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Old 05-01-2015, 10:48 AM
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I am guessing this has been addressed, but reading through the first 10 pages, I didn't see it - or really much related discussion, so, I am just going to ask.

Can you explain a bit about the actual process to wrap the frames in Fabric?

I tried my first one last night, and between trying to cut the fabric straight, knowing how many staples to use (I now see almost constant), if it was better to start one side vs another - long side vs short side, and definitely the rear corners (I did see the pictures in one of the early pages, which are helpful), it was just a bit more challenging than I hoped.

Do you remember what your process was to do this?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-01-2015, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmhvball View Post
I am guessing this has been addressed, but reading through the first 10 pages, I didn't see it - or really much related discussion, so, I am just going to ask.

Can you explain a bit about the actual process to wrap the frames in Fabric?

I tried my first one last night, and between trying to cut the fabric straight, knowing how many staples to use (I now see almost constant), if it was better to start one side vs another - long side vs short side, and definitely the rear corners (I did see the pictures in one of the early pages, which are helpful), it was just a bit more challenging than I hoped.

Do you remember what your process was to do this?

Thanks in advance.
You are over thinking the process. The hardest part is pulling the fabric just the right amount not to get waves in the fabric.

Mine were easy to cut as the fabric was cut in half. The other cut can be made with a straight edge.

Start on one side and staple the fabric on. Then with downward pressure on the frame pull the loose side and push the frame toward the stapled side to get the correct tension on the fabric. Hold the fabric in place, with downward pressure and staple off the opposite end.

Then repeat on the remaining two sides.

Good luck

Greg
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Last edited by GPowers; 05-01-2015 at 10:12 PM.
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Old 05-01-2015, 01:27 PM
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What kind of fabric are you cutting? If it's GOM with the rough weave, I have tip I can share for cutting it straight.

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Old 05-01-2015, 04:45 PM
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What kind of fabric are you cutting? If it's GOM with the rough weave, I have tip I can share for cutting it straight.
I am doing two different Accousticmac /DMD fabrics. One from there Executive collection,one of their basic DMD fabrics.

I'll figure it out, it was 2 am so being tired probably didn't help. Also, with the guidance I am over thinking, makes me a bit more comfortable that it isn't an exact science.
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Old 07-01-2015, 04:47 AM
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This thread is in the "Show Me Your...." section, but I don't see many people posting their Fabric Frame theaters here... I figured I would anyway, hope that is okay!

I built fabric fames, and had Fabric movie posters made (DIY Custom-Printed Movie Poster Acoustic Panels - cheap!) for a few of the fabric frames.






The majority of my frames were built using 3/4" Plywood, joined together with Kreg Jig/Pocket Screws, and then I added 3/4" Quarter Round trim to the outside to give it the rounded look.
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Old 07-07-2015, 03:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmhvball View Post
This thread is in the "Show Me Your...." section, but I don't see many people posting their Fabric Frame theaters here... I figured I would anyway, hope that is okay!

I built fabric fames, and had Fabric movie posters made (DIY Custom-Printed Movie Poster Acoustic Panels - cheap!) for a few of the fabric frames.






The majority of my frames were built using 3/4" Plywood, joined together with Kreg Jig/Pocket Screws, and then I added 3/4" Quarter Round trim to the outside to give it the rounded look.
Very nice work! I did something similar and will post a pic once I complete a finishing touch - I decided to use an adhesive black velvet (same product I used on my theater screen frame) and wrap it around the edges of my poster to give it a black-framed look. Right now my fabric just wraps around the frame which looks good on yours, but not so much on mine because I couldn't extend the poster image around the frame like you did.
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Old 08-03-2015, 09:03 AM
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Anyone have recommendations on fabric that can be used, preferably from local chain stores ?
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Old 08-03-2015, 09:42 AM
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Speaker grill fabric can look very nice for panels.
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Old 08-03-2015, 11:32 AM
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the local chain stores I visit rarely stock enough fabric to do a whole room. You want a polyester fabric that you can see and blow through.

Order free samples of the GOM fabrics from Guilford of Maine and get a sample pack of alternative fabrics from Acousticmac.com Order GOM from fabricmate.com
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Old 08-03-2015, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helmsman View Post
Very nice work! I did something similar and will post a pic once I complete a finishing touch - I decided to use an adhesive black velvet (same product I used on my theater screen frame) and wrap it around the edges of my poster to give it a black-framed look. Right now my fabric just wraps around the frame which looks good on yours, but not so much on mine because I couldn't extend the poster image around the frame like you did.

