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post #271 of 945 Old 09-29-2006, 12:57 PM
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Cool! - good luck and lets see the pics when you are done!

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post #272 of 945 Old 09-29-2006, 04:12 PM
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What did you do around your light switch ?
What did you use to attach/remove your hidden door panels? Velcro?

An amateur built the Ark. Titanic was built by professionals. Of course Noah took a little advice.
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post #273 of 945 Old 09-29-2006, 04:28 PM
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For the light switch (Grafik Eye), I put 1" 1/2 furring strips around the box and planned to staple the fabric to it after I cut out the fabric. It turns out the frames are so taught, that the cut hole held it's own and I just mounted the face plate over the cut hole and the furring strips.

For the hidden door frames, I first installed a 20 inch door on hinges. Then I made the 3 frames. I used a nail gun to nail the frames to the door, then I drilled holes in the other side of the door and screwed the frames on tight.

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post #274 of 945 Old 10-30-2006, 09:40 AM
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Would using 1/2" plywood over frame construction with the "frames" nailed directly to the plywood cause acoustical problems? Essentially you would be using plywood instead of drywall. I guess you would need something between the frame and the plywood or it would rattle.
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post #275 of 945 Old 10-31-2006, 06:52 AM
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Very nice...I love the look.

I did not cover my walls with fabric when I built my theater and regret that very much; so much so that I am thinking about doing that now.

Any thoughts on how difficult this (using your wood frames) would be for a retro fit? The obvious problems/issues would be the existing electrical since I would need to extend the boxes (there are ways to do that but I'm just wondering how hard it would be to get it all "lined up"). Framing around the openings with furring strips and stretching the fabric over it would be straight-forward; not sure how that would look using the frames.

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post #276 of 945 Old 10-31-2006, 01:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by judsonp View Post

Would using 1/2" plywood over frame construction with the "frames" nailed directly to the plywood cause acoustical problems? Essentially you would be using plywood instead of drywall. I guess you would need something between the frame and the plywood or it would rattle.

I think it depends on your local building inspector. The drywall is partly a fire code thing. Plus the drywall would be less expensive. You might want to do both.
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post #277 of 945 Old 10-31-2006, 01:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkv View Post

Very nice...I love the look.

I did not cover my walls with fabric when I built my theater and regret that very much; so much so that I am thinking about doing that now.

Any thoughts on how difficult this (using your wood frames) would be for a retro fit? The obvious problems/issues would be the existing electrical since I would need to extend the boxes (there are ways to do that but I'm just wondering how hard it would be to get it all "lined up"). Framing around the openings with furring strips and stretching the fabric over it would be straight-forward; not sure how that would look using the frames.

I did not use furring strips for the electrical boxes. I used a low voltage box as an extension to the existing box. The extension bos was attached to the frame and pressed into the existing wall box. See the photo below of the back of a fabric frame with the extention box.
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post #278 of 945 Old 11-28-2006, 02:06 PM
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Great job on your HT, give me lots of ideas. Few questions, what are the dimensions of the soffit light tray you built and what type of rope lighthing did you use? is the generic stuff from HD or Lowes OK for this type of application. Finally, for the what is the sequence for stapling the GOM on the soffit, it would seem that it would be pretty hard to staple the fabric on the inside of the light tray.
Thanks
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post #279 of 945 Old 11-28-2006, 03:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stephan_bond View Post

Great job on your HT, give me lots of ideas. Few questions, what are the dimensions of the soffit light tray you built and what type of rope lighthing did you use? is the generic stuff from HD or Lowes OK for this type of application. Finally, for the what is the sequence for stapling the GOM on the soffit, it would seem that it would be pretty hard to staple the fabric on the inside of the light tray.
Thanks

Thanks, my family realy does enjoy the theater.

To answer your questions:

Sofit dimensions

A blind seam was used, like below, under the sofit. the fabric was then wraped up and over the sofit and staples in the light tray.



Rope lights are standard HD issue on a dimmer.
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post #280 of 945 Old 11-28-2006, 07:48 PM
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First time using rope lighting I went the Home Depot route but following advice from some others here I bought it on the web for the second application. On the web I was able to get white vs. clear (more even glow) and cuttable along 12 inch segments, while the Home Depot variety I found was not cuttable. I ended up with a 48' roll.
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post #281 of 945 Old 11-29-2006, 08:55 AM
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When you build fabric covered panels like this, how do you attach them to the wall?
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post #282 of 945 Old 11-30-2006, 12:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gobble View Post

When you build fabric covered panels like this, how do you attach them to the wall?

