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post #1 of 41 Old 03-18-2017, 10:51 PM - Thread Starter
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Best placement for theater in open basement

I can't move much further in planning until I nail down my layout/design.

New construction house I moved into last year and still completely unfinished L-shaped basement.
Looking at 2 rows of 3-4 seats, still considering AT screen/false wall so that will take up some space as well. While keeping the rest of the basement functional and not wanting to kill the resale if the next person doesn't want a home theater.
Is it worth it to have this open space I have unmarked? I wanted to keep it flush against where the stairs stick out (22' long unfinished) but might end up needing to go out a little more. It seemed nice to have a little open space before the entrance.

Things to work around - future bathroom, furnace/hot water heater, stairs sticking out

Added my current layout idea and some pictures, excuse the mess.
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post #2 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 12:24 AM
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15'6" is a good width but can you make the length longer than 18'6" to make it easier to accommodate two rows?

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post #3 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 06:10 AM
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It is unclear; do you plan on leaving the theater open to the rest of the basement or walling it in?
I assume your measurements do not include the walls so you would need to subtract 10" or so from each dimension.
With the layout you have chosen, the entrance would need to be at the back of the theater. That takes up a lot of room (probably 5 feet of length to be comfortable) and means a step up to the second row riser from the entrance (very odd).
A typical theater with 2 rows of recliners and an AT screen would fit into your 22' length if it wasn't for the entrance requirements.
I assume you don't want to spin the orientation 90 degrees and take that entire end of your basement because of the egress window, electrical panel and all those crazy HVAC jumpers, correct? That orientation would simply work better for the entrance, but you might need to forget about recliners in the second row to save room.
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post #4 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 09:16 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post
15'6" is a good width but can you make the length longer than 18'6" to make it easier to accommodate two rows?
If I make it even with the stairs sticking out it would be 22'.

I'm thinking after framing and if there's a false wall would need at least 24' for two rows?




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post #5 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 09:25 AM - Thread Starter
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It is unclear; do you plan on leaving the theater open to the rest of the basement or walling it in?

I assume your measurements do not include the walls so you would need to subtract 10" or so from each dimension.

With the layout you have chosen, the entrance would need to be at the back of the theater. That takes up a lot of room (probably 5 feet of length to be comfortable) and means a step up to the second row riser from the entrance (very odd).

A typical theater with 2 rows of recliners and an AT screen would fit into your 22' length if it wasn't for the entrance requirements.

I assume you don't want to spin the orientation 90 degrees and take that entire end of your basement because of the egress window, electrical panel and all those crazy HVAC jumpers, correct? That orientation would simply work better for the entrance, but you might need to forget about recliners in the second row to save room.


Planning to wall it in and separate from the rest of the basement.

Yeah, no wall measurements yet, just some preliminary sectioning off to see what makes sense.

I was thinking about the entrance in the back...didn't really know how to work around that yet.

My original plan was to use the space flipped 90 degrees. It seemed like a great space and the more I measured out on paper it looked a little too small for two rows


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post #6 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 10:26 AM
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For me personally, a row of 5 recliners, with the outside ends angled in would work best, whether I had room for two rows or not. I very seldom have more than 3 or 4 guests in the theater at one time, and if I did, a counter with comfy bar chairs in behind could provide extra seating (say for a sports event). The complication of installing a riser and the thought of having friends and family sit in rows to watch something are real deterrents. (Typically visitors don't want to be cooped up in a dark room at the best of times.)
Regardless of which orientation you go with, two rows is going to be tight.
Decisions, decisions. Good luck.
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post #7 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 12:13 PM
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You could check out my build thread for ideas:

Vikings theater/game room

I wanted to keep the open concept, not really for resale value, just because I like it better. Also have a gym in my basement as well. First post shows the layout, further down the thread I post some current pictures. Ill be posting more pictures once its painted this week, should have a much better feel for it then.

I set it up so you can see screen from the game room and the gym.

Sorry, just reread posts, if you have already decided to build walls, disregard.

