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post #1 of 36 Old 09-25-2017, 11:32 AM - Thread Starter
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Little Chris's Small Home Theater Build

Hi everybody,

After almost 10 years of lurking on AVS it’s finally time for me to start my own theater build.

We took ownership of our new house a couple of months ago with a room on the first floor (in a two story house) designed to be a dedicated theater room. The room dimensions are on the small side at 14’9” x 12’10” x 8’2”. The picture below shows the floor plan, with the red box highlighting the theater. I’m from Denmark so everything is in metric units and there might be some funny words here and there



Below is a picture of the room as it was delivered from the builder. The front wall has a small window that will be blocked off. I asked the builder to leave all the wiring for electrical and lighting exposed, as I will be building a room within a room for soundproofing. My wife typically goes to bed earlier than me, so soundproofing the room is a high priority. I will be installing clips + channel + OSB/GG/drywall.



The back wall holds the door to the theater, which is a solid core door with rubber seals around the edge along with a drop down rubber profile at the bottom. I plan on upgrading it slightly to achieve even better soundproofing. More about this in a later post.



I have been making a SketchUp model in order to visualize the room. As you can see from the pictures below it is still a working model, as I haven’t decided on the final look of the theater yet. It’s been a good process making this model, as I need to overcome some obstacles in order to squeeze everything I want into such a small space. Hopefully I will have solved (most) problems beforehand this way



I’ve always wanted to try an IB sub, so even though the theater is small I will be building a false wall containing 4xFI IB3 15”. I will be at slightly more than 4xVAS, which should be close enough for good IB performance according to the guys over at the Cult. Another reason for having the false wall is also to have the LCR speakers behind the AT screen.

Below is a view of the front (with screen). I plan on using an A-lens and will therefore be building a curved screen. Screen size will be determined later.



Here is a picture of the front without the screen:



Equipment list:
Projector: JVC DLA-X5000 (same as RS400U/X550R in the US)
Screen: Seymour Center Stage UF or XD?
UHD Blu-Ray player: TBD
Receiver: Marantz SR7011
Speaker System: 7.1.4 (All DIY)
Subwoofer: IB Sub (2x2 15” Fi IB3v2)

I don’t have the space for a separate equipment room or even mounting a rack somewhere, thus I will be placing all my equipment below the screen. However, I plan on covering the area off as to not be disturbed by any lights from the electronics.

Let the fun begin!
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post #2 of 36 Old 09-25-2017, 05:46 PM
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I can't figure out how you got all that in 14' 9" of room depth, but do you know there's a lot of serious design issues with the room?
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post #3 of 36 Old 09-26-2017, 09:56 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
I can't figure out how you got all that in 14' 9" of room depth, but do you know there's a lot of serious design issues with the room?
Undoubtedly there are some design challenges that I need to tackle with the limited space. Hopefully, with the assistance from fellow AVS members and some clever DIY'ing, I can overcome most of them

Would you care to elaborate a bit on what you see as the most critical issues?

Thanks!

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post #4 of 36 Old 09-26-2017, 04:15 PM
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14'-9" doesn't seem like enough for room within a room AND 2 rows of seats. My room started at 23' long and by the time I was done soundproofing and everything I just barely fit 2 rows. Your first row looks to be WAY too close to the screen. I think in the long run you'd be better off trying to fit 4 seats in one row instead of compromising all over the place.

Multi-Rum sounds delicious by the way!
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post #5 of 36 Old 09-26-2017, 06:24 PM
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First row viewing angle isn't realistic. Front row viewers won't be able to take in, all of the screen. Front row viewers' eyes will jump around the screen and I expect the front row won't see much use. Front row ears look to be dead center of the length of the room, and there's a lot of nulls and peaks there. uF is rated for 9' viewing distance and XD is something around 10.5', to minimize seeing the screen weave.

Front row speakers are way too high. Plus you ideally want the speakers to be 6" off the backside of a woven AT screen, so
there's no timbre shifting.

