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post #1 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 07:39 AM - Thread Starter
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HT Room Size Advice

Before I post my long thread with all details, I was hoping someone could give some thoughts on the ideal size for my room. I have a 27x14.5x8 foot area in my basement. The walls are cinder block and below ground on three sides (ceiling is unfinished, exposed studs and insulation). The side that is open has a 10 foot cinder block wall in the exact middle (housing furnace). I plan on fully closing off the other openings (with the very necessary entry door in one)! There will be zero ambient light.

Before I even get to later questions about gear and build specs, I wanted to know if anyone had opinions on the room size and shape. Specifically, I would like the largest screen possible, and am looking right now at 135" Diagonal Silver Ticket, which would go on the short wall. I also want to be able to sit relatively close to the screen (probably inside the recommended 15-16 ft), as I want to replicate the true theater experience of being fully "inside" of the screen, or at least have that option.

I was originally looking at a standard white or gray screen, but am now thinking about an AT screen front wall that I can put speakers and gear behind.

Lastly, I'm probably going to do this thing pretty incrementally. It's a house warming present for my retiring mother, who simply lives and dies movies. I'm visiting her for the month, and I think I'll use this time to get the gear and lay the groundwork, but probably not do any finish-level construction work. If the room is great sound and picture wise with the lights off, I think it might also encourage my mom to let me go the full distance at a later date (I'm about to go overseas for up to a year for work so its simply unreasonable to think I can finish a room in that time).

Lastly, I have a general procedural question that I hope you can help with, and that is how I should consult AVS for this process. Is it better to put everything here in the HT thread or go into individual forums for specific questions (subwoofer, speakers, etc.)?

Thanks in advance for any thoughts!
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post #2 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 07:46 AM - Thread Starter
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I guess I should add that I may also be upscaling gear over time, and so will probably put this together with an eye to the future.

I'm using some of my own older stuff for now, and am going to use what I have piecemeal until I can assemble the ideal stuff (I have a center channel and 4 surrounds but my towers and sub are elsewhere). So for questions like Atmos capability, I would say, yes, ideally for the future, but not yet.

(For example, I have a Onkyo TX-NR905 that has a fried HDMI board that ONKYO has offered to trade-in for 50-60% off retail (they quoted me $693 for the TX-RZ900 but that is probably more machine than I need).

I also want to keep my budget pretty low at this time because mom might not love it (I'll happily claim/reclaim any gear!).
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post #3 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 07:56 AM
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seating- single or double row?

A single row theater with an acoustically transparent screen, hidden speakers and a couple feet behind the seating is around 18 ft long. Add 6 1/2 feet for two rows. Assuming the door is in the right location.
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post #4 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 08:04 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
seating- single or double row?

A single row theater with an acoustically transparent screen, hidden speakers and a couple feet behind the seating is around 18 ft long. Add 6 1/2 feet for two rows. Assuming the door is in the right location.
Definitely two rows. Maybe some pillow type seating in front of both for overspill/kids.

I'm pretty flexible on putting the door either near the screen or the back.

One other consideration I forgot to question is whether I have TOO much depth. If not, I could easily put a bar or a table setup with stools in the rear.
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post #5 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 08:12 AM
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I think you've answered your own question make the room the full size of the space available, what is your next question?
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post #6 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 08:35 AM - Thread Starter
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I think you've answered your own question make the room the full size of the space available, what is your next question?
Haha. I guess I was wondering if the depth had acoustic consequences that I needed to be worried about. If not, I'll obviously just size the room to its ideal dimensions for room utility.

I guess my next question is necessarily screen size. Is a 135" Diagonal OK for that room? I taped out the dimensions with Blue tape and still have some decent wall space around it, but of course with the relatively narrow room am not sure if I could/should go bigger (or smaller for that matter). I'm also wondering if an AT screen changes that size consideration. I was looking at the 135 because it left room on the sides for towers.

