Can I skim coat regular drywall? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 08-29-2003, 10:09 AM - Thread Starter
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Well, I have hung the rock and taping starts tomorrow. Since I have never finished sheetrock before, I am concerned that I would be satisfied with the efforts.

Since I taped the first layer, I have now had some practice, but I am still not sure how the final effort will look. So, if I don't like it, can I have the entire surface skim coated, or did I need to install blue board for that?

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Hal
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post #2 of 13 Old 08-29-2003, 11:10 AM
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No blue board needed. Feel free to coat the whole surface of the regular board with as much mud as you would like! Luckily a good friend of mine does drywall professionally, so he helped me hang, and gave me tips for mudding too. Anyway, I smeared my whole wall with as much as 1/4" of mud in some locations to create a plastered effect. It worked beautifully and no problems at all. Happy mudding!

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post #3 of 13 Old 08-29-2003, 11:29 AM
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I will be dryalling soon...

Nobail,

What thickness of rock did you go with??
What is the standard thickness for HT application?
THANKS
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post #4 of 13 Old 08-29-2003, 11:37 AM - Thread Starter
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I used two layers of 1/2 inch wallboard for both walls and ceiling. Some people go 5/8" on the ceiling, but I went for the lighter drywall.

Oz... Thanks for the advice. I won't worry if I decide to put on a skim coat of mud.

- Hal
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post #5 of 13 Old 08-29-2003, 08:23 PM
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A trick I saw was to skim the walls in columns, i.e. skim a very thin coat and then skip an area the width of the trowel and continue down the wall making stripes. Then go back after dry and skim the bare strips. This supposedly avoids any sanding which could be considerable if you don't get it perfectly smooth the first time out.
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post #6 of 13 Old 08-30-2003, 09:29 AM
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This will never work. If this method would avoid the need to sand, pros would do this and I can assure you they don't. Dry wall finishing takes practice, practice, practice, like any other of the trades skills.

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post #7 of 13 Old 08-30-2003, 11:36 AM
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This will never work. If this method would avoid the need to sand, pros would do this and I can assure you they don't. Dry wall finishing takes practice, practice, practice, like any other of the trades skills.
I think you have to sand/sponge the regular joints to get them smooth. Then you can skim the whole wall. As to it not working, you might want to tell Bob Vila that because he seemed to think it was pretty slick.
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post #8 of 13 Old 08-30-2003, 12:35 PM
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We started screwing the field area of the board in pairs to avoid pops several years ago. The result was larger mudded areas throughout. One of the trouble spots is feathering the mudded area to a bare board surface. Instead of feathering several circular patches individually we mud all the screws on a stud as one vertical stripe. By the time the mudding is done on the seams there is actually very little bare board surface left. By mudding in the area in between the stud screws and the seams you eliminate all feathering from mudded areas to bare board. Consider that coventionally you are dealing with three textures, the paper on the virgin board, the super smooth sanded areas, and also the inbetween areas of board that have not been mudded but have been scuffed in the sanding process. We simply sand the entire wall surface instead of spot sanding. It may sound like more work but at least for me it is way less to get it right. I cant see eliminating the sanding though. I could never trowel dry wall mud to the same result as plaster veneer.

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post #9 of 13 Old 08-30-2003, 01:08 PM
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Bob Villa is not my idea of an authority on any of the building trades.

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Now it's: "Beer, The Old Lady and TV"

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post #10 of 13 Old 08-30-2003, 03:29 PM
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Bob Villa is not my idea of an authority on any of the building trades.
[pout] Take it back! [/pout]

Just to clarify, Bob He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named (but if you're gonna his last name only has one L) was touring a site where the drywall contractor was applying this finish. Having seen the mud on the whole wall done a couple of different ways, it was clear to me that this technique would keep the finish a predictable depth and minimize or eliminate sanding of the finish coat. Before you make another blanket statement about sanding remember that when plaster is applied it isn't sanded either. <I know that because I watch Bob>.
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post #11 of 13 Old 08-30-2003, 07:29 PM
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FYI, a skim coat over the entire surface of drywall is termed a Level 5 finish. A Level 4 finish is the typical that you will get if you hire a local drywaller. Level 5 finishes are as you might expect...not cheap.

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post #12 of 13 Old 08-31-2003, 11:06 AM
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A contractor friend of mine recommended watering down mud and loading it into a hopper gun (like used for popcorn ceilings) to skimcoat. Anyone heard of, or tried this before???
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post #13 of 13 Old 08-31-2003, 12:15 PM
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A level 5 finish refers to the degree of smoothness and flatness of the prepared board. This rating system was designed to make specifications clear as to what was expected when the final finish was applied. Gloss paints are the primary concern. It should be noted that applying a skimcoat over the entire board does not necessarily create a level 5 finish. In fact DIYers should be discouraged to try this if they have little finishing experience. This is not a repair method for a failed "level 4 attempt" you must achieve a true level 4 finish then make it a level 5. A level 4 is what most would hope to achieve in a HT anyway. This is not to say that you cant make an attractive finish by troweling a decorative texture coat over a job that is less than level 4 but dont expect it to magically come out like glass. Skim coating takes practice. As I said I cannot skim drywall mud without some sanding but I can trowel plaster and hardcoat. BTW there are other coating products designed to achieve a level 5 more along the lines of paint rather than trowel work. I have not tried them but will be shortly.

Wayne
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