The screen is boxed in, with many near boundary surfaces.

Will those subs cause the screen to vibrate/ripple?

Why waste space for a baffle wall, when there's no space to waste? Not needed for the speakers throw distance to play reference level.

Two rows of seats in 15' of depth. That is very tight, and how does the second row not end up right on the back wall? Seating on the side wall and I expect will be buried in the back corner.

Covering the gear is fine, so there's no distracting electronic displays visible, but is there any plan for proper ventilation for the gear?

And what is the HVAC plan to cool a small room with six bodies, pj, av gear? What about adequate air changes to make sure the room doesn't become stale?
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post #6 of 36 Old 09-26-2017, 06:32 PM
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I will second the opinions of my more seasoned forum members.
15' X 13' is a reasonable size for a single row of seats. Two rows is a compromise. My room is 14'X13' which seems like a bare minimum for one row. I understand though that having the entrance in the back of the room limits your seating to 3 across. That would be ideal for my situation (just myself or me, my wife and a friend) but I can see where more seats would be desirable.
XD is brighter, but from close viewing distances most would find the weave to be distracting. I imagine you will be at 9' for the front row which would be too close.
UF is the way I would go.
Subscribed to see how it all turns out. Enjoy the build.
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post #7 of 36 Old 09-26-2017, 06:38 PM
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I have modeled things on the computer before that seemed reasonable. However after mocking up the walls with pinned sheets the claustrophobia set in and I quickly abandoned my crazy rat maze plans. I suggest you do the same.
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post #8 of 36 Old 09-26-2017, 06:38 PM
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So, are you actually going to fill those six seats? Or could you get away with less seating and one row of seating, to properly accommodate a big screen?

There's lots of really nice European design rooms that are smaller, and you don't need to cram a small room with things like soffits, and columns.

Why 4x 15" drivers in a small room? (Guilty of this myself, and it's insanely overkill.)
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post #9 of 36 Old 09-26-2017, 09:09 PM
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Some feedback on the 9' viewing distance:

My room is only 9'11" deep so I'm fairly close to the screen. I had originally went with a 100"-wide 2.35:1 screen for a ~2.4x ratio of viewing distance divided by screen height. It is a very comfortable size/viewing angle but was not enough for me; along with other room upgrades I'm moving to a 120-wide 2.0-aspect screen which from initial testing (before tearing the room up) was the compelling immersion that I was looking for. That said I am building a 4-way masking system so that regular tv quality content / poor quality content can be shown at a more modest size
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post #10 of 36 Old 09-27-2017, 08:12 AM
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That's one theme I often suggest. The subtraction of seating and their cost, might very well be budget for other luxury things like masking. Pretty much everybody reaches for seating numbers for their room, thinking those seats will be filled most of the time. But will they?

I expect jjcook isn't talking about a woven AT screen though, regarding a 9' viewing distance. Screen weave on bright scenes, with shorter viewing distances, with an AT screen, can become a big distraction.

I would second David's suggestion of a quick mocking up of the space, before building anything. I got a huge reality check years ago, when I did this.
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post #11 of 36 Old 09-27-2017, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
I expect jjcook isn't talking about a woven AT screen though, regarding a 9' viewing distance. Screen weave on bright scenes, with shorter viewing distances, with an AT screen, can become a big distraction.
Actually there are a few options for AT screens that are a reasonable choice for 9' viewing distance (Chris -- see fabric thread linked in my sig for more details); Milliskin Spandex, Dreamscreen V6, DT Screens all performed very well on bright panning snow boarding content from Art of Flight at 18ftL which is the ultimate torture test for AT screen weave visibility.