How wide are you/everyone cutting the 3/4 plywood strips for the panels ?
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Old 08-22-2015, 04:48 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by triplejs15 View Post
How wide are you/everyone cutting the 3/4 plywood strips for the panels ?
I used 1/2 plywood and the strips were 2" wide. BUT I would NOT do it that way today. look at post 929 of this thread.

I use 3/4" Popular on edge and used the router to make the profile. This was faster and allowed me to get the exact depth I wanted. I made these version 2 Fabric Frames when I add the rear speaker channels during my Atmos upgrade.

They worked great. BUT I did add the corner braces to add more strength and glue-to-wall surface area.
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Old 11-07-2015, 02:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmhvball View Post
This thread is in the "Show Me Your...." section, but I don't see many people posting their Fabric Frame theaters here... I figured I would anyway, hope that is okay!

I built fabric fames, and had Fabric movie posters made (DIY Custom-Printed Movie Poster Acoustic Panels - cheap!) for a few of the fabric frames.






The majority of my frames were built using 3/4" Plywood, joined together with Kreg Jig/Pocket Screws, and then I added 3/4" Quarter Round trim to the outside to give it the rounded look.
This is inspiring. Your theater looks great.
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Old 11-07-2015, 04:07 PM
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Amazing sub'ed for future reference

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Old 12-17-2015, 11:52 AM
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Great job. I'm considering something similar, but have question about acoustic treatments (just researching treatments now).

From what I've read so far, it seems you need about 2" of material with an air gap behind it for decent absorption (e.g. first reflection point), so how effective is 1' thickness and I presume it's touching the wall?

Regards

Mark

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Old 12-17-2015, 03:44 PM
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I've been in plenty of great sounding theaters that used only 1 or 2 inches of acoustical treatments, they must defy the science followed by those that want more for the sake of doing it better with more. As for having better absorption at the first reflection points, Professional theater designers will disagree with that strategy opting for a mix of diffusion and absorption. There are other places in the room where you can effectively absorb the lower frequencies.
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Old 12-17-2015, 03:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post
I've been in plenty of great sounding theaters that used only 1 or 2 inches of acoustical treatments, they must defy the science followed by those that want more for the sake of doing it better with more. As for having better absorption at the first reflection points, Professional theater designers will disagree with that strategy opting for a mix of diffusion and absorption. There are other places in the room where you can effectively absorb the lower frequencies.
Thanks Jeff

Good to know.

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Old 12-17-2015, 11:14 PM
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I copied the frames too
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Old 12-18-2015, 11:30 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalevolentHamster View Post
From what I've read so far, it seems you need about 2" of material with an air gap behind it for decent absorption (e.g. first reflection point), so how effective is 1' thickness and I presume it's touching the wall?

Regards

Mark
You do the best you can with the resources you have. I did not have the money to pay for a pro designed theater. I could pay for the Pro design and not build the theater or use the money to build a theater based on the information and research in this forum and others. My guess was that I could get 80% of what a pro design would give me. So 80% is better then nothing. And we have enjoyed the theater with family and friends for years.

So if you have the resources and space to do 2 or 3 inches of acoustic treatment go for it. In my case I'am very happy with the 80% I have.
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Old 12-18-2015, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by GPowers View Post
You do the best you can with the resources you have. I did not have the money to pay for a pro designed theater. I could pay for the Pro design and not build the theater or use the money to build a theater based on the information and research in this forum and others. My guess was that I could get 80% of what a pro design would give me. So 80% is better then nothing. And we have enjoyed the theater with family and friends for years.

So if you have the resources and space to do 2 or 3 inches of acoustic treatment go for it. In my case I'am very happy with the 80% I have.
Thanks GP. Did you use 1" and what material was it?

What percent of the wall space contained acoustic foam and what did you put inside the other panels (if anything)?

I read your thread on your panels last week. If you were to do it again today, what would you do different

Regards

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Old 12-18-2015, 12:48 PM
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Keep in mind the coefficient numbers we look at to compare thickness are measured head on... much like the front 3 speakers bouncing off the rear wall. The side walls the angle of incidence is factored in.. the more angle the more absorption material the wave is traveling though and the lower the frequency absorbed. Therefore the sidewalls could actually be thinner that the rear wall panels and absorb just as low. Same with carpet and padding.. the more angle the better it will absorb. It's very feasible that say 1.5" will absorb just as well on the side walls as 2" on the back wall.

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Old 12-18-2015, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Are the walls acoustically treated ?