And is there an appreciable difference between a regular Silver Ticket screen and their AT screens? Is DIY any better for the cost.

And then the last screen-for-room question would be to hear people's thoughts on going 2:35 versus 16:9. I was looking at a BenQ 2050, and I can't really find much info on anamorphic lenses (though I did find an interesting DIY post), so that doesn't seem like the easiest option. However, I wonder if simple zooming can take care of things without any image quality loss, assuming my dimensions operate within the projector's parameters.
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post #7 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 08:58 AM
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I am working with pretty much the same size room (slightly smaller). Call Mike Garret at AVS for screen options and PJ options. The screen size is also dictated by projector throw and light output. I went with a JVC RS500 and a 130" wide (not diagonal) Falcon AT scope screen that is is actually 137 inches wide based on Mike's suggestions.

On room size, if you use an AT screen and two rows, you are going to want every bit of that space, especially if you go double-stud walls for soundproofing.
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post #8 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:06 AM - Thread Starter
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I am working with pretty much the same size room (slightly smaller). Call Mike Garret at AVS for screen options and PJ options. The screen size is also dictated by projector throw and light output. I went with a JVC RS500 and a 130" wide (not diagonal) Falcon AT scope screen that is is actually 137 inches wide based on Mike's suggestions.

On room size, if you use an AT screen and two rows, you are going to want every bit of that space, especially if you go double-stud walls for soundproofing.
Thanks. Before I make the call, I would appreciate your 2 cents if it's even worth it based on cost. I'm really only looking to spend about $1200 or so on the screen and projector. Am I crazy to try to make this work with a Silver Ticket and BenQ 2050? Or are there better options out there for similar prices?
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post #9 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by ctzalla View Post
Thanks. Before I make the call, I would appreciate your 2 cents if it's even worth it based on cost. I'm really only looking to spend about $1200 or so on the screen and projector. Am I crazy to try to make this work with a Silver Ticket and BenQ 2050? Or are there better options out there for similar prices?
So, I am totally new to having a PJ and can't answer your question. My PJ is still in its box during my build and the screen has not arrived. I did lots of reading on what I was looking for in the PJ forums, and then called Mike. All I can say is he was super helpful and seems to really know what product is out there, what it costs, and whether you can accomplish your goals within a certain budget, and what screen needs to be mated with what PJ product. So, I would say it is worth the call, even if you decide not to purchase from him. I would also post your questions in specific threads in the PJ and Screen subforums.
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post #10 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:16 AM
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ctzalla,


Here's my input on your situation after reading many hundreds of hours on this forum (wouldn't hurt to read a few hundred more, serious) and I'm in process of building my theater at the moment:


- Have a room plan drawn up before you start anything (if you don't do this you'll be redoing a many steps and spending a lot of extra money)
- Visit someones home movie theater if you can, it'll automatically answer and resolve your preferences and get you on the right path much quicker.
- 2 rows of seats (ceiling height of 8' will be limiting factor) and riser heights usually need to be higher than most people think
- Figure out close you like to sit to screen, this is important
- Go bigger than 135" screen mentioned, you'll hear a million arguments both ways if you should go 16:9 or 2.35:1. Only you can decide.
- Go with absolute biggest AT screen and if its too big build false panel with black material wrap to cover unused portion of screen. Many regret small screen, no one regrets too big a screen.
- Build two rooms in your space, make one room five or six feet deep by your 14.5' width for equipment and baffle wall for speakers to rest in behind AT screen
- Ignore most efforts to soundproof your room, UNLESS you have at least $10K to dedicate to sound proofing and many people spend ~$35K on soundproofing. Half-@ass attempts to soundproof are for the most part a waste.
- Spend time to pick out exact audio equipment and dimensions before you build anything (back to number one above) especially subwoofer size/placement
- In the ceiling run at least a 2" inner diameter pipe from the equipment room to the projector location in the ceiling for routing cables
- Make sure you have decent HVAC, at least 2 return ducts of adequate size
- I wired my room for 11.4.6 even though it'll never happen, its easy to run wires prior to drywall.
- Consider additional support in ceiling where needed, projector mounting, stripper poles, etc.
- Read through a few theater build forums or at least one from beginning to end, more than likely it'll be eye opening.
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post #11 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by ctzalla View Post
Am I crazy to try to make this work with a Silver Ticket and BenQ 2050? Or are there better options out there for similar prices?
I don't think so. I have a fairly cheap/simple setup that we have used for years and I think your mother would love that combination.