I do admit its not as perfect as a Stewart 100 but given my room size I can't go non-AT even if I wanted to -- so for me its a tradeoff costing some visual quality but I do gain correct placement of LCR audio which I also value.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
I would second David's suggestion of a quick mocking up of the space, before building anything. I got a huge reality check years ago, when I did this.
A third vote from me on this. Chris should also get AT fabric samples (get large ones not the sheet-of-paper size) to test out weave visibility for himself.
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Σ Info: Δ 8.5' viewing distance AT screen fabrics comparison
Σ Builds:
Δ HT 2.0 renovation with acoustic coffered ceiling (in progress, 10% completed)
Δ Variable-aspect screen with motorized masking (on hold, have parts)
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post #12 of 36 Old 09-27-2017, 10:45 AM
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If you really need two rows the best solution is probably to forget about having an AT screen. Having the front speakers visible is perhaps not as cool looking as having an AT wall, and the audio from the center speaker wouldn't be optimal, but that would allow you to have more seats.
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post #13 of 36 Old 09-27-2017, 01:00 PM
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If you go with ~in-wall speakers then you won't lose any (or much) depth going with an acoustically transparent screen. If you plan to go forward with the pseudo-infinite baffle in a false wall then you probably have the space to do your LCR as DIY as well as you indicate. Just make sure to get the boundary step compensation correct.
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post #14 of 36 Old 09-27-2017, 01:29 PM - Thread Starter
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WOW! A lot of great feedback - highly appreciated! This will be a long post, but let's see if I can answer all the great questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by javeryh View Post
14'-9" doesn't seem like enough for room within a room AND 2 rows of seats. My room started at 23' long and by the time I was done soundproofing and everything I just barely fit 2 rows. Your first row looks to be WAY too close to the screen. I think in the long run you'd be better off trying to fit 4 seats in one row instead of compromising all over the place.

Multi-Rum sounds delicious by the way!
Haha never looked at the word that way. However, 'Multi-Rum' directly translates to 'Multi-Purpose-Room', so not as delicious as you could have wished for

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
First row viewing angle isn't realistic. Front row viewers won't be able to take in, all of the screen. Front row viewers' eyes will jump around the screen and I expect the front row won't see much use. Front row ears look to be dead center of the length of the room, and there's a lot of nulls and peaks there. uF is rated for 9' viewing distance and XD is something around 10.5', to minimize seeing the screen weave. Please see my response to jjcook below.

Front row speakers are way too high. Plus you ideally want the speakers to be 6" off the backside of a woven AT screen, so
there's no timbre shifting. I've never really understood this. Is the AT screen any different than a conventional speaker grill which sits very close to the drivers? Besides, as I will be doing DIY speakers, I plan on being able to deal with any timbre shifting in the crossover.

The screen is boxed in, with many near boundary surfaces. I plan on using black fabric panels all around the screen, including the "box" it sits in. Hopefully that will avoid any screen glare issues, which I assume you are referring to?

Will those subs cause the screen to vibrate/ripple? After what I can read from other IB sub owners at AVS and the Cult it shouldn't be an issue. By having the drivers facing each other, the mechanical forces should (pretty much) cancel each other out.

Why waste space for a baffle wall, when there's no space to waste? Not needed for the speakers throw distance to play reference level. The main reason for the baffle wall is to have the LCR speakers behind the screen - especially the center. In the past I've had the center speaker below the screen, and it always bothered me that the sound was not coming from the "right" place. So when I started designing the theater I knew I wanted a baffle wall. The IB sub is a secondary priority, but something I've always wanted to try.

Two rows of seats in 15' of depth. That is very tight, and how does the second row not end up right on the back wall? Seating on the side wall and I expect will be buried in the back corner. I have tried explaining the reasoning for my seating distances further down in this post. You are right though, that the back side seat will be buried in the corner. However, I might as well use that space for seating than just empty space.

Covering the gear is fine, so there's no distracting electronic displays visible, but is there any plan for proper ventilation for the gear? Yes, I will be using silent fans to exhaust the hot air into the return of our ventilation system.

