Acoustical Treatments Master Thread - Page 144 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 55Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #4291 of 10610 Old 01-29-2009, 05:39 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Dennis Erskine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Near an airport
Posts: 9,143
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 50
As an FYI, there is a new product (a couple actually) from Quest Acoustical Interiors (www.questai.com), ... no I don't work for them.

Perf-Sorber is a combination absorber/diffuser in a single fiberglass panel. An excellent early reflection point product speakers with good off axis response. Also, a good choice around surround speakers. The other (I forget their trade name) is a product with very good absorption down to 150Hz.

Dennis Erskine CFI, CFII, MEI
Architectural Acoustics
Subject Matter Expert
Certified Home Theater Designer
CEDIA Board of Directors
www.erskine-group.com
www.CinemaForte.net
Dennis Erskine is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4292 of 10610 Old 01-29-2009, 10:50 AM
Wireless member
 
pepar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: On the beach in Quintana Roo
Posts: 25,244
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 245 Post(s)
Liked: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine View Post

As an FYI, there is a new product (a couple actually) from Quest Acoustical Interiors (www.questai.com), ... no I don't work for them.

Perf-Sorber is a combination absorber/diffuser in a single fiberglass panel. An excellent early reflection point product speakers with good off axis response. Also, a good choice around surround speakers. The other (I forget their trade name) is a product with very good absorption down to 150Hz.

Thanks, but I could not find the Perf-Sorber.
pepar is offline  
post #4293 of 10610 Old 01-29-2009, 10:55 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: New Milford, CT, USA
Posts: 5,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by will1383 View Post

I'm going to be hard pressed to fit anything in the front of the room

Wall-floor and wall-ceiling corners are just as good as wall-wall corners.

Quote:
my speaker stands which double as bass traps (can fill them with sand).

A tube filled with sand is not a bass trap.

Quote:
would you suggest moving the subwoofer to the rear of the room where I'll have a couple of bass traps in the corners

Sub location and bass trap location are not really related. If you can post a photo of your room I may be able to suggest something.

Quote:
would you also recommend against a second subwoofer?

I do fine with one killer SVS sub and a huge amount of bass trapping, but some people are happy with two subs.

--Ethan

RealTraps - The acoustic treatment experts
Ethan's Audio Expert book

Ethan Winer is offline  
post #4294 of 10610 Old 01-29-2009, 11:39 AM
Advanced Member
 
will1383's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Saratoga, NY
Posts: 544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer View Post

Wall-floor and wall-ceiling corners are just as good as wall-wall corners.



A tube filled with sand is not a bass trap.



Sub location and bass trap location are not really related. If you can post a photo of your room I may be able to suggest something.



I do fine with one killer SVS sub and a huge amount of bass trapping, but some people are happy with two subs.

--Ethan

I have family down your way, and I think we are going to visit sometime in April. I should try and see if I can make an appointment to come and visit you.

Here's a basic layout of my room:




But, it is Tight around the screen and such. There's very little room in the front for bass traps.

Funny, I thought that a sand filled tube would suffice as partly a bass trap, but, I figured that something wasn't quite right about that. The two rear corners, again are going to be pretty tight, but I have more room to work with in those than in the front...

I might put 4" of 703 on the front wall instead of 2 just to help with the lower frequency absorbtion... Thoughts regarding that?

Or should I really take the time to take all the measurements of the room before doing anything?

Also, where those sconces are there are going to be 4 Cherry columns. They are wood, would mass loading the inside of them help absorb some of the low frequencies? They are not at the 1st and 2nd reflection points.
will1383 is offline  
post #4295 of 10610 Old 01-29-2009, 05:17 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Dennis Erskine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Near an airport
Posts: 9,143
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 50
Quote:


Thanks, but I could not find the Perf-Sorber

Call them. It may not be up on the website yet. Works very nicely.