I would suggest getting the largest screen possible. Your only decision then is 16:9 or scope 2.35:1 keeping in mind the projector is native 16:9 and that is the simplest way to use it. A 150 inch 16:9 screen still gives you about a 143 inch 2.35:1 movie experience and makes it simple for your mother to use.

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/15-gen...eap-build.html
Epson HC2000; Screen - 151.5" 16:9 - 143.5" 2.35:1; Yamaha RXV675 for 7.3; Speakers - Infinity Primus; Subs - 2 Polk PSW10s, 1 BIC F12; Headphones - 4 JVC wireless; Sony 3D Blu-ray player/six pairs 3D glasses.
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post #12 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctzalla View Post
Specifically, I would like the largest screen possible, and am looking right now at 135" Diagonal Silver Ticket, which would go on the short wall. I also want to be able to sit relatively close to the screen (probably inside the recommended 15-16 ft), as I want to replicate the true theater experience of being fully "inside" of the screen, or at least have that option.
FYI, I think there is some debate on recommended viewing distances. I am going to place viewing distance at around 11 for the front row, and I have seen many on here go even closer on a similar size screen with reportedly good results.
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post #13 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:31 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MinnesotaGreg View Post
ctzalla,


Here's my input on your situation after reading many hundreds of hours on this forum (wouldn't hurt to read a few hundred more, serious) and I'm in process of building my theater at the moment:


- Have a room plan drawn up before you start anything (if you don't do this you'll be redoing a many steps and spending a lot of extra money)
- Visit someones home movie theater if you can, it'll automatically answer and resolve your preferences and get you on the right path much quicker.
- 2 rows of seats (ceiling height of 8' will be limiting factor) and riser heights usually need to be higher than most people think
- Figure out close you like to sit to screen, this is important
- Go bigger than 135" screen mentioned, you'll hear a million arguments both ways if you should go 16:9 or 2.35:1. Only you can decide.
- Go with absolute biggest AT screen and if its too big build false panel with black material wrap to cover unused portion of screen. Many regret small screen, no one regrets too big a screen.
- Build two rooms in your space, make one room five or six feet deep by your 14.5' width for equipment and baffle wall for speakers to rest in behind AT screen
- Ignore most efforts to soundproof your room, UNLESS you have at least $10K to dedicate to sound proofing and many people spend ~$35K on soundproofing. Half-@ass attempts to soundproof are for the most part a waste.
- Spend time to pick out exact audio equipment and dimensions before you build anything (back to number one above) especially subwoofer size/placement
- In the ceiling run at least a 2" inner diameter pipe from the equipment room to the projector location in the ceiling for routing cables
- Make sure you have decent HVAC, at least 2 return ducts of adequate size
- I wired my room for 11.4.6 even though it'll never happen, its easy to run wires prior to drywall.
- Consider additional support in ceiling where needed, projector mounting, stripper poles, etc.
- Read through a few theater build forums or at least one from beginning to end, more than likely it'll be eye opening.
I've done tons of reading but you've clearly done a lot more!

I'm particularly interested in the sound proofing point. I find it surprising. I would have thought that some simple DIY reflection panels and bass traps in corners, ceiling, etc. would have made a huge difference for not much money based on what I've read. I'm dealing with 4 painted cinder block walls and one poured cement floor.

I'm not concerned with aesthetics at this point. If mom loves the theater in the dark she'll probably ask me to complete the room to finish level later - which I have to do given my time constraints.