And what is the HVAC plan to cool a small room with six bodies, pj, av gear? What about adequate air changes to make sure the room doesn't become stale? All the AV gear and PJ will vent directly into the return of the ventilation system. The room itself is roughly 1400 CF. Assuming that I would need to exchange air six times per hour leads to 1400CFx6/60min = 140 CFM. I plan on installing 230 CFM silent fans in a push/pull configuration pulling fresh air from the intake and pushing hot air into the return. These will be placed in the soffits in order to minimise noise, and I can possibly run them at lower RPMs as well.
Thanks a lot for taking the time to post so many great questions, Tedd! I've tried answering in blue above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidK442 View Post
I have modeled things on the computer before that seemed reasonable. However after mocking up the walls with pinned sheets the claustrophobia set in and I quickly abandoned my crazy rat maze plans. I suggest you do the same.
Me too I have tried projecting a movie onto the wall to see what size I would be comfortable with, and I realised that I prefer a fairly close seating distance. I also always choose a seat in the front half of the theaters - I like the extra immersion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
So, are you actually going to fill those six seats? Or could you get away with less seating and one row of seating, to properly accommodate a big screen?

There's lots of really nice European design rooms that are smaller, and you don't need to cram a small room with things like soffits, and columns.

Why 4x 15" drivers in a small room? (Guilty of this myself, and it's insanely overkill.)
I hope to be able to fill all the seats from time to time - especially with friends, family and the neighbouring kids. I host a decent amount of movie nights and events, so maximising seating is a priority. If I overestimate I can always get rid of the front row and install more luxury seating in the back. But it is a very good suggestion and something I will be evaluating once I've gotten some hours on the projector

Totally agree, I will not try and cram columns in there. I will though install a soffit for lighting, ventilation, cables and hiding the projector (for noise reduction).

4x15" drivers is definitely overkill! However, I know I want dual subwoofers in the room for better bass response. If I am to install an IB sub using 2x18" drivers then I'll have to build them facing out into the theater (and not each other), which means that the false wall would need to be massively re-inforced to cope with the mechanical forces from the drivers. I guess the alternative is to use some sort of box subs, but since I want the false wall for the center speaker anyway, I can put an IB sub there as well. And by having this much overkill I imagine I would never need to upgrade to any other subwoofer

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjcook View Post
Some feedback on the 9' viewing distance:

My room is only 9'11" deep so I'm fairly close to the screen. I had originally went with a 100"-wide 2.35:1 screen for a ~2.4x ratio of viewing distance divided by screen height. It is a very comfortable size/viewing angle but was not enough for me; along with other room upgrades I'm moving to a 120-wide 2.0-aspect screen which from initial testing (before tearing the room up) was the compelling immersion that I was looking for. That said I am building a 4-way masking system so that regular tv quality content / poor quality content can be shown at a more modest size
Exactly my thinking as well. I have tried different screen sizes and found that I like to sit fairly close to the screen for better immersion.

My seating distances will be ~11' for the back row and ~7' for the front row. The back row will be my primary seating position as this will also put my ears and eyes at a better level with the center of the screen. Assuming a 47" high CIH-image this equates to 2.8xSH and 1.8xSH for the two rows, which for the second row at least, seems ideal to for my taste. When the front row is in use, I plan to zoom in using lens memory to get a slightly smaller screen size. I will start with a 2-way DIY masking system, but later on I might upgrade to a 4-way DIY masking system if I find the need when zooming in.



These distances (when taking the depth of the false wall into account) should put my seating distances at roughly 0.2xL and 0.45xL (measured from back of the room), which accordingly to the excellent presentation by Anthony Grimani in Home Theater Geeks Episode 177 and 178, should avoid any major peaks or nulls in the response - fingers crossed



Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
That's one theme I often suggest. The subtraction of seating and their cost, might very well be budget for other luxury things like masking. Pretty much everybody reaches for seating numbers for their room, thinking those seats will be filled most of the time. But will they?

I expect jjcook isn't talking about a woven AT screen though, regarding a 9' viewing distance. Screen weave on bright scenes, with shorter viewing distances, with an AT screen, can become a big distraction.

