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Old 08-27-2014, 10:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Before I contact Ted White/Soundproofingcompany

What kind of information (and level of detail) should I come prepared with so I don't waste anyone's time?
I have a plan, sound proofing approaches and fairly accurate measurements. Is this level of detail good enough for them to start quoting materials and answering questions? Diagram attached for the below points:


A & B: Existing walls. 1" gap from foundation. Insulated. Fixed to joists. I plan to use RSIC-1 clips/channels, DD+GG (1st layer OSB)
C & D: New Walls to be build. 1" shorter than joists, IB-3 clips to secure to joists. DD+GG (1st layer OSB)
E & F: Not sure how to secure the new decoupled walls to the existing coupled perpendicular walls. IB-3 clips as well?
G Ducts heading upstairs, hangs down same distance as existing steel beam, so will create soffit.
Should I decouple soffit from joists/wall or just use standard clips/channel DD+GG technique?
I: Riser, post bunker. Non-reclining seats, filled with pink fluffy
H: Will create new soffit inside theater for HVAC and conduit, post bunker
J: Stage, filled with sand, no hidden wall/AT screen, post bunker
K: Solid Core door using 2x6 for frame.
L: Maybe build dead vent along outside of room in the office and connect to existing return
M: Not sure where to pull air from. Maybe run it past the door and build a dead vent there?

Misc:
Floors: dimpled plastic Delta-FL + OSB + under pad + carpet
Electrical boxes: Putty pads
Pot lights: Will construct backer boxes
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Old 08-27-2014, 10:36 AM
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Yup. Just your overall dimensions of your walls, and your ceiling. joist spacing, how many layers of drywall you are planning on using.

John is ridiculously fast at calculating how many IB3 clips and WhisperClip (what I used) you will need. Also the amount of GG you will need too.

For all walls you are rebuilding, you use IB3 clips to decouple from the ceiling. You may need to install blocking if it falls between joists.

Sounds like your question regarding soffit & question H contradict eachother. You want to build your soundproof shell then hang the soffits in that using lightweight soffit building techniques. For the soffits that run parallel to the ceiling channels, you will want to install a dedicated channel just to hang the soffit from (make sure you take into account the DD width when figuring out where to mount your channel in the ceiling) For the soffits that run perpendicular to your channels, just make sure you hit all your channels when hanging it.

My Home Theater Build: The Vortex Theater Build
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Old 08-27-2014, 10:44 AM
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Also how do you plan on orienting your theater? You ideally want the return in the back and the supplies near the front.

You can use a dead vent or use soffit mufflers depending on location.

My Home Theater Build: The Vortex Theater Build
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Old 08-27-2014, 01:49 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by ClemsonJeeper View Post
Sounds like your question regarding soffit & question H contradict eachother. You want to build your soundproof shell then hang the soffits in that using lightweight soffit building techniques. .
The soffit by G. can't be constructed inside the shell because of the duct work that I need to cover up. The Soffit in H will be inside the shell as you described to even out the room and run HVAC.

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Also how do you plan on orienting your theater? You ideally want the return in the back and the supplies near the front.
You can use a dead vent or use soffit mufflers depending on location.
I've decided to do the screen on the left side. Its much more appealing to me to walk into the back of the theater. I'll be shaving off some riser width, but I can live with that

Left side
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Old 08-27-2014, 04:28 PM
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The soffit by G. can't be constructed inside the shell because of the duct work that I need to cover up. The Soffit in H will be inside the shell as you described to even out the room and run HVAC.
Got it. Yes, you will want to decouple the soffit framing then. Either by using clips + channel or by framing it using IB3 clips. I'm honestly not sure which is preferable - I'm sure one of the more experienced builders in this forum can help with that.


Quote:
I've decided to do the screen on the left side. Its much more appealing to me to walk into the back of the theater. I'll be shaving off some riser width, but I can live with that

Left side
That looks like a good plan, it seems to be more pleasing to walk into the rear of a theater than the front. If you could move the doors to the equipment room, you could have the entry door swing out into the entry area and then look into doing a less intrusive riser design.