And though this is all for my mother, I'm also thinking in the back of my mind that I will cannibalize the system for myself if she doesn't like it.
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post #14 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:32 AM - Thread Starter
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I don't think so. I have a fairly cheap/simple setup that we have used for years and I think your mother would love that combination.

I would suggest getting the largest screen possible. Your only decision then is 16:9 or scope 2.35:1 keeping in mind the projector is native 16:9 and that is the simplest way to use it. A 150 inch 16:9 screen still gives you about a 143 inch 2.35:1 movie experience and makes it simple for your mother to use.
Actually, you just made a very important point that I forgot to mention, which is ease of use for my mom. Thanks.
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post #15 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:35 AM
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Originally Posted by ctzalla View Post
I'm particularly interested in the sound proofing point. I find it surprising. I would have thought that some simple DIY reflection panels and bass traps in corners, ceiling, etc. would have made a huge difference for not much money based on what I've read.
Nope.

Soundproofing master thread
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post #16 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:38 AM - Thread Starter
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Hmmm. Maybe I missed the big picture then. I've been doing so much reading around here, including there, that I can't believe I came to a different conclusion.

So it sounds like, just to clarify, aside from comfort issues, I really don't need to bother with any sound proofing or accoustic treatments in my cement box? That certainly saves me some time and money, and most importantly, gets me operational a lot sooner!

EDIT: in the interest of total clarity, let me restate. I'm talking about accoustic treatments, not sound proofing. There is no need to sound proof here.
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post #17 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 09:43 AM
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Acoustic treatments and soundproofing are different concepts, IMO. Acoustic treatments help in-room response, soundproofing keeps the room quiet and isolated from outside noise and helps prevent inside sound from escaping. I am not suggesting acoustic treatments should be skipped, just that they do not "soundproof" a room.
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post #18 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 10:12 AM - Thread Starter
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Acoustic treatments and soundproofing are different concepts, IMO. Acoustic treatments help in-room response, soundproofing keeps the room quiet and isolated from outside noise and helps prevent inside sound from escaping. I am not suggesting acoustic treatments should be skipped, just that they do not "soundproof" a room.
OK. Glad I clarified then.
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post #19 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 10:27 AM
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Reflection panels and bass traps have benefits after the room is built. I was referring to the construction phase of the theater room itself. For example, some build two walls around the entire room rather than just one. Then two layers of drywall separated by a non drying caulk tube type of material "green glue" between each layer and the drywall isn't directly attached to the studs, rather metal channels. It goes on and on, sound proof doors (start $4K), duct work treatment, etc., riser stage not touching perimeter walls, sealed electrical outlets, etc. The whole concept is based on building a room that doesn't touch or minimal contact with rest of the house but they'll use fancy words for it like "decoupling" and "resonate" others that take you a second to think about in acoustical mentality to realize what they are saying if it's not something you work with on a regular basis.
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post #20 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by ctzalla View Post
Hmmm. Maybe I missed the big picture then. I've been doing so much reading around here, including there, that I can't believe I came to a different conclusion.

So it sounds like, just to clarify, aside from comfort issues, I really don't need to bother with any sound proofing or accoustic treatments in my cement box? That certainly saves me some time and money, and most importantly, gets me operational a lot sooner!

EDIT: in the interest of total clarity, let me restate. I'm talking about accoustic treatments, not sound proofing. There is no need to sound proof here.
With the statement that "no need to sound proof here" you can do acoustical treatments DIY style for pennies on the dollar.

By far the biggest price (and feature) inflated theater products are "acoustical panels". Google away on the hundreds of approaches. In the end it boils down to material thickness (insulation), placement, and aesthetics. You CAN do this. Once you tackle one you will get better at it and your wallet will thank you.
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post #21 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 11:16 AM - Thread Starter
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With the statement that "no need to sound proof here" you can do acoustical treatments DIY style for pennies on the dollar.