I would second David's suggestion of a quick mocking up of the space, before building anything. I got a huge reality check years ago, when I did this.
As mentioned above, I will try an re-evaluate the need for two rows after some time using the theater.

Great point on the woven AT screens, Tedd! I will need to investigate this more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjcook View Post
Actually there are a few options for AT screens that are a reasonable choice for 9' viewing distance (Chris -- see fabric thread linked in my sig for more details); Milliskin Spandex, Dreamscreen V6, DT Screens all performed very well on bright panning snow boarding content from Art of Flight at 18ftL which is the ultimate torture test for AT screen weave visibility.

I do admit its not as perfect as a Stewart 100 but given my room size I can't go non-AT even if I wanted to -- so for me its a tradeoff costing some visual quality but I do gain correct placement of LCR audio which I also value.

A third vote from me on this. Chris should also get AT fabric samples (get large ones not the sheet-of-paper size) to test out weave visibility for himself.
Awesome jjcook! I will definitely be checking out your tests of different AT screen materials.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silva741 View Post
If you really need two rows the best solution is probably to forget about having an AT screen. Having the front speakers visible is perhaps not as cool looking as having an AT wall, and the audio from the center speaker wouldn't be optimal, but that would allow you to have more seats.
As stated above in the reply to Tedd, it is a high priority for me to have the LCR (especially the center) speakers behind the screen, even though it means I have to compromise a little on screen distance

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjcook View Post
If you go with ~in-wall speakers then you won't lose any (or much) depth going with an acoustically transparent screen. If you plan to go forward with the pseudo-infinite baffle in a false wall then you probably have the space to do your LCR as DIY as well as you indicate. Just make sure to get the boundary step compensation correct.
I will not be going for in-wall speakers. Instead I will design the DIY speakers for infinite baffle placement.
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post #15 of 36 Old 09-27-2017, 02:41 PM
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I think it's time for Tony Grimani to do an updated video presentation of his 2011 HT cruise woven AT screen seminar.

So you have a baffle wall that eats up 8" of room depth, in 14' 9" of room? And your front row is at 7', which means that front row is at the center point
of the room's effective depth. Spot on for a lot of nulls and peaks, audio-wise. And screen weave is going to be an issue, but maybe some of the very latest screen
materials might bail you out video-wise.

I think the AT screen and at least some manual masking panels, is definitely the way to go. But I'd propose placing a single row of seats at 2/3 rds row length, and then
bringing in overflow seating for crowds.
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post #16 of 36 Old 09-28-2017, 11:02 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post
I think it's time for Tony Grimani to do an updated video presentation of his 2011 HT cruise woven AT screen seminar.

So you have a baffle wall that eats up 8" of room depth, in 14' 9" of room? And your front row is at 7', which means that front row is at the center point
of the room's effective depth. Spot on for a lot of nulls and peaks, audio-wise. And screen weave is going to be an issue, but maybe some of the very latest screen
materials might bail you out video-wise.

I think the AT screen and at least some manual masking panels, is definitely the way to go. But I'd propose placing a single row of seats at 2/3 rds row length, and then
bringing in overflow seating for crowds.
I don't know where the 8" came from, but I can assure you that the front row will not be at the exact center of the room. It will be at the 0.45L as stated in my previous post

I'm currently looking at ultrafine weave AT screens to minimise the weave visibility. The DreamScreen Ultraweave V6 AT screen looks interesting.
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post #17 of 36 Old 09-28-2017, 03:14 PM
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8" is the thinnest baffle wall I've seen. Have you seen thinner?

.45 of length is still pretty close to dead center audio-wise, when you're talking a short room.
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post #18 of 36 Old 09-28-2017, 09:22 PM - Thread Starter
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8" is definitely very thin. Mine will be around 16" deep, which should be enough depth for me to flush mount my speakers. And since it is a high priority to me to have the center speaker behind the screen, I'm willing to give up that space.

The .45L mentioned in Tony's slides seems to be a good starting point. Again, I will avoid the dead center of the room.