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post #8 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 12:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidK442 View Post
For me personally, a row of 5 recliners, with the outside ends angled in would work best, whether I had room for two rows or not. I very seldom have more than 3 or 4 guests in the theater at one time, and if I did, a counter with comfy bar chairs in behind could provide extra seating (say for a sports event). The complication of installing a riser and the thought of having friends and family sit in rows to watch something are real deterrents. (Typically visitors don't want to be cooped up in a dark room at the best of times.)
Regardless of which orientation you go with, two rows is going to be tight.
Decisions, decisions. Good luck.
+1, I had exact same thoughts when I designed mine. I think most people would rather hang out around a bar, especially for sports or a fight.
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post #9 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 01:11 PM
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I'm thinking after framing and if there's a false wall would need at least 24' for two rows?
Larger would be helpful, but you'll be fine with a 22' long room (better than the initial 18' proposal). The other option is to create sealed storage off to the side, as originally planned, but have an open back theatre. Use thick, light-blocking curtains as the "back wall" to get the room really dark. For casual viewing, pull the curtains so that they're tucked in the 4' corner behind the stairs. The space under the stairs would make for a nice equipment closet.

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post #10 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 01:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HTMatrix View Post
You could check out my build thread for ideas:

Vikings theater/game room

I wanted to keep the open concept, not really for resale value, just because I like it better. Also have a gym in my basement as well. First post shows the layout, further down the thread I post some current pictures. Ill be posting more pictures once its painted this week, should have a much better feel for it then.

I set it up so you can see screen from the game room and the gym.

Sorry, just reread posts, if you have already decided to build walls, disregard.
Your theater is coming along nicely. I think my train of thought was I at least wanted it to have a dividing wall to enclose sound from the gym area (I have a stereo zone for the gym). Your layout kind of makes me lean toward making two main rooms and get rid of the awkward "overflow area" which was just kind of hangout space. This would also solve the entrance being in the back David mentioned.
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post #11 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 01:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post
Larger would be helpful, but you'll be fine with a 22' long room (better than the initial 18' proposal). The other option is to create sealed storage off to the side, as originally planned, but have an open back theatre. Use thick, light-blocking curtains as the "back wall" to get the room really dark. For casual viewing, pull the curtains so that they're tucked in the 4' corner behind the stairs. The space under the stairs would make for a nice equipment closet.
What do you think of the revised layout I just posted? basically section off around the furnace and along the future bathroom and have the whole remaining length be room for theater.

Was thinking the exact same thing on some rack space under the stairs

There would be a door on the left of the theater to enter and I'd still have some room to play with between gym and theater.

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post #12 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 02:18 PM
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What do you think of the revised layout I just posted? basically section off around the furnace and along the future bathroom and have the whole remaining length be room for theater.

Was thinking the exact same thing on some rack space under the stairs

There would be a door on the left of the theater to enter and I'd still have some room to play with between gym and theater.
Will the stairs create an odd bump out?
A bit weird having to pass through the theater to get to the downstairs bathroom.
Seems like two rows is a necessity for you. If that is your priority than some minor "weirdness" in your basement will be an acceptable compromise.
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post #13 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 04:14 PM
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What do you think of the revised layout I just posted?
What David said: stairs will intrude into the theatre and a bit weird to have to walk through a home theatre just to go to the bathroom. If you want to do a sealed room, then draw a line at the stairs.

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post #14 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 05:21 PM - Thread Starter
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What David said: stairs will intrude into the theatre and a bit weird to have to walk through a home theatre just to go to the bathroom. If you want to do a sealed room, then draw a line at the stairs.
Thanks for the input. Definitely leaning this route. For what it would be used for, me and my girlfriend watching movies usually. I think the full length is a little overkill and the bathroom being too weirdly placed

Now...to learn how to frame this out
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post #15 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 07:15 PM
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You still have the stairs intruding into the room, preventing it from being a rectangle. The change in room length will mess with the acoustics. Better to go with the original 18'6" length, especially if it's going to be you & your girlfriend most of the time.

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post #16 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 07:32 PM - Thread Starter
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You still have the stairs intruding into the room, preventing it from being a rectangle. The change in room length will mess with the acoustics. Better to go with the original 18'6" length, especially if it's going to be you & your girlfriend most of the time.

Right, those annoying stairs. What do you think about flipping it 90 degrees and doing it on across the back wall. Just have to blackout the window and work around the electrical box, but would add 2 feet of length.



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post #17 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 07:58 PM
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What do you think about flipping it 90 degrees and doing it on across the back wall. Just have to blackout the window and work around the electrical box, but would add 2 feet of length.
That would work. Better to have room irregularities behind the listeners, where our human hearing isn't as good, so the electrical box and window should be at the back end of the room. Good idea to black out the window, though make sure it remains accessible for emergency egress.