Dennis Erskine CFI, CFII, MEI
Architectural Acoustics
Subject Matter Expert
Certified Home Theater Designer
CEDIA Board of Directors
www.erskine-group.com
www.CinemaForte.net
Dennis Erskine is offline  
post #4296 of 10610 Old 01-29-2009, 07:22 PM
AVS Special Member
 
sound dropouts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Charlotte
Posts: 1,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I am hoping to make a theater in the upstairs room of a house. The roof slants into the room, creating an odd shape. I am unsure how to acoustically treat the room. Attached is a rough drawing of what I hope the front will look like...where should I put acoustic treatemnts? Should I put them on the slanted parts as well?

sound dropouts is offline  
post #4297 of 10610 Old 01-30-2009, 02:35 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: New Milford, CT, USA
Posts: 5,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by will1383 View Post

I thought that a sand filled tube would suffice as partly a bass trap, but, I figured that something wasn't quite right about that.

There's an article on the DIY TV Network site that shows how to make a "bass trap" from sand in a cardboard tube. That article is the laughing stock of the acoustics industry. I even wrote to them and explained (nicely), but they never replied and the article was still there the last time I checked.

Quote:


I might put 4" of 703 on the front wall instead of 2 just to help with the lower frequency absorbtion.

Sure, that can only help. Especially if it's near wall-wall, wall-floor, and/or wall-ceiling corners.

Quote:


They are wood, would mass loading the inside of them help absorb some of the low frequencies?

Not likely.

--Ethan

RealTraps - The acoustic treatment experts
Ethan's Audio Expert book

Ethan Winer is offline  
post #4298 of 10610 Old 01-30-2009, 08:48 PM
Member
 
(Berk)'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I previously explained my concrete bunker under the garage that I am currently working on. There is only one wall that is shared with the rest of the home, the other 3 walls are fully below ground level the only thing on the otherside of them is dirt.

If I'm not worried about sound isolation, only a good sounding room, wouldn't it also work to just not drywall the bottom 48" of all the walls? Could I shove regular insulation in there, then some linacoustic (if it is needed?) and then fabric? Then I only have to drywall the top portion.

The one shared wall on the other side of the 8 inch concrete wall is 2X6 framed, and drywalled too.

Also, can anyone tell me if eggcarton shaped foam is a good idea to put on my sloped concrete ceiling?

Thanks,
Berk
(Berk) is offline  
post #4299 of 10610 Old 01-31-2009, 10:39 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: New Milford, CT, USA
Posts: 5,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Berk) View Post

If I'm not worried about sound isolation, only a good sounding room, wouldn't it also work to just not drywall the bottom 48" of all the walls?

Drywall, cement, it's all the same - reflective. If you want the room to sound good what you really need are corner bass traps, plus absorbers at the side-wall and ceiling reflection points.

Quote:


can anyone tell me if eggcarton shaped foam is a good idea to put on my sloped concrete ceiling?

It depends on the quality and thickness of the foam. Generally speaking, better treatments are made from rigid fiberglass.

--Ethan

RealTraps - The acoustic treatment experts
Ethan's Audio Expert book

Ethan Winer is offline  
post #4300 of 10610 Old 01-31-2009, 11:06 AM
Member
 
(Berk)'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer View Post

Drywall, cement, it's all the same - reflective. If you want the room to sound good what you really need are corner bass traps, plus absorbers at the side-wall and ceiling reflection points.



It depends on the quality and thickness of the foam. Generally speaking, better treatments are made from rigid fiberglass.

--Ethan


So if drywall and cement are both reflective, there is no benefit to drywall the areas that will be covered up with treatments anyways?

Okay thanks, that will save me some time and money.
(Berk) is offline  
post #4301 of 10610 Old 01-31-2009, 11:19 AM
Advanced Member
 
eugovector's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Pleasant Valley, ny
Posts: 961
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Berk) View Post

So if drywall and cement are both reflective, there is no benefit to drywall the areas that will be covered up with treatments anyways?

Okay thanks, that will save me some time and money.

Keep in mind that you want the room to be insulated for heat/ac as well as sound. Don't want to be sweating/freezing while you're watching movies.

Listen to the Real HT Info Podcast at http://realht.info, including video reviews at my YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/realhtinfo/videos
eugovector is offline  
post #4302 of 10610 Old 01-31-2009, 11:24 AM
Advanced Member
 
ScruffyHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: DeWinton, Alberta
Posts: 500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Berk) View Post

If I'm not worried about sound isolation, only a good sounding room, wouldn't it also work to just not drywall the bottom 48" of all the walls? Could I shove regular insulation in there, then some linacoustic (if it is needed?) and then fabric? Then I only have to drywall the top portion.