I will soon post some pictures of my soundproofing efforts. Stay tuned
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post #19 of 36 Old 09-30-2017, 06:12 AM
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You have very thick walls. If you had a big picture window instead of the small window, you could use the extra depth of the window alcove for the front speakers. It's a shame that the builder didn't just push the steps up the wall a bit and make that room come out an extra metre to the same line as the adjacent bedroom.
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post #20 of 36 Old 09-30-2017, 11:05 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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You have very thick walls. If you had a big picture window instead of the small window, you could use the extra depth of the window alcove for the front speakers. It's a shame that the builder didn't just push the steps up the wall a bit and make that room come out an extra metre to the same line as the adjacent bedroom.
Yup, it is very typical for new houses in Denmark to have thick walls due to strict building codes. The exterior walls comprise of 4" bricks, 8" insulation and 5" light weight concrete. The benefit is that the house uses very little energy on heating (no cooling required in Denmark).

We designed the house ourselves, and we deliberately chose the exterior staircase to come down at the home theater wall. I would have loved to push it a bit so the theater could have been several feet longer. However that would mean the stairs would come down in front of the top left room, which was a no go due to other reasons. That is always the challenge when designing a house on your own - changing one thing here influences another thing there
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post #21 of 36 Old 09-30-2017, 11:52 AM - Thread Starter
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I have a confession to make - I’m actually two and a half months into the build already. Currently, I’m doing the last bit of mudding and sanding on the drywall.
I will use the next couple of posts showing what I’ve been doing.

Installing clips and channels
I knew I wanted to try and do soundproofing to limit sounds leaking out of the theater. And since my room is quite small I went with GenieClips to keep the space lost to a minimum. I ordered these from GIK Acoustics in the UK.

I started by mounting the clips to all the walls spaced apart by the amount prescribed in the instructions.


My two-year old son helped inspect that I did a proper job


After installing all clips, I could install the furring channels. They snapped very easily into place. I made sure to have the prescribed overlap between the channels and secured them to each other using self-tapping screws.


I was at some point considering doing communicating doors, so I added some extra channels around the existing doorframe to reinforce the new wall. Currently I don’t expect to go down this route. I will try first to add some extra soundproofing seals around the existing door (besides the ones that are already there) and evaluate the effect.


For installing clips in the ceiling, I used a self-levelling cross-line laser to line them up with the floor joists above so the screws for the clips would have something solid to grab onto.



In the above pictures you are also able to see the intake and return of the ventilation system in the ceiling. I will be redirecting air to the desired locations (as to avoid bypass) by using insulated flex duct running in the soffits. More on that later.

New floors
I took out the existing wooden floors, as I wanted to add some extra measures of soundproofing there as well. I then put in place a rubber material called GenieMat (also from GIK Acoustics), designed to be underneath the floors to reduce impact noise travelling to adjacent rooms.


I then installed wooden subflooring, making sure there was no contact between the floors and the existing walls. The final room will have carpet installed.


Insulation
I added insulation to all the walls and ceiling. To keep the insulation in place while I screwed it to the ceiling I added fishing wire between the channels. It worked out great and it could easily be cut down again after use.


That’s it for now. Next up, OSB and drywall!
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Last edited by Little Chris; 09-30-2017 at 11:56 AM.
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post #22 of 36 Old 10-10-2017, 12:50 PM - Thread Starter
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OSB and Drywall

After the furring channels and insulation was in place I could start putting up the 5/8” OSB sheets. I chose OSB as the first layer to be able to screw things to the walls wherever I wanted. I’m sure I’ll be very happy with that decision later on in the process.

Luckily the ceiling height made installing the sheets on the walls very easy, as a full sheet fit perfectly without the need to cut anything while still allowing for a small air gab in both top and bottom.


Back of the room after OSB is installed and all seems have been caulked with acoustic caulk.