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post #18 of 41 Old 03-19-2017, 08:19 PM
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Designing the layout of your basement is a critical task that will depend on your needs, while keeping resale value in mind.
We can make suggestions but I STRONGLY encourage you to download some software and model different layouts yourself.
I use a simple free program called Sweet Home 3D that is relatively easy to learn and will allow you to build and visualize your space in 3D.
A more advanced approach would be to use Google Sketchup. I played around with it a bit, but didn't have the patience.

A good place to start would be to determine an appropriate layout for the basement bathroom. Those three drain pipes sticking out of the ground aren't going anywhere so you need to get this right before planning your theater. With your current setup, it doesn't look like the door is in the correct location or the room width is sufficient.
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post #19 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 08:59 PM
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Right, those annoying stairs. What do you think about flipping it 90 degrees and doing it on across the back wall. Just have to blackout the window and work around the electrical box, but would add 2 feet of length.

In my opinion, the layout below is is probably the best use of the space you have. it gives you a nice sized 18' x 18' room after creating the false wall to cover your main speakers/subs. The false wall is large enough to hold a cinematic 2:35 aspect ratio 156" diagonal acoustically transparent widescreen. With 2' space behind the screen you have more than enough room for a triple JTR 215 setup with dual Cap 2400's on the sides. There is ample room around the seating for people to walk, with the prime listening seats situated in the acoustic center of the room. This also gives you a great location to display your media collection of DVD/BluRay's to the right of the theater entrance and near the equipment rack for swapping DVD's between movies. There is additional media storage space in the rear of the theater for additional DVD's or CD media that won't fit in the front library.



The best place for your equipment rack is under the stairs. Normally this would be an awkward space to utilize efficiently. However, placing the equipment there, solves numerous design needs. You can enclose the area under the stairs to create an equipment closet with a nice smoked glass door in front of the rack to display your equipment as guests enter the theater. Placing an access door to the side behind the rack gives you more than enough working room under the stairs to reach the wiring at the back of the equipment if necessary.

Distributed audio wiring, network hubs, and other low voltage can all be surface amounted on the wall behind the equipment rack where it is easily accessed, but hidden from guests. I would probably run a 60 amp service with three 6 AWG wires (hot, common, ground) in a 3/4" conduit from the sub panel in the corner of the room to the equipment closet. Run all your wall outlets for the A/V equipment from that panel to minimize ground loops and background hum on the AC line. Lastly, putting the equipment under the stairs solves your ventilation problem because the equipment closet can easily be temperature controlled with active ventilation to the common area between the workout, storage and bathrooms.

Remember to use a combination of direct and indirect lighting to illuminate your theater. A good lighting design might incorporate (1) recessed floods for the front pathway area, (2) recessed art spots shining on the walls for movie memorabilia, (3) cove lighting for the ceiling HVAC soffit, (4) rope lights for the steps, (5) task light narrow spots for the seating area, center floods for room cleaning. A Lutron Graphic Eye by the entry door would control all these switch legs with style.



I made some assumptions about your bathroom layout based upon the ABS drain pipes stubbed out of the concrete in your picture. Your original design called for a 15' long bathroom which had a lot of wasted space that would be more effectively used as part of the storage room. There is still enough space for a 3' x 5' shower, 32" vanity with sink and a toilet. Moving the storage area from where you had it and combining it with the utilities area allows for more usable shelf space for storage racks and shelving. It also gives you more room to move around while inside the storage area. The large unused common area in the middle that you had before has now been minimized as much as possible, while still being roomy enough to accommodate the easy access of guests to the theater, bathroom and workout area.
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post #20 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 09:29 PM - Thread Starter
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In my opinion, the layout below is is probably the best use of the space you have]
Wow thanks for the detailed response Peter, you're hired! Haha

I have way too many questions after all that.

How far is the front row from the screen?

Is this design big enough to have two rows of recliners? It looks tight in your design but I was already kind of compromising to have a bar or just not reclining chairs or couch in the back row if needed. For sound reasons I agree on not going further than 3ft from the back wall.

I like what you did with the storage area/bathroom. I was trying to avoid the hallway design if possible, but don't really know if that extra space is really useful or not to add something there like bar/table.



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post #21 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 09:37 PM
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The above post is well thought out. I did not like the original idea of having the egress window at the end of the storage area. First, it was not usable and secondly, if someone did not want a theater it would be more difficult to incorporate a window into a bedroom without a major tear out. Easy enough to convert the above theater to a bedroom.
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post #22 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 10:05 PM
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In my opinion, the layout below is is probably the best use of the space you have. it gives you a nice sized 18' x 18' room after creating the false wall to cover your main speakers/subs.
Wow! That is some effort (though I also wonder if the front row is too close to such a large screen).
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post #23 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 10:06 PM
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Well if it's mostly just you and the girlfriend, why not a single row of 4 seats option?