There have been three techniques used and discussed in this thread:

1. Liquid nails and two inch brads
2. Velcro
3. French cleats
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post #283 of 945 Old 12-01-2006, 05:56 AM
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Couple quick questions.

1) Any tips on dealing with slight variations of height at the ceiling/sofits if you are starting at the top and working down

2) What are your thoughts on using near flush mount clips that are 1/8" thick such as these http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...=flush%20mount
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post #284 of 945 Old 12-01-2006, 07:47 AM
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Two things come to mind on those clips - which I have considered as well -

1) How to deal with the "gap" at the top - would have to come up with a decorative strip of some sort, or have the top row of frames fastened in by a different method.

2) Would they "rattle" with the bass ? I have never used these clips but if they are snug enough I doubt there would be a rattle issue - could be fixed with electrical tape if so.

Worth considering and I will be trying out a test frame with them when (if) I ever get to building my ht.
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post #285 of 945 Old 12-01-2006, 12:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmmkam View Post

Couple quick questions.

1) Any tips on dealing with slight variations of height at the ceiling/sofits if you are starting at the top and working down

2) What are your thoughts on using near flush mount clips that are 1/8" thick such as these

I started on the top and worked down. The variations were compensated for at the floor, away for your eyes.

With any king of clip or French cleat you are going to start on the bottom, then work up this will leave a gap above the last row. As you need that clearance to get the clip over and then slid it down on too the clip.

You could add some standard or crown molding to cover the gap. This would also compensate for the variations you asked about.
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post #286 of 945 Old 12-02-2006, 09:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gobble View Post

When you build fabric covered panels like this, how do you attach them to the wall?


I used a different approach. I used 2 inch finishing nails in a 18 gauge nail gun into the double sheetrock with nothing else to hold it. If I want or need to replace a panel, just pull off the wall after cutting the fabric out to get a hold - or put a nail partially into the frame and pull hard.

I also worked from the floor up and buried the bottom of the panels into the floor molding that I installed first 1" away from the walls. This hid the bottom seam and allowed for a square approach from the floor up. The top down is a great way to go if you put your molding up last.

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post #287 of 945 Old 12-03-2006, 10:22 PM
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I'm under taking a project to put velvet up on the ceiling to control light reflections above the screen (currently the ceiling is just painted a dark color but still gives off too much sheen).

My plan is to purchase a 4x8 foot piece of Styrofoam insulation panel 3/4" thick and wrap it with the velvet.

However I'm wondering what is the best way to do the corners? For instance I will wrap it so that the fabric is pulled tight across the piece, down the side, and onto the back side. This way none of the edges show.

However I'm not sure what the best way is to fold the edges where the corners are so that the it tucks away nicely behind the piece. Any pointers for this?

Also my plan is to use 3M 77 spray adhesive to attach the back of the velvet to the plastic that is attached overtop the strofom.

I then plan to attach this to the drywall ceiling using drywall screws. However I am a bit concerned about the drywall screws being visible which may not look good. Any ideas?

Thanks!
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post #288 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 09:31 AM
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lovingdvd,
Styrofoam is strongly advised against in a home theater you would be inviting an acoustic mess. and if you did use it, and wrap it without a frame it will dent and crumble or break.

I really suggest you use one of the techniques others have tried and had success with

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post #289 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 11:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McCall View Post

lovingdvd,
Styrofoam is strongly advised against in a home theater you would be inviting an acoustic mess. and if you did use it, and wrap it without a frame it will dent and crumble or break.

I really suggest you use one of the techniques others have tried and had success with

Thanks for the heads up. I'm not too concerned about the impact on acoustics the material will only cover an area about 8' x 5' on the ceiling in front of the screen. Considering the room is 20x20 hopefully any impact this has on sound would be minimal.

I am however concerned about any crumbling or breaking. Since its up on the ceiling and not on the walls hopefully it won't be subject to much impact.

What other material is recommended for this type of backing for the fabric beside the insulation panels? I'd like to use something light weight if possible just to make it much easier to work with. Thanks.
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post #290 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 11:25 AM
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I would urge against Styrofoam for potential fire hazard.

If your looking just for a light-weight method why not just use 1/4" ply? You can always border it with battens to give extra thickness if required.

Don't see how it would be worse acousticly than drywall.

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post #291 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BritInVA View Post

I would urge against Styrofoam for potential fire hazard.