I waited as long as I possibly could before blocking off the window on the front wall. I started by applying a film on the inside to make it look like frozen glass. In the picture it looks as if the film effect is very uneven, but in reality it is very even. I painted a piece of MDF white on one side and installed it in the window area, so from the outside it looks like a white wall through the frozen glass.


I filled up the area with insulation and installed a wooden brace to support a genie clip, which was going to be installed in that location later.


A sheet of OSB was then fixed in place and acoustic caulk was put around the edge. Bye bye daylight!


And of course, the mandatory picture of the sticky icky stuff! 48 tubes of Green Glue ready to go!


Man, it smells bad too when you apply it!


First sheet of drywall is up! Do you think I used enough screws?! Had some issues with the drill in the beginning so many of the screws were being screwed in too far and breaking the paper. Luckily, I got it fixed for the following sheets.


My trusty drywall lift in action! It was really handy to be able to install the drywall sheets in the ceiling single handedly.


The vents got a beat of caulk as well before the drywall went up.


And the final product. It’s almost depressing that after MANY hours of work, you are back to where you started – a room with four walls and a ceiling. Let’s hope it has been worth the effort




Next up is mudding, taping, sanding, mudding, sanding, mudding and sanding!
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post #23 of 36 Old 10-10-2017, 01:19 PM
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Are your original walls concrete?
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post #24 of 36 Old 10-10-2017, 09:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PreciseD View Post
Are your original walls concrete?
They are made of aerated concrete, which has lots of small pores in them, thus providing good insulating capabilities, while still being strong enough to be load bearing. They are also very easy to install without having to use heavy machinery.

Aerated Concrete block with the pore structure visible:


The first floor of our house being erected using these 16" by 24" blocks:
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post #25 of 36 Old 10-13-2017, 11:29 AM - Thread Starter
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Drywall Dust

I was going back and forth about whether to do the mudding, taping and sanding myself or contract it out. Eventually I ended up doing it myself, but let me say, it will be the last time I do such a thing - I'm just not very good at it, and it took me ages to finish!

First layer of mud and armor paper up:




Here is a photo of all the dust I managed to create after the second layer of mud had been applied and the subsequent sanding. Those dust particles are really fine, so I was wearing a respirator every time I was in there sanding away - my lungs were happy about that


I ended up applying three layers of mud, but don't have any pictures of the "final" stage.

I'm soooo happy that the drywall stage is over. Now I can start building stuff, which will have a much more visual impact on the room itself (and bring more satisfaction to my efforts).

This also brings my thread up to the current state of progress. This weekend I'll be starting the false wall and soffit construction.
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Last edited by Little Chris; 10-13-2017 at 11:32 AM.
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post #26 of 36 Old 10-16-2017, 11:36 AM - Thread Starter
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Beginning of soffit and false wall construction

This past weekend marked the beginning of “actual” theater construction, which is immensely satisfying compared to putting up drywall.

I got off work on Friday at noon and went straight to the local wood supply store to pick up some lumber. Luckily, I was able to find some very straight pieces of 1.5”x2.3”. This size is commonly used in Denmark for dividing walls, and the pieces are therefore very cheap. I plan to be using these quite a lot in the build.

I started by framing out various parts for the false wall. It might not make a whole lot of sense why the wood supports are placed where they are, but hopefully this will become more apparent as I progress with the build. I can say that the vertically aligned blocks close to the center of the room will be supports for ventilations channels for the AV gear. More info will follow


I then started measuring out for the soffit supports on the walls. Using my trusted cross-line laser was greatly helpful and it made installing the supports easy and fast.


As you can see from the below picture it becomes very easy to align the wood support with the laser line and just screw it to the wall. This was the point where I REALLY started cherishing the fact that I put up sheets of OSB for the first layer. No need to worry about placement, just screw the darn thing to the wall and move on!