Those unused $eat$ could be money planted elsewhere.
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post #24 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 10:11 PM
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How far is the front row from the screen?

Is this design big enough to have two rows of recliners? It looks tight in your design but I was already kind of compromising to have a bar or just not reclining chairs or couch in the back row if needed. For sound reasons I agree on not going further than 3ft from the back wall.

I like what you did with the storage area/bathroom. I was trying to avoid the hallway design if possible, but don't really know if that extra space is really useful or not to add something there like bar/table.
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Wow! That is some effort (though I also wonder if the front row is too close to such a large screen).
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Yes, there is more than enough room for two rows of recliners. The front row (money seats) position in this design is about 100 - 115 inches from the screen depending on how much you have reclined.

To ensure that consumers get the most impact and immersion from their theaters , two different organizations have developed recommendations for screen sizes relative to viewing distance. SMPTE (the Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers) recommends a minimum viewing angle of 30 degrees. THX previously recommended a 36-degree optimal viewing angle for TVs, and 40 degrees for home theaters with projection screens. But with the advent of 3D in the home, THX has started suggesting 40 degrees for all home viewing.

It's easy enough, with a little math, to convert these recommended viewing angles into something that makes more practical sense: diagonal screen size in relation to viewing distance. To find SMPTE/THX's recommended viewing angel, measure the distance between your seat and the screen in inches. In the design above, your screen size is 156 inches diagonal. For SMPTE's ideal screen size, multiply by 0.6. For THX's ideal screen size, take that distance in inches, and multiply by 0.84. The front row is about 100 - 115 inches from the screen. The SMPTE (0.6) recommended distance is 93.6 inches. The THX (.84) recommended distance is 131 inches. So at 100 - 115 inches, you're right in the middle of the recommended distance.

In terms of the hall way and possible bar, I would say it depends on weather you want a dedicated home theater room as opposed to a more open multipurpose game and entertainment space. The advantages of a dedicated home theater room over multipurpose room are numerous.

- First you can really control the light and use darker colors for the walls, ceiling and seating. This will DRAMATICALLY IMPROVE the blacks and contrast ratio on your screen for a more vibrant picture. In a multipurpose room with a bar at the back, usually there is some accent lighting that stays on which really distracts from the feeling of being immersed in the film presentation. You can use an ambient light rejecting screen but these are more expensive and require a narrower viewing angel which might call for a smaller screen than 156" in this space.

- Second, it is easier to adequately pressurize a smaller space that is sealed for superior bass from the LFE channel. Larger spaces require much larger speakers to achieve the same sound pressure level. A large multipurpose room the size of your basement would take at least 2 JTR Cap 4000's to fill and even then they won't have the same chest slam on explosions as in a smaller room.

- A room the size and shape in this design will be easier to treat with absorption and diffusion panels at strategic locations. This will result in much clearer dialog and soundtrack after room correction DSP has been applied.

- A sealed dedicated home theater contains the sound downstairs. An open multipurpose room will bleed sound, especially loud bass into the house above.


Maybe you can incorporate a bar into the work out area to give people a place to socialize just outside the theater,

Last edited by Peterc613; 03-20-2017 at 10:20 PM.
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post #25 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 10:13 PM - Thread Starter
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The above post is well thought out. I did not like the original idea of having the egress window at the end of the storage area. First, it was not usable and secondly, if someone did not want a theater it would be more difficult to incorporate a window into a bedroom without a major tear out. Easy enough to convert the above theater to a bedroom.

Was thinking to go that way to get some extra length, but since Peter showed AT screen and two rows can be done in the other space the other layout just doesn't make sense for so many reasons.


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Best placement for theater in open basement

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Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
Well if it's mostly just you and the girlfriend, why not a single row of 4 seats option?



Those unused $eat$ could be money planted elsewhere.


It's good to know it the space can hold that many, but you're right. I'll probably slowly expand seating with my budget and put money other places instead of buying 8 seats initially.

Curious on your thought behind positioning the screen on the other side. I don't like the idea of blocking the egress.

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post #27 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 10:39 PM
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Yes, there is more than enough room for two rows of recliners. The front row (money seats) position in this design is about 100 - 115 inches from the screen depending on how much you have reclined.