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Old 08-28-2014, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by mikeyd17 View Post
What kind of information (and level of detail) should I come prepared with so I don't waste anyone's time?
They will walk through it. Not much help on speakers or acoustics since that's not what they do, but as far as building a soundproof shell they will tell you everything you need to know. It's going to be centered around what products to buy from them and how to install them, but if you want to soundproof your room you have to buy the stuff from someone. Might as well be a company that provides great support. They have free documentation available (SIM guides) that are more detailed and better illustrated than some plans you pay for.

The one thing I would caution is your budget. If it's tight, let them know. Diminishing returns apply. If you go in wanting the best, they're going to give you the best. If you're on a budget, there are a lot of things they can do to drop the price without loosing much performance.

One other thing to keep in mind is that a number of their solutions are work arounds for less than ideal decisions made while building the room. You can save yourself the expense of having to use many of their solutions by avoiding the problem in the first place.

For example, if your room is big enough, you can put 99% of everything you need inside of the shell. Lights can go in a soffit inside the room, on columns built within the room, or into the "beam" sections of a coffered ceiling. That avoids having to use backer boxes for lights. Similarly speakers can go on the walls covered by fabric or in columns. That avoids backer boxes for speakers. Wiring can terminate into surface mounted receptacles to avoid having to wrap conventional outlets with putty pads. In general, minimize the number and size of the penetrations into the room, so you don't have to buy putty pads & backer boxes. Similar for air circulation... plan on having forced air HVAC drops & a return in the theater so you don't have to build a dead vent. Treat footfall noise on the source side, so you don't have to resort to laborious methods to fix after the fact.

 

 

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Old 08-29-2014, 07:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by rabident View Post
They will walk through it. Not much help on speakers or acoustics since that's not what they do, but as far as building a soundproof shell they will tell you everything you need to know. It's going to be centered around what products to buy from them and how to install them, but if you want to soundproof your room you have to buy the stuff from someone. Might as well be a company that provides great support. They have free documentation available (SIM guides) that are more detailed and better illustrated than some plans you pay for.

The one thing I would caution is your budget. If it's tight, let them know. Diminishing returns apply. If you go in wanting the best, they're going to give you the best. If you're on a budget, there are a lot of things they can do to drop the price without loosing much performance.

One other thing to keep in mind is that a number of their solutions are work arounds for less than ideal decisions made while building the room. You can save yourself the expense of having to use many of their solutions by avoiding the problem in the first place.

For example, if your room is big enough, you can put 99% of everything you need inside of the shell. Lights can go in a soffit inside the room, on columns built within the room, or into the "beam" sections of a coffered ceiling. That avoids having to use backer boxes for lights. Similarly speakers can go on the walls covered by fabric or in columns. That avoids backer boxes for speakers. Wiring can terminate into surface mounted receptacles to avoid having to wrap conventional outlets with putty pads. In general, minimize the number and size of the penetrations into the room, so you don't have to buy putty pads & backer boxes. Similar for air circulation... plan on having forced air HVAC drops & a return in the theater so you don't have to build a dead vent. Treat footfall noise on the source side, so you don't have to resort to laborious methods to fix after the fact.
Thanks for the info! My budget is tight, so I'll make sure to let them know.

Couple questions:

1) "or into the "beam" sections of a coffered ceiling"
How much height does recessed lighting need? I am working with 8' ceiling, (minus clips/channel, DD, a riser) so headroom is at a premium.

2) "Wiring can terminate into surface mounted receptacles to avoid having to wrap conventional outlets with putty pads"
So this would be running the electrical wires through the soundproof shell and then mounting an outlet on top of the drywall so to speak? Or another option would be use conventional outlets, but mount them inside columns?

3) "forced air HVAC drops & a return in the theater so you don't have to build a dead vent"
Not sure what you mean by this? Isnt the dead vent to isolate the noise from the forced air drops/return?
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Old 08-30-2014, 06:08 AM
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1) I'm not sure the exact height, but they are pretty tall. It may not work for you if space is tight. Here is a build thread that shows the can lights in the "beams" in detail (bottom pics in the post). The Withrow Build (Erskine Design - Equipment from everywhere)

2) Yes & yes. Not just outlets. They have surface mount boxes for almost all types of wiring. You can also surface mount the wires, hiding them behind the interior room trim. But ask your electrician / structured wiring guy to make sure whatever you do is safe & meets code.