By far the biggest price (and feature) inflated theater products are "acoustical panels". Google away on the hundreds of approaches. In the end it boils down to material thickness (insulation), placement, and aesthetics. You CAN do this. Once you tackle one you will get better at it and your wallet will thank you.
Yes, thank you. That is what I had planned on doing. I guess when I misspoke and said sound proofing vs acoustic treatments I confused everyone, especially myself.

Funny thing is, my brother is a custom furniture maker and we once constructed 12 pretty amazing acoustic panels for a restaurant/bar venture that went belly up, and I'm now kicking myself that we didn't take those suckers with us when we walked away.
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Originally Posted by MinnesotaGreg View Post
ctzalla,


Here's my input on your situation after reading many hundreds of hours on this forum (wouldn't hurt to read a few hundred more, serious) and I'm in process of building my theater at the moment:


- Have a room plan drawn up before you start anything (if you don't do this you'll be redoing a many steps and spending a lot of extra money)
- Visit someones home movie theater if you can, it'll automatically answer and resolve your preferences and get you on the right path much quicker.
- 2 rows of seats (ceiling height of 8' will be limiting factor) and riser heights usually need to be higher than most people think
- Figure out close you like to sit to screen, this is important
- Go bigger than 135" screen mentioned, you'll hear a million arguments both ways if you should go 16:9 or 2.35:1. Only you can decide.
- Go with absolute biggest AT screen and if its too big build false panel with black material wrap to cover unused portion of screen. Many regret small screen, no one regrets too big a screen.
- Build two rooms in your space, make one room five or six feet deep by your 14.5' width for equipment and baffle wall for speakers to rest in behind AT screen
- Ignore most efforts to soundproof your room, UNLESS you have at least $10K to dedicate to sound proofing and many people spend ~$35K on soundproofing. Half-@ass attempts to soundproof are for the most part a waste.
- Spend time to pick out exact audio equipment and dimensions before you build anything (back to number one above) especially subwoofer size/placement
- In the ceiling run at least a 2" inner diameter pipe from the equipment room to the projector location in the ceiling for routing cables
- Make sure you have decent HVAC, at least 2 return ducts of adequate size
- I wired my room for 11.4.6 even though it'll never happen, its easy to run wires prior to drywall.
- Consider additional support in ceiling where needed, projector mounting, stripper poles, etc.
- Read through a few theater build forums or at least one from beginning to end, more than likely it'll be eye opening.
A couple of comments in response to this:

Two rooms: I'd recommend "three" rooms (the third being the area behind the false wall). Room 1 being the main seating area and room 2 being a dedicated projector room. I hate seeing the projector in theaters, plus the noise and heat and the construction considerations for mounting and running wires. A projection room solves all of this (assuming you have the space to do so, but I'd rather have a smaller seating area if it means I can build a projection room).

Sound proofing: If you are spending 35g on sound proofing I'd like to know how big your theater is. Clips, channel, gg, double drywall, serenity mat, a proper sound proof door do all add up. However, clips/channel/dd/gg are not that pricey unless the room is massive. Drywall hanging guys are not the pricey. Drywall itself is dirt cheap. Curious how that # came to be. I've done extreme sound proofing measures and MAYBE hit the 10g mark. Beyond that it would be extreme diminishing returns.

HVAC: Before you even begin demo work, call out 2-3 HVAC shops. Explain your goals. Discuss airflow velocity vs sound. Discuss proper sizing (how many people will be in the room at max capacity? Will you do anything besides watch movies in there (i.e. workout, etc)? Do you want to isolate the ducts from the rest of the house?

Soffits are your friend when it comes to wiring after the fact. I'm a huge believer in wire what you can before drywall goes up, however with a proper perimeter soffit design you can get away with a lot after the fact (and there will ALWAYS be "after the fact" unless you are a master planner. S--T happens. Especially during theater builds. Add some "Ooops" factor protection into your design. You'll thank me 6 months later when you find a need to add one more speaker cable run.