Showing the back of the room with the wall support for the soffit:


With the wall support up, I could start building the vertical section of the soffit. I was considering building it as a wooden I-beam, since this would be very easy to make and could be made almost dead straight. However, I opted for the “conventional” approach, since I needed access to the soffit from the side when installing lighting and ventilation at a later stage. Here is a picture of one of the vertical frame sections:


And here is a picture of the back of the room showing them in place. The “missing” part of the soffit in the middle of the back wall marks the location of the projector. Since the soffit is connected to the ceiling, which is connected (through clips+channel) to the floor joists above I am concerned about floor vibrations travelling down to the projector. Therefore, I plan to be mounting a shelf to the wall, which will be decoupled from the rest of the soffit for the projector to be vibration free (fingers crossed). I will be making a small extension of the soffit in front of the projector, so that it will integrate nicely with the rest of the soffit. Anybody tried this approach?




I have also started building the two IB sub manifolds, which I need to install for the false wall to progress. More info on this coming soon. Stay tuned!
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post #27 of 36 Old 10-16-2017, 08:22 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Chris View Post
... This was the point where I REALLY started cherishing the fact that I put up sheets of OSB for the first layer. No need to worry about placement, just screw the darn thing to the wall and move on!
I've just learned from this post that some people are having issues with mud seams between drywall cracking, probably due to wood movement from the first layer of OSB. I don't expect this to be an issue for my design as I will be covering all surfaces with fabric panels (also the ceiling). The design will be employing staggered wall panels similar to the great looking theater of @landshark1 (link). Still deciding on the color scheme.
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post #28 of 36 Old 10-17-2017, 05:42 AM
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Where are your electrical plugs on the walls? How do you power anything?

JAMES JONES
HT1.0 | HT2.0
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post #29 of 36 Old 10-17-2017, 12:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by sirjaymz View Post
Where are your electrical plugs on the walls? How do you power anything?
Good observation. I guess I never really explained the logic behind all the electrical wiring coming down from the ceiling

Currently, I don't have any electrical plugs in the room, so I'm getting my power from an extension cord coming in under the door (seen in some of the pictures). Most of the wires hanging down are for lighting and will be hidden in the soffit. All the wires coming out through the hole in the drywall at the bottom of the front wall (near the equipment area) includes power, network and conduit to the rest of the house. These wires will be placed in electrical wall boxes in a couple of weeks, when my brother-in-law comes and helps with all the electrical wiring.

I plan on running conduit to the projector location and riser, to be able to have access to power, HDMI, CAT 6, etc. Since I will be covering all the walls with fabric panels, I chose to run as much of the wiring as possible inside the soundproofed shell.
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post #30 of 36 Old 10-19-2017, 10:21 AM - Thread Starter
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IB Sub Manifolds

During the drywall stage I also began the construction of the IB sub manifolds. Each manifold will hold 2 x 15” FI IB3v2. They should move plenty of air for my needs

I started by gluing 3/4" MDF and 3/4" OSB sheets together and then routed the openings for the drivers using my homemade router circle jig.


Then the boxes were glued together:




After it was all said and done, I had two boxes ready for primer and paint. Note that I only have one layer of OSB in the top and bottom of the manifolds (as opposed to OSB+MDF on the sides and back). The second layer of MDF will be “added” by the false wall when I install them.


And after some black paint, they look like this:


My two-year old “inspector” checked the drivers before they went into the manifolds. Luckily he approved them all


Here are some pictures of the drivers installed in the manifolds. The plan is to install LED lighting inside the cabinets in order to show the drivers behind some acoustically transparent fabric before movie time!




After the above pictures was taken, I added some extra mounting brackets to the drivers, so that they would be firmly secured to the cabinet itself.

And finally, the manifolds in their final location. As mentioned earlier, the second layer of MDF is coming from the bottom of the false wall and a top plate, which is the next thing to be installed.


Before sealing it up I need to run the speaker wires (and LED lighting) from the equipment area and test that everything is working. The plan is to screw (not glue) the two manifolds in place from the inside, where the back of the drivers are located. This will enable me to pull the manifolds out of the false wall, if I ever need to at some point.
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