3) Normally the "dead" in dead vent refers to the lack of mechanical force moving air through the vent. Nothing to do with deadening the sound. It's intended to provide a passive path between the walls for air to flow from one room to the next. Soundproofing company offers a way to help soundproof the dead vent if you need to use one. But you're better off having your HVAC contractor design the system so you don't need to dump/pull air from an adjacent space in the first place. He will do that by putting dedicated supply(s) and a return(s) into the theater. There are some common ways to deaden the sound coming through the HVAC system into the room, but you don't use a "dead vent" to do it. That link above shows what Ben's HVAC contractor came up with to meet the low noise requirement his plans called for.

 

 

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Old 08-30-2014, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by mikeyd17 View Post
Thanks for the info! My budget is tight, so I'll make sure to let them know.
Rabident has supplied excellent advice.
Have you made some quick calculations on the price of sound proofing? You probably should so you don't gasp when you get the quote. I still believe it is a worthwhile venture if you have a previous history of enjoying home theater, have the money, and don't plan on moving any time soon. I did some rough calculations on a small 11'X19' room and came to over $3000 before HVAC. All those little components add up quickly. This was for a corner basement room, using two double walls and a suspended joist ceiling (cheaper than clips & channel). The difference in a 4x8 panel alone was $55. (Two tubes of green glue $35, two sheets of 5/8" drywall $40, minus price of one sheet of 1/2 drywall.) Granted, I live in Canada so things tend to be more expensive.

Last edited by DavidK442; 08-30-2014 at 06:30 AM.
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Old 08-30-2014, 03:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by rabident View Post
1) I'm not sure the exact height, but they are pretty tall. It may not work for you if space is tight. Here is a build thread that shows the can lights in the "beams" in detail (bottom pics in the post). The Withrow Build (Erskine Design - Equipment from everywhere)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabident View Post
2) Yes & yes. Not just outlets. They have surface mount boxes for almost all types of wiring. You can also surface mount the wires, hiding them behind the interior room trim. But ask your electrician / structured wiring guy to make sure whatever you do is safe & meets code.
Very cool. I plan to learn/do the majority of the electrical work but hopefully I can find, and more importantly, understand the local code.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabident View Post
3) Normally the "dead" in dead vent refers to the lack of mechanical force moving air through the vent. Nothing to do with deadening the sound. It's intended to provide a passive path between the walls for air to flow from one room to the next. Soundproofing company offers a way to help soundproof the dead vent if you need to use one. But you're better off having your HVAC contractor design the system so you don't need to dump/pull air from an adjacent space in the first place. He will do that by putting dedicated supply(s) and a return(s) into the theater. There are some common ways to deaden the sound coming through the HVAC system into the room, but you don't use a "dead vent" to do it. That link above shows what Ben's HVAC contractor came up with to meet the low noise requirement his plans called for.
I'm planning on learning/doing the HVAC as well. My plan so far was to use dedicated fans to pull/push air from the cool basement.
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Old 08-30-2014, 04:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Rabident has supplied excellent advice.
Have you made some quick calculations on the price of sound proofing? You probably should so you don't gasp when you get the quote. I still believe it is a worthwhile venture if you have a previous history of enjoying home theater, have the money, and don't plan on moving any time soon. I did some rough calculations on a small 11'X19' room and came to over $3000 before HVAC. All those little components add up quickly. This was for a corner basement room, using two double walls and a suspended joist ceiling (cheaper than clips & channel). The difference in a 4x8 panel alone was $55. (Two tubes of green glue $35, two sheets of 5/8" drywall $40, minus price of one sheet of 1/2 drywall.) Granted, I live in Canada so things tend to be more expensive.
I read a few threads that said expect to pay on average $3000-$3500 for soundproofing, so your story checks out! I plan to live in my house for some time (its brand new) so building a sound isolated room is worth the money at this point. If I run out of money, I'll just delay the a/v equipment purchases. I'm also in Canada
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Old 09-01-2014, 07:13 PM - Thread Starter
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Got it. Yes, you will want to decouple the soffit framing then. Either by using clips + channel or by framing it using IB3 clips. I'm honestly not sure which is preferable - I'm sure one of the more experienced builders in this forum can help with that.
I'm a visual learner I've attached images on how I think I should go about tackling the soffits, let me know what you think.
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