The one shared wall on the other side of the 8 inch concrete wall is 2X6 framed, and drywalled too.
Thanks,
Berk

Are you going to have the room inspected by the city ? ( electrical etc ? )
ScruffyHT is offline  
post #4303 of 10610 Old 01-31-2009, 12:05 PM
Member
 
(Berk)'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScruffyHT View Post

Are you going to have the room inspected by the city ? ( electrical etc ? )

No, I'm not planning having inspections done.
(Berk) is offline  
post #4304 of 10610 Old 01-31-2009, 12:08 PM
Member
 
(Berk)'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by eugovector View Post

Keep in mind that you want the room to be insulated for heat/ac as well as sound. Don't want to be sweating/freezing while you're watching movies.

I'm definitely going to insulate still, but I'm thinking of saving the bother of putting drywall on top of the insulation, only to add more insulation for accoustics.
(Berk) is offline  
post #4305 of 10610 Old 02-01-2009, 10:41 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: New Milford, CT, USA
Posts: 5,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Berk) View Post

So if drywall and cement are both reflective, there is no benefit to drywall the areas that will be covered up with treatments anyways?

Yes, assuming you mean using Liquid Nails etc to glue drywall flat onto the cement. In that case it's bunch of work for no acoustic gain. But making a new stud wall inside the cement wall can help (a little) with acoustics, and that can add thermal insulation too as eugovector said.

--Ethan

RealTraps - The acoustic treatment experts
Ethan's Audio Expert book

Ethan Winer is offline  
post #4306 of 10610 Old 02-01-2009, 02:53 PM
Member
 
(Berk)'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer View Post

Yes, assuming you mean using Liquid Nails etc to glue drywall flat onto the cement. In that case it's bunch of work for no acoustic gain. But making a new stud wall inside the cement wall can help (a little) with acoustics, and that can add thermal insulation too as eugovector said.

--Ethan

No, I have a 4 concrete walls that I've framed a new stud walls inside which will be fully insulated.

I am asking if it is okay to drywall only the top half of the walls and put fabric wrapped linacoustic (without drywall) on the bottom 48"? My thought is, what is the point of putting drywall on the bottom 48" if I'm going to cover it with accoustical treatment anyway? I'm not concerned about sound isolation.
(Berk) is offline  
post #4307 of 10610 Old 02-01-2009, 03:06 PM
Wireless member
 
pepar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: On the beach in Quintana Roo
Posts: 25,244
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 245 Post(s)
Liked: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Berk) View Post

No, I have a 4 concrete walls that I've framed a new stud walls inside which will be fully insulated.

I am asking if it is okay to drywall only the top half of the walls and put fabric wrapped linacoustic (without drywall) on the bottom 48"? My thought is, what is the point of putting drywall on the bottom 48" if I'm going to cover it with accoustical treatment anyway? I'm not concerned about sound isolation.

Resale value?
pepar is offline  
post #4308 of 10610 Old 02-02-2009, 10:53 AM
Advanced Member
 
will1383's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Saratoga, NY
Posts: 544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Berk) View Post

No, I have a 4 concrete walls that I've framed a new stud walls inside which will be fully insulated.

I am asking if it is okay to drywall only the top half of the walls and put fabric wrapped linacoustic (without drywall) on the bottom 48"? My thought is, what is the point of putting drywall on the bottom 48" if I'm going to cover it with accoustical treatment anyway? I'm not concerned about sound isolation.

I guess in theory you could, but you are only going to be saving maybe $100-150 on a several $1000's build. IMO, it's not worth saving in this case. Build a studded wall inside the concrete walls, and decouple that wall. Put Drywall on the whole thing, and then go from there. It'll be the best bang for the buck.

When I did this, I actually glued insulation onto my concrete walls, to help with both environmental and acoustics. Whether or not it made a difference acoustically, I have no idea.
will1383 is offline  
post #4309 of 10610 Old 02-02-2009, 02:59 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Ethan Winer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: New Milford, CT, USA
Posts: 5,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Berk) View Post

I am asking if it is okay to drywall only the top half of the walls and put fabric wrapped linacoustic (without drywall) on the bottom 48"? My thought is, what is the point of putting drywall on the bottom 48" if I'm going to cover it with accoustical treatment anyway? I'm not concerned about sound isolation.

