps joint sealed.
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post #14 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 01:18 PM
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Hmmm... Interesting point.

I didn't take this into account when laying out my ceiling channels, which is why I ask. I put my first channel @ 24" from the vertical framing (not including the extra channel @ 7" for the edge).

So it seems like I'm going to have to shave 1/4 or so off the entire length of each board going against that wall? hrmm.. that's going to stink.

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post #15 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 01:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Other things contractors may not want to do
Make sure that when the first ceiling sheets go up that they maintain at least a 1/4 inch gap between the edges and the vertical framing.
Sorry but I'm a n00b at construction. What does that mean "between the edges of the ceiling sheet and the vertical framing"? Do you mean the ceiling sheets that are at the perimeter need to be left 1/4" short of the vertical drywall and then that gap is filled with silicone to allow for flex?
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post #16 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
Other things contractors may not want to do

use 5/8 heavy versus the newer light weight crap.
Stagger All the seams This means planning the ceiling in advance as the first sheet you throw up may not be a full one, you want to plan the second layer so the seams are where you want them.
Install in Ceiling, Wall, Ceiling, wall sequence
Use the right length screws if you are using clips and channel, you will need to buy in advance because they will never show up with the right length. 1 1/4 and 2 inch screws.
Caulk all the inside corners of the first layer before the second goes up. Wall/ceiling and Wall/Wall inside corners.
Make sure that when the first ceiling sheets go up that they maintain at least a 1/4 inch gap between the edges and the vertical framing.
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post #17 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 01:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemsonJeeper View Post
Hmmm... Interesting point.

I didn't take this into account when laying out my ceiling channels, which is why I ask. I put my first channel @ 24" from the vertical framing (not including the extra channel @ 7" for the edge).

So it seems like I'm going to have to shave 1/4 or so off the entire length of each board going against that wall? hrmm.. that's going to stink.
Great question... I am going to be doing my clips & channel soon, and although I kind of 'knew' of the 1/4" thing, I hadn't considered the impact on channel spacing.

Won't that then also be an issue on the 2nd layer? Then, you'll be butting the Drywall up against the 1st layer of wall-board... so, shifting it over even further?
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post #18 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 03:38 PM
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I am not referring to drywall to drywall I am referring to the first layer on the ceiling. When I was working with this crew the first sheet they started to hang they pushed tight to the left and front wall framing. So the clips and channel which provide a spring action were short circuited by the firm contact of the drywall to wood framing, I had them bring it down and I inserted some scrap spacers that were pulled out after the sheet was hung, the rest of the ceiling I had to watch each sheet to make sure is wasn't rubbing the wall framing.
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post #19 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 04:35 PM
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Ok that makes sense now. Basically you don't want that corner sheet up to the vertical studs because now you've coupled the drywall directly to the studs thereby defeating the purpose of the hat channels and clips in the first place. Drywall to drywall contact at the horizontal and vertical is ok as long as no other part of the drywall is touching a stud.

So then since all the DW is truly "floating" and will flex, is there going to be an issue with corner seams opening up due to flex? I suppose you could hide it with a soffit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
I am not referring to drywall to drywall I am referring to the first layer on the ceiling. When I was working with this crew the first sheet they started to hang they pushed tight to the left and front wall framing. So the clips and channel which provide a spring action were short circuited by the firm contact of the drywall to wood framing, I had them bring it down and I inserted some scrap spacers that were pulled out after the sheet was hung, the rest of the ceiling I had to watch each sheet to make sure is wasn't rubbing the wall framing.
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post #20 of 20 Old 07-21-2014, 04:45 PM
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you caulk the corners with flexible acoustical caulk.
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