The walls are finished with Guilford of Maine fabric. The fabric is
acoustically transparent. The bottom half of the wall is treated with
one inch linacoustic from John Manville Insulation. The top half is
backed with poly batten. The material are one inch thick.
Hi GP

I'm just reading up on acoustic treatments, and think I have a handle on first reflections, bass trapping and diffusion.

I've seen a lot of people putting linacoustic on the bottom half of the wall. What purpose does that server?

Thanks

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Old 12-18-2015, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DodgeViper View Post
Quote:Originally Posted by swithey

I follow you. Well, now I have some things to think about. I'm contemplating just glueing the front and side wall panels directly to the wall (with brad support like Gary did) and hanging the rear ones with the method you described above (I need access to the rear wall because it is a false wall). Glueing would save a lot of time. The only issue would be if I ever needed to remove the panels from some reason. I cannot think of one right now except to change the fabric. Hopefully by that time I'll be selling the house

GARY --> You said you had to pull down a few the other day to remake them because of some rattling. Where they difficult to pull off, did it tear up the drywall pretty badly and how well did they stick back on the wall


In this drawing you can see how the cleats would be hidden on the ends. Routering the entire outside edge is not a problem.

Hi dodge viper. I know it's a very old thread, but all your pix are missing. Do you have them anywhere else?

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Old 12-18-2015, 03:15 PM
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Hi GP


I've seen a lot of people putting linacoustic on the bottom half of the wall. What purpose does that server?

That's absorption blanket (it absorbs acoustic energy), it's flexible duct liner HVAC shops sell. Basically the same as OC703.. compressed fiberglass. Ductboard from an HVAC shop is the same think only rigid.
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Old 12-19-2015, 10:13 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalevolentHamster View Post
Thanks GP. Did you use 1" and what material was it?

What percent of the wall space contained acoustic foam and what did you put inside the other panels (if anything)?

I read your thread on your panels last week. If you were to do it again today, what would you do different

Regards

mark
I used 1" compressed fiberglass. The product is Linacoustic from john Mansfield's. The compressed fiber glass is on the bottom half of the wall on the side walls and back wall. On the scree wall it is floor to ceiling. The top half of the wall has poly batten the stuff quilters use in making quilts. It is also 1" thick.

hope this helps.

Greg
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Old 12-20-2015, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by GPowers View Post
I used 1" compressed fiberglass. The product is Linacoustic from john Mansfield's. The compressed fiber glass is on the bottom half of the wall on the side walls and back wall. On the scree wall it is floor to ceiling. The top half of the wall has poly batten the stuff quilters use in making quilts. It is also 1" thick.

hope this helps.

Greg
Thanks Greg

Can't wait to get started on mine now

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Old 12-20-2015, 07:24 AM
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Thanks for the comments. I'll start my own thread when I get new pics.

The door is more complex than it looks... while being simple at the same time. It's a standard, steel door so it has full weatherstripping with a threshold.

But the inside face of the door sat back about 2-1/2" from the other frames in the room. Because of that setback, if I just mounted frames to the door I would have had to leave a 3" gap on the right side (hinge side) so that the frames would clear the door frame.

What I decided I wanted to do was to have the frames the full width of the door but have them slide out away from the hinge as the door is opened and then move back into position as the door was closed.

How I did it was to mount 2, 24" wide ball bearing chassis slides to the inside face of the door. Then I mounted a piece of 1/2" MDF to the mating pieces of the chassis slides and then mounted the frames to the MDF with french cleats and velcro. So the mdf (with the frames attached) was now able to move left and right. I rigged up a pivot hinge and piece of steel angle and mounted that angle to the door and the pivot hinge to the door frame. You can see it on the right side of the door.

So, when I open the door the mdf panel slowly moves the about 1.5" or so automatically to the left which is just enough for the frames to clear the hinge side of door frame when the door is open 90 degrees.

I had to buy 2 sets of door knobs and weld them together to get a shaft that would span the entire 4" or so of door thickness.

It's pretty cool and a subtle detail that I am proud of. Thanks again.
Sounds ingenious, but can;t picture how it works. Racked my brains over this for quite some time and it seems a wide throw or parliament hinge would be a simple solution:



This is the direction I will go

Hope this helps someone

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Old 12-20-2015, 09:24 AM
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A wide or parliament hinge would not have worked for my situation because of the thickness of my door and the door frame. The farther you move the pivot point of the hinge away from the face of the door, the farther the door will have to move in the opposite direction at the start of it's movement. I have a thick door and a door jamb that's really deep and fabric frames hanging on the wall around the door jamb which further increases the depth or thickness. A wide hinge may work if you don't have a similar situation.

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