Projector mounts/etc: Once again....projection room. So many advantages.
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post #23 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 11:24 AM
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Yes, thank you. That is what I had planned on doing. I guess when I misspoke and said sound proofing vs acoustic treatments I confused everyone, especially myself.

Funny thing is, my brother is a custom furniture maker and we once constructed 12 pretty amazing acoustic panels for a restaurant/bar venture that went belly up, and I'm now kicking myself that we didn't take those suckers with us when we walked away.
Get the following:

1X2 pine furring strips
Pocket hole jig and pocket screws
Chop saw
GOM fabric
2" - 4" fiberglass board (cosmetics dictate thickness I find)
Air stapler
Good shop vac to collect dust from the chop saw
Cushion for your butt while you sit on the theater floor for hours.
Pandora station set to Metallica and coffee delivered by spouse.

I can knock out most rooms in 10 hours or so. It's a grueling day, but it comes out exact fit AND well within budget.
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post #24 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 11:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by freudie1 View Post
A couple of comments in response to this:

Two rooms: I'd recommend "three" rooms (the third being the area behind the false wall). Room 1 being the main seating area and room 2 being a dedicated projector room. I hate seeing the projector in theaters, plus the noise and heat and the construction considerations for mounting and running wires. A projection room solves all of this (assuming you have the space to do so, but I'd rather have a smaller seating area if it means I can build a projection room).

Sound proofing: If you are spending 35g on sound proofing I'd like to know how big your theater is. Clips, channel, gg, double drywall, serenity mat, a proper sound proof door do all add up. However, clips/channel/dd/gg are not that pricey unless the room is massive. Drywall hanging guys are not the pricey. Drywall itself is dirt cheap. Curious how that # came to be. I've done extreme sound proofing measures and MAYBE hit the 10g mark. Beyond that it would be extreme diminishing returns.

HVAC: Before you even begin demo work, call out 2-3 HVAC shops. Explain your goals. Discuss airflow velocity vs sound. Discuss proper sizing (how many people will be in the room at max capacity? Will you do anything besides watch movies in there (i.e. workout, etc)? Do you want to isolate the ducts from the rest of the house?

Soffits are your friend when it comes to wiring after the fact. I'm a huge believer in wire what you can before drywall goes up, however with a proper perimeter soffit design you can get away with a lot after the fact (and there will ALWAYS be "after the fact" unless you are a master planner. S--T happens. Especially during theater builds. Add some "Ooops" factor protection into your design. You'll thank me 6 months later when you find a need to add one more speaker cable run.

Projector mounts/etc: Once again....projection room. So many advantages.
This is all very interesting, especially the project room. I'd simply have to wonder ask if the projector I'm looking at, the BenQ 2050, could handle that throw ok. I guess if I assume 4 feet or so for the screen wall (?), and lets say the same for the projector room, that leaves me with a 19x15 theater room, which should easily fall within the limits of what the projector can do without loss. The question now becomes whether or not that is enough room, lol.

Oh, and your HVAC comment made me realize one glaring emission from my room description. There is one HVAC duct line running the width of that room that basically bisects it.
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post #25 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 11:49 AM
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This is all very interesting, especially the project room. I'd simply have to wonder ask if the projector I'm looking at, the BenQ 2050, could handle that throw ok. I guess if I assume 4 feet or so for the screen wall (?), and lets say the same for the projector room, that leaves me with a 19x15 theater room, which should easily fall within the limits of what the projector can do without loss. The question now becomes whether or not that is enough room, lol.

Oh, and your HVAC comment made me realize one glaring emission from my room description. There is one HVAC duct line running the width of that room that basically bisects it.
Check the manufacturers website and/or google for calculators that account for your exact projector. Tons of resources to determine throw distance.

As for HVAC, get ready to move and relocate IF you want an ideal ceiling. My personal theater required movement of the furnace and the main return duct work to the hall outside the room. Was very expensive, however I did not want a weird soffit mid way through the room (or bisecting as you stated correctly).