In that case you'll do well to pack the entire space behind the drywall with fluffy fiberglass. Leaving off the bottom sheet rock will help a lot acoustically, because that gives substantial bass trapping along all the wall-floor corners. I agree with pepar about resale value, though maybe the next owner will want a good sounding room too?

--Ethan

RealTraps - The acoustic treatment experts
Ethan's Audio Expert book

Ethan Winer is offline  
post #4310 of 10610 Old 02-03-2009, 11:07 AM
Member
 
Erik Westlund's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Denver
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepar View Post

Those here with the knowledge and experience who could put something like that together are professional consultants, with "professionals" meaning "they work for money." That they answer questions at all for free is greatly appreciated. I am afraid that you will need to research this material on your own - like the rest of us have - or step up and hire a pro.

Thanks Pepar for your response. But I feel you have misinterpreted my message a little. It would not intend to weaken the consumer/client relations. I think it would enrich it.

I am in the A/V retail sales industry. And I have been for years. I see with both a consumer-client point of view (it's my hobby) AS WELL as the sales side of things. I always appreciate a more knowledgeable client when I meet one. It makes for a better level of communication. Even if they have the basics down... just a little. I can better understand their motives and interests. It also makes their efforts easier, as well. Since this is a technology based language. It seems obvious to me that one must understand the basics before they can communicate with a more experienced individual.

Often times, a client may not have the full or correct information from what they have learned. But that's OK if they have not executed that idea yet. After talking with a professional, they will be more aware and appreciative of their help and knowledge. They will realize that there is a whole lot more to know. When the client has taken the initiative to attain some knowledge on their own. They then realize it can't be done on their own if they want to do it right and/or done in a reasonable amount of time.

With the intent of this "outline- a/v bible", most of these basics can be covered. This should minimize a level of forum redundancy and advance beginners to intermediate in little time.

no?
Erik Westlund is offline  
post #4311 of 10610 Old 02-03-2009, 12:46 PM
Wireless member
 
pepar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: On the beach in Quintana Roo
Posts: 25,244
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 245 Post(s)
Liked: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erik Westlund View Post

Thanks Pepar for your response. But I feel you have misinterpreted my message a little. It would not intend to weaken the consumer/client relations. I think it would enrich it.

I am in the A/V retail sales industry. And I have been for years. I see with both a consumer-client point of view (it's my hobby) AS WELL as the sales side of things. I always appreciate a more knowledgeable client when I meet one. It makes for a better level of communication. Even if they have the basics down... just a little. I can better understand their motives and interests. It also makes their efforts easier, as well. Since this is a technology based language. It seems obvious to me that one must understand the basics before they can communicate with a more experienced individual.

Often times, a client may not have the full or correct information from what they have learned. But that's OK if they have not executed that idea yet. After talking with a professional, they will be more aware and appreciative of their help and knowledge. They will realize that there is a whole lot more to know. When the client has taken the initiative to attain some knowledge on their own. They then realize it can't be done on their own if they want to do it right and/or done in a reasonable amount of time.

With the intent of this "outline- a/v bible", most of these basics can be covered. This should minimize a level of forum redundancy and advance beginners to intermediate in little time.

no?

Nice thoughts, but it would still be a lot of work on a complex subject with many aspects that lack 100% consensus . . with no immediate . . and perhaps simply no . . return.

You're in marketing, aren't you?
pepar is offline  
post #4312 of 10610 Old 02-03-2009, 09:06 PM
Advanced Member
 
Triaxtremec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: OMAHA, NE
Posts: 721
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Where is a great place to get rigid fiberglass so I may make my own panels? Also are foam panels bad to use?
Triaxtremec is offline  
post #4313 of 10610 Old 02-03-2009, 09:22 PM
Advanced Member
 
elee532's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 561
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine View Post

Perf-Sorber is a combination absorber/diffuser in a single fiberglass panel. An excellent early reflection point product speakers with good off axis response. Also, a good choice around surround speakers. The other (I forget their trade name) is a product with very good absorption down to 150Hz.

So, I was thinking about trying these, or maybe just a plain old absorption panel, at my side reflection points. However, my room has a 6" ledge and then a window about 4' up the wall. The right side wall has no similar constraints. How would I position a panel on this wall?