If your looking just for a light-weight method why not just use 1/4" ply? You can always border it with battens to give extra thickness if required.

Don't see how it would be worse acousticly than drywall.

Thanks for the tip. Is 1/4" ply subject to warping? I want it to lay perfectly flat against the ceiling so I'm wondering about that.

Also how would you recommend putting a border around this 1/4" ply? For instance in my case I'll only be covering the area in the middle of the ceiling in front of the screen with the material. I'm afraid it will look kinda weird with just this black velvet stuck in the middle of the screen. Any suggestions for adding a nice finishing touch around the edges? The thiner the better (for instance I wouldn't want to use a 1" piece of molding). Is there a nice way to put a finish on a 1/4" ply?

Thanks again!
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post #292 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 11:47 AM
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Also - if I use the 1/4" ply how would you recommend mounting everything to the ceiling?

For instance I could use adhesive spray to mount the fabric to the wood - but how do I mount the wood to the ceiling? I could use screws but would be afraid even the flat black screw heads would be noticeable with the projector on and the light bouncing off the ceiling.
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post #293 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 12:18 PM
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When I did my star ceiling with ply had same concern on warping so used a batten structure to guard against this.

Maybe use industrial velco to attach to ceiling.

Cheers,
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post #294 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BritInVA View Post

When I did my star ceiling with ply had same concern on warping so used a batten structure to guard against this.

Maybe use industrial velco to attach to ceiling.

Cheers,
Mark

Thanks Mark. I'm not at all familiar with batten - can you explain what a batten structure is and what you created. Any close up pics available of this?

Although the Styrofoam insulation would have been easiest I agree its not the best material for a number of reasons.

My hardware store has two types of boards the look like they could work. The first was 3/16" 4'x8' tempered hardboard ("Eucaboard"). This seems nice and flat (no warp) and quite sturdy, but it quite heavy which may make it more challenging to attach to the ceiling.

The other choice they had was a 5.2 (not sure what this measurement is, but it looked like it was about 3/16" think) 4x8 moisture resistant Lauan. This was similar to the hardboard but much lighter.

Another thought I had was to perhaps use some sort of thick poster board from an arts supply place. If I went with something light weight like this, I think the Velcro could be a great option.

Thoughts on this?
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post #295 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 03:24 PM
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Battens are just thin strips of wood to provide additional rigidness. You can put around perimeter and cris-cross thru center.

However if you use industrial velcro, around perimter and within the center area you may not need to make it more righd as it will have the drywall ceiling to stop it from warping. Maybe add a few brads or finish nailes which will disapear in the velvet..

I would use the Lauan ply. Its light and fairly rigid.

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post #296 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 03:42 PM - Thread Starter
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You could also apply the fabric frame approach to the ceiling. With a little creativity you could create some nice pattern or even a design or something.
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post #297 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 04:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BritInVA View Post

I would use the Lauan ply. Its light and fairly rigid.

Thanks. At that point however couldn't I just use a sturdy cardboard instead of the Lauan? Cardboard would have about the same thickness and be sufficient to give the velvet a sturdy backing - plus it would be very light weight and could more easily be suspended. What do you think?
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post #298 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

You could also apply the fabric frame approach to the ceiling. With a little creativity you could create some nice pattern or even a design or something.

Thanks I would love to do that but it has two major challenges I don't know how to overcome. 1) I could not wrap the fabric under the frame so the edges would not be tucked in nicely and have a nice finish, and 2) I don't know how to attach the fabric to the frame without seeing staples. I guess I could use finishing nails but this would be tougher to put up and far less forgiving.
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post #299 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 05:57 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd View Post

Thanks I would love to do that but it has two major challenges I don't know how to overcome. 1) I could not wrap the fabric under the frame so the edges would not be tucked in nicely and have a nice finish, and 2) I don't know how to attach the fabric to the frame without seeing staples. I guess I could use finishing nails but this would be tougher to put up and far less forgiving.

I fail to understand why you could not wrap the frames with fabric. Even if you had to staple the fabric along the side edge you would not see the staples as the frames butt up to each other. If you did have an exposed edge you can always fabricate a trim pice along the exposed edge.
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post #300 of 945 Old 12-04-2006, 06:07 PM
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I would not use cardboard - don't see how that is going to be rigid enough. I'm also like GPowers unsure why using frames will not work. Wraping fabric around square frames is pretty simple and by wraping the fabric and stapling on the rear will hid them. Also you couild bevel the edges to a great look.

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