In my opinion the two areas that don't get paid enough attention in theater designs are: HVAC and the door to the room. Both are critical (the door more so for sound proofing efforts). HVAC is step #1 before you even demo. You need a game plan here or it gets real expensive real quick (think re-do effort). CALL some shops to come out and shoot the bull with you about this. Many are not "theater aware", however if you have a list of requirements you can usually find a shop or two that get creative (read: do what you want AND provide critical guidance) without the typical DIY mistakes.

My criteria for HVAC at a high level:

Little to no airflow noise (proper duct work sizing is key)

No shared ductwork with the rest of the house (dedicated ducted mini split....look it up).

Properly sized for not only the # of people (max) in the room but also properly sized returns (do NOT skip returns...you will be re-doing the hvac after day one if you do).

Wiring accounted for BEFORE drywall. This is especially important for mini split installs (i.e. 220 line required). It's easy (and cheap) to run 220 lines before drywall. It's infinitely harder (impossible without destruction?) after drywall.

Crawlspaces are awesome (basement theaters apply) for hiding ductwork and sound reduction. I've been told some fairly ridiculous advice about how to sound proof when dealing with a crawlspace. 2 layers of 3/4" T&G with 9mm rubber matting below that (and green glue between it) speak otherwise. I need to post some pictures of my personal theater. You can't hear squat and I did it "wrong" per alot of the HVAC "experts". Theory vs reality trump all here. I can talk for days on this topic.
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post #26 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by freudie1 View Post
Check the manufacturers website and/or google for calculators that account for your exact projector. Tons of resources to determine throw distance.

As for HVAC, get ready to move and relocate IF you want an ideal ceiling. My personal theater required movement of the furnace and the main return duct work to the hall outside the room. Was very expensive, however I did not want a weird soffit mid way through the room (or bisecting as you stated correctly).

In my opinion the two areas that don't get paid enough attention in theater designs are: HVAC and the door to the room. Both are critical (the door more so for sound proofing efforts). HVAC is step #1 before you even demo. You need a game plan here or it gets real expensive real quick (think re-do effort). CALL some shops to come out and shoot the bull with you about this. Many are not "theater aware", however if you have a list of requirements you can usually find a shop or two that get creative (read: do what you want AND provide critical guidance) without the typical DIY mistakes.

My criteria for HVAC at a high level:

Little to no airflow noise (proper duct work sizing is key)

No shared ductwork with the rest of the house (dedicated ducted mini split....look it up).

Properly sized for not only the # of people (max) in the room but also properly sized returns (do NOT skip returns...you will be re-doing the hvac after day one if you do).

Wiring accounted for BEFORE drywall. This is especially important for mini split installs (i.e. 220 line required). It's easy (and cheap) to run 220 lines before drywall. It's infinitely harder (impossible without destruction?) after drywall.

Crawlspaces are awesome (basement theaters apply) for hiding ductwork and sound reduction. I've been told some fairly ridiculous advice about how to sound proof when dealing with a crawlspace. 2 layers of 3/4" T&G with 9mm rubber matting below that (and green glue between it) speak otherwise. I need to post some pictures of my personal theater. You can't hear squat and I did it "wrong" per alot of the HVAC "experts". Theory vs reality trump all here. I can talk for days on this topic.

If you need an "outlet" for HVAC talk (and even if you don't) please visit my thread and provide any comments you feel are appropriate. I am all ears and looking at HVAC options right now. Its pretty much the one area that is giving me knots in my stomach.

Preliminary Build Questions
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post #27 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 01:08 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by freudie1 View Post
Check the manufacturers website and/or google for calculators that account for your exact projector. Tons of resources to determine throw distance.

As for HVAC, get ready to move and relocate IF you want an ideal ceiling. My personal theater required movement of the furnace and the main return duct work to the hall outside the room. Was very expensive, however I did not want a weird soffit mid way through the room (or bisecting as you stated correctly).