To ensure that consumers get the most impact and immersion from their theaters , two different organizations have developed recommendations for screen sizes relative to viewing distance. SMPTE (the Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers) recommends a minimum viewing angle of 30 degrees. THX previously recommended a 36-degree optimal viewing angle for TVs, and 40 degrees for home theaters with projection screens. But with the advent of 3D in the home, THX has started suggesting 40 degrees for all home viewing.

It's easy enough, with a little math, to convert these recommended viewing angles into something that makes more practical sense: diagonal screen size in relation to viewing distance. To find SMPTE/THX's recommended viewing angel, measure the distance between your seat and the screen in inches. In the design above, your screen size is 156 inches diagonal. For SMPTE's ideal screen size, multiply by 0.6. For THX's ideal screen size, take that distance in inches, and multiply by 0.84. The front row is about 100 - 115 inches from the screen. The SMPTE (0.6) recommended distance is 93.6 inches. The THX (.84) recommended distance is 131 inches. So at 100 - 115 inches, you're right in the middle of the recommended distance.
At 9 feet (108 inches) from a 12 foot wide screen the viewing angle is 67 degrees. Definitely an engrossing experience. Bring it on!

What program did you use to build your floor plan? I like it.

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post #28 of 41 Old 03-20-2017, 11:27 PM
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That would be a gasket equipped door at the egress window, and the side panel would be hinged like a transparent door, so there's still egress. And there's
the opportunity to air out the theater every once in a while.

I just tied all the duct work on that side, that big glass hole of an egress window, plus the electrical panel, into a package that would be the start of
aiming to drive the noise floor of the room down low, and visually disguise some of the room's issues.

I am not fully convinced there's room for two rows and an AT screen. Are you planning to have reclining seating, which will eat up more room depth
the non-reclining seating? If you are aiming high, the front speakers need to be off of the the backside of an AT screen so there's no timbre shifting issues.
There's another six inches of room depth. I also would be trying to not settle for an 18' pair of room dimensions, and I would like prefer more then 3' behind
the seats. So maybe a single row begins to make more sense? That doesn't exclude you from bringing in some seats for overflow. They'd be compromised seats
for sure.

You also don't really want to sit too close to some AT screens, or you might start to see the weave on bright scenes.

Are you planning on using those BP7006 front speakers in the theater? They are not a good mesh with their bipolar design that wants a reflective front wall, versus
the usual front wall treatment to absorb energy coming off the backside of an AT screen. Which puts the two, at odds with one another.

Peter and I are very much on the same page, but moving in slightly different tangents. I'm just not sure I want to be seated less then 12', from a 12' wide AT screen.
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Now I am really curious about what screen and what projector Peter is going to reach for?

But I couldn't handle a 67 degree viewing angle.
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post #30 of 41 Old 03-21-2017, 12:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin4730 View Post
Curious on your thought behind positioning the screen on the other side. I don't like the idea of blocking the egress.
The problem with putting the screen on the egress window side is that it doesn't accommodate the layout logistics.

This room definitely has room for two rows. Plus once you have your theater up and running you'll be surprised how many of your friends want to enjoy it with you. One row only accommodates you + wife + 2 guests. Two rows accommodates 6 guests (less if you have kids). Speaking of kids, having a dedicated home theater is great way to keep them at home watching movies with their friends instead of somewhere else unaccountable.

Once you accept two rows in the design, you have to elevate the second row to get an unobstructed viewing angel for the back row. This isn't a problem , you just use a riser to elevate the back seats. However having the rear seats up on a riser in the middle of the room is awkward for entry and exit (plus a little dangerous in the dark after a few drinks). The solution is to elevate the entire rear area and have steps to the sides if the front row of seating. This works great but requires that you plan out the room with the entry door at the lowest level in the front.



In your basement, flipping the room in the opposite direction would put the entry door right where the drain pipes are for your bathroom. You could also put the screen on the wall opposite the utilities area, but then the stairs intrude and eliminate your depth (unless you are going with an open floor plan). The elongated design below was suggested in a previous post with the screen on the wall opposite the utilities area. Besides the stairs intruding into the space it also had drawbacks in terms of ambient lighting washing out your picture.

The obvious benefit of this layout is that it allows space at the back of the room for a bar area and other people to view the movie at the same time. Normally that would include some dimmed accent lighting to illuminate the extended entertainment area. The problem is that the accent lighting at the back of the room is coming from the same direction as the light from the projector. That ambient light washes out the blacks and dramatically reduces the contrast in the picture. One solution for partially lit rooms is to use an Ambient Light Rejecting (ALR) screen like the Elite dark Star linked below. However this only rejects ambient light coming from side and top angels different than the viewing angel. In your case with the ambient lighting coming from the bar area directly behind the seats, an ALR screen will not be that effective.