Here are some photos (see particularly the last one of the bunch):
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showp...postcount=2825

Thanks!
elee532 is offline  
post #4314 of 10610 Old 02-04-2009, 08:50 PM
Member
 
Erik Westlund's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Denver
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepar View Post

Nice thoughts, but it would still be a lot of work on a complex subject with many aspects that lack 100% consensus . . with no immediate . . and perhaps simply no . . return.

You're in marketing, aren't you?

Perhaps you are right. There are a lot of good books out there to begin with, as well.

p.s. no. I'm not in marketing.
p.s. I've been reading the latest posts. I just would like to throw this out.
If anyone is thinking of putting up a lot of sound treatment on the walls. Be careful of what type of material you use to keep the maintenance low. Mainly mold. For instance. If you live in a humid place and you want to put up something like cotton in a basement wall, consider your options first. You also might want to keep this spider free, too.
ew
Erik Westlund is offline  
post #4315 of 10610 Old 02-04-2009, 09:04 PM
Member
 
bravo36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Corinth, Texas
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triaxtremec View Post

Where is a great place to get rigid fiberglass so I may make my own panels? Also are foam panels bad to use?

Here's where I got mine in Dallas: http://www.spi-co.com/index.html

And guess what...they have a location in Omaha: SPI (Specialty Products and Insulation Co.)

5010 I Street
Omaha, NE***68117
402-827-3880
402-827-3882 FAX
omaha@spi-co.com

Great, friendly folks to deal with at my location. I bought 1 1/2" 3# ridgid panels for about $90.00/case (16-2x4 sheets). Worked like a champ.
bravo36 is offline  
post #4316 of 10610 Old 02-04-2009, 09:20 PM
AVS Special Member
 
AnthemAVM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 1,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Anyone have a good place to buy Guilford of Maine fabric?

I have some GIK panels that need to be recovered in a new color.

thanks
AnthemAVM is offline  
post #4317 of 10610 Old 02-05-2009, 12:56 AM
Member
 
(Berk)'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer View Post

In that case you'll do well to pack the entire space behind the drywall with fluffy fiberglass. Leaving off the bottom sheet rock will help a lot acoustically, because that gives substantial bass trapping along all the wall-floor corners. I agree with pepar about resale value, though maybe the next owner will want a good sounding room too?

--Ethan

Thanks Ethan,

I'm more interested in the accoustic results than the resale value, but I'm not sure how anyone would notice that there isn't any sheetrock behind the bottom section if the fluffy fiberglass is covered with fabric wrapped rigid fibreglass panels. What do you think about using painted Tectum board for the bottom section instead of the rigid fibreglass? It would still be on top of the fluffy fibreglass.

Thanks for your input.
(Berk) is offline  
post #4318 of 10610 Old 02-05-2009, 07:33 AM
Wireless member
 
pepar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: On the beach in Quintana Roo
Posts: 25,244
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 245 Post(s)
Liked: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthemAVM View Post

Anyone have a good place to buy Guilford of Maine fabric?

I have some GIK panels that need to be recovered in a new color.

thanks

The best price I had found when I built my treatments is here. Every online seller that I found was very "proud" of this product (read: it ain't cheap), but it works and has safety aspects that stuff from the local fabric shop lacks.
pepar is offline  
post #4319 of 10610 Old 02-05-2009, 08:50 AM
AVS Special Member
 
nathan_h's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 5,180
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Liked: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthemAVM View Post

Anyone have a good place to buy Guilford of Maine fabric?

I have some GIK panels that need to be recovered in a new color.

thanks

GIK sells GOM fabric separately from the panels for about $15 per yard which seems to be the standard price.

____________________

Build Thread: "Nathan's Theater in Search of....".
nathan_h is online now  
post #4320 of 10610 Old 02-05-2009, 09:31 AM
Wireless member
 
pepar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: On the beach in Quintana Roo
Posts: 25,244
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 245 Post(s)
Liked: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathan_h View Post

GIK sells GOM fabric separately from the panels for about $15 per yard which seems to be the standard price.

I'm pretty sure that I paid substantially less at the place I linked, but that was some years ago. The poster should compare prices for himself.
pepar is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction

Tags
Fv15hp Subwoofer , Denon , Audyssey

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off