In my opinion the two areas that don't get paid enough attention in theater designs are: HVAC and the door to the room. Both are critical (the door more so for sound proofing efforts). HVAC is step #1 before you even demo. You need a game plan here or it gets real expensive real quick (think re-do effort). CALL some shops to come out and shoot the bull with you about this. Many are not "theater aware", however if you have a list of requirements you can usually find a shop or two that get creative (read: do what you want AND provide critical guidance) without the typical DIY mistakes.

My criteria for HVAC at a high level:

Little to no airflow noise (proper duct work sizing is key)

No shared ductwork with the rest of the house (dedicated ducted mini split....look it up).

Properly sized for not only the # of people (max) in the room but also properly sized returns (do NOT skip returns...you will be re-doing the hvac after day one if you do).

Wiring accounted for BEFORE drywall. This is especially important for mini split installs (i.e. 220 line required). It's easy (and cheap) to run 220 lines before drywall. It's infinitely harder (impossible without destruction?) after drywall.

Crawlspaces are awesome (basement theaters apply) for hiding ductwork and sound reduction. I've been told some fairly ridiculous advice about how to sound proof when dealing with a crawlspace. 2 layers of 3/4" T&G with 9mm rubber matting below that (and green glue between it) speak otherwise. I need to post some pictures of my personal theater. You can't hear squat and I did it "wrong" per alot of the HVAC "experts". Theory vs reality trump all here. I can talk for days on this topic.
I'm not sure I'll be able to re-route the HVAC, but I can certainly add some new ductwork/returns in. Because of my ceiling height limitations, there's literally nothing else I can do if I still want AC in the living room! Again, sound proofing isn't an issue for me at all so my main issues will be acoustics -- and of course, whether or not the projector will be able to shoot under the duct and over the heads of the rear row spectators!

Speaking of that projector, and your room idea, do you seal the room entirely and shoot through glass, or do you leave a window opening to shoot your image through?
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post #28 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 01:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jjackkrash View Post
I am working with pretty much the same size room (slightly smaller). Call Mike Garret at AVS for screen options and PJ options. The screen size is also dictated by projector throw and light output. I went with a JVC RS500 and a 130" wide (not diagonal) Falcon AT scope screen that is is actually 137 inches wide based on Mike's suggestions.

On room size, if you use an AT screen and two rows, you are going to want every bit of that space, especially if you go double-stud walls for soundproofing.
One question about your Falcon screen JJ: did you get the material only and DIY or go the whole route with Falcon's frame, etc. I've done some prelim poking around and that Vision HD at $20/ft would only come out to about $225 for 135 wide if I'm reading things correctly. The Silver Ticket AT screen at that width (150 diagonal for 16:9) is $599 (frame included), and best I can find is $399 refurbished. I haven't looked into DIY framing yet but I don't mind building and saving right now is a key consideration.

The Horizon stuff is out of my current budget and both are too expensive if I get the frame from Falcon anyway...
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post #29 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 02:30 PM
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One question about your Falcon screen JJ: did you get the material only and DIY or go the whole route with Falcon's frame, etc. I've done some prelim poking around and that Vision HD at $20/ft would only come out to about $225 for 135 wide if I'm reading things correctly. The Silver Ticket AT screen at that width (150 diagonal for 16:9) is $599 (frame included), and best I can find is $399 refurbished. I haven't looked into DIY framing yet but I don't mind building and saving right now is a key consideration.

The Horizon stuff is out of my current budget and both are too expensive if I get the frame from Falcon anyway...
I splurged a bit and ordered the Horizon screen and assembly. My understanding is that AVScience has some pretty high quality DIY AT screen material for a reasonable price, but I don't recall what its called. Mike Garret would know.
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post #30 of 33 Old 07-20-2016, 02:48 PM
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Falcon and SeymourAV both sell just the fabric. Falcon offers a AVS friends and family discount on the screen packages, just ask Rich for my discount.
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