Budget is brought up in your other comment below. It is much less expensive to get spectacular sound in a smaller treated room than in a large untreated space. It requires smaller subs, less output from the speakers, less amplification and less room treatment to make things sound right. You can compromise and accept average sound quality within a smaller budget in the larger room. But you don't have to compromise on sound quality if you go with a smaller dedicated theater room. The money you save on equipment (especially subs) will more than pay for an extra set of seats.

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Originally Posted by Kevin4730 View Post
It's good to know it the space can hold that many, but you're right. I'll probably slowly expand seating with my budget and put money other places instead of buying 8 seats initially.

Building a great theater on a budget can be done with patience in stages. First come up with a optimum design that incorporates all your final goals. Put your initial money into the foundation of your plan and try not to cut corners so you're limited later on.

Initially put funds into building out the room. Frame a staggered stud double wall for the barrier that separates the theater area from the rest of the basement to better contain the sound leakage. Use drywall mounted on hat channels for sound absorption and good insulation for sound containment. Within the theater room, frame the false wall for a detachable acoustic screen at 156" diagonal with 24" for speakers and subs. Frame the floor for steps and raised elevation at the rear of the room. A great resource for soundproofing how-to and materials is linked below:

http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing101/



Extend the HVAC ducting feed and return from the existing HVAC ducts on the side of the basement (this makes sure the room doesn't get too hot to enjoy a movie when the thermal load includes 8 warm bodies and a hot projector with an exhaust fan). Run 12/3 Romex wire to all the receptacle locations and 14/3 wire to all the recessed lighting locations. Figure one 20 amp circuit for convenience outlets, one 20 amp circuit for lighting, one 20 amp circus for subs, and one 20 amp circuit for the projector and equipment.

Run 12 AWG speaker wire to all the locations in the plan even if you don't have the speakers yet. Terminate the speaker wires behind retrofit 1 gang plastic mud rings for the surround speakers on the walls and behind 3" round retrofit plastic mud rings on the ceiling for the Atmos speakers. Leave a loop of wire to accommodate flexibility later on. Cover the mud rings with blank switch plates. You can always mount additional surround speakers and cut out the ceiling speakers later when your ready.

Run a 2" flexible plastic conduit from the equipment area to the general location where the projector will be located. JVC tends to make the best projectors, so use the screen calculator linked below to ball park the optimum distance for mounting the projector. Use this conduit to pull an HDMI wire for the projector. DO NOT just run an HDMI cable only without the conduit. Video standards for UHD are constantly changing with ever increasing demands on the video link wiring for increased bandwidth. The HDMI wire you run today will be useless when the time comes to upgrade your projector. You will definitely need that conduit to pull whatever new wire is required for the latest video configuration.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/proj...calculator.cfm

You can start with a 5.1 system now and an inexpensive used AVR. The Denon Ci series receivers from a few years ago are extremely well built. They were $2,000 - $2,700 new, but can be found used for approx. $300 - $450. Emotiva, SVS and Elac make fantastic speakers for budget price points. For subs I wouldn't consider anything less than a JTR 118HT. Later on you can upgrade the electronics, add the second sub plus rear and Atmos speakers as money permits (What you can't do later is add wiring or framing, so do it now while you can).

If funds are really tight you start with an inexpensive used projector. The BenQ W1070 was great entry level projector under $1,000 and can be found used for even less. You can always swap it for a more expensive JVC later on. If you want to get your JVC now, the DLA-RS400U is being discounted at $2,899 at AV Science.

http://shop.avscience.com/JVC-DLA-RS...UTAaAlyo8P8HAQ

For your screen plan on starting out with something from Elite (they make rally good inexpensive screens). Their Dark Star has great contrast but in a dark room with a JVC projector the standard Matt White should suffice.

http://epvscreens.com/products/fixed...dark-star.html

Definitely start out with two rows of seats. Check out the link attached below. their prices are very reasonable:

Row of four seats - $1,596

http://www.theaterseatstore.com/octa...tegory=2267648

I agree about not blocking the rear window. Plus, frankly for safety, in the event of a fire having the egress window could be a lifesaver.

Last edited by Peterc613; 03-21-2017 at 01